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Persuasion

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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agitate
21 uses
Every moment rather brought fresh agitation.
agitation = emotional unrest

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
DefinitionGenerally agitate means:
to stir up or shake — emotionally (as when people are angered or upset) or physically (as when a washing machine cleans clothes)
Word Statistics
Book21 uses
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
apprehend
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
apprehend misfortune
In every other respect, in looking around her, or penetrating forward, she saw more to distrust and to apprehend.†
apprehend = fear

(editor's note:  This is commonly seen in the forms apprehensive or apprehension, but it is also seen in this form in classic literature.)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of apprehend means:
fear, or anticipate with worry
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 16
Web Links
benevolent
2 uses
She was a benevolent, charitable, good woman, and...
benevolent = kind or generous
DefinitionGenerally benevolent means:
kind, generous, or charitable
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
candid
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
your candid opinion
He was steady, observant, moderate, candid;
candid = honest and direct
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 16
Web Links
capricious
1 use
They have no difficulties to contend with at home, no opposition, no caprice, no delays.
caprice = unpredictability
DefinitionGenerally capricious means:
impulsive or unpredictable or tending to make sudden changes — especially impulsive behavior
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 20
Web Links
comprehend
15 uses
In her own room, she tried to comprehend it.
comprehend = understand or understand completely
DefinitionGenerally comprehend means:
to understand something — especially to understand it completely
Word Statistics
Book15 uses
Library20 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
defer
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
deferred the decision
...to defer her explanatory visit in Rivers Street.
defer = postpone (put off until a later time)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of defer means:
delay or postpone (hold off until a later time)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 23
Web Links
digress
1 use
...and then it was, just before they parted, that the two young aunts were able so far to digress from their nephew's state, as to give the information of Captain Wentworth's visit;
digress = change the subject of conversation
DefinitionGenerally digress means:
wander from a direct or straight course — typically verbally
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
dissent
1 use
Mrs Musgrove had not a word to say in dissent;
dissent = disagreement
DefinitionGenerally dissent means:
to disagree; or disagreement or conflict — typically between people who cooperate, and often with official or majority beliefs
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
duplicity
1 use
The manoeuvres of selfishness and duplicity must ever be revolting, but I have heard nothing which really surprises me.
duplicity = deception
DefinitionGenerally duplicity means:
deception (lying to or misleading others) — usually over an extended period
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 21
Web Links
expedient
2 uses
and had finally proposed these two branches of economy, to cut off some unnecessary charities, and to refrain from new furnishing the drawing-room; to which expedients she afterwards added the happy thought of their taking no present down to Anne, as had been the usual yearly custom.
expedients = practical actions
DefinitionGenerally expedient means:
a practical action — especially one that accepts negative tradeoffs due to circumstances

or:

convenient, speedy, or practical
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
fastidious
3 uses
the fastidiousness of her taste, in the small limits of the society around them.
fastidiousness = highly concerned with matters of taste

(Editor's note:  The suffix "-ness" converts an adjective to a noun that means the quality of. This is the same pattern you see in words like darkness, kindness, and coolness.)
DefinitionGenerally fastidious means:
giving careful attention to detail

or:

excessively concerned with cleanliness or matters of taste
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
forbearance
3 uses
give them all hints of the forbearance necessary between such near neighbours
forbearance = patience, tolerance, or self-control
DefinitionGenerally forbearance means:
refraining (holding back) from acting

or:

patience, tolerance, or self-control
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
however
74 uses
1  —74 uses as in:
However, complications may...
To those, however, he was very well disposed to attach himself.†
however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
DefinitionGenerally this sense of however means:
though (or another expression that connects contrasting ideas)

(Based on idea 1 we might not expect idea 2, but this is a way of saying that even though idea 1 exists, we still have idea 2.  Synonyms include in spite of that, , nevertheless, nonetheless, on the other hand, in contrastand but.)
Word Statistics
Book74 uses
Library61 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
ostentatious
1 use
Anne could not draw upon Charles's brain for ... an explanation of some smiling hints of particular business, which had been ostentatiously dropped by Mary,
ostentatiously = in a manner intended to attract notice and impress others
DefinitionGenerally ostentatious means:
intended to attract notice and impress others — especially with wealth in a vulgar way
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22
Web Links
recant
1 use
This was very wonderful if it were true; and Lady Russell was in a state of very agreeable curiosity and perplexity about Mr Elliot, already recanting the sentiment she had so lately expressed to Mary, of his being "a man whom she had no wish to see."
recanting = taking back
DefinitionGenerally recant means:
for one to say they no longer believe a previously made statement or belief — often while under pressure
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 14
Web Links
refute
2 uses
He was astonished, indeed, but his character and general conduct must refute it.
refute = show that it is not so
DefinitionGenerally refute means:
to disprove or argue against
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 21
Web Links
reprehensible
1 use
I saw nothing reprehensible in what Mr Elliot was doing.
reprehensible = bad or unacceptable
DefinitionGenerally reprehensible means:
bad — deserving severe criticism
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 21
Web Links
scrupulous
4 uses
He is so very strict and scrupulous in his notions;
scrupulous = careful to behave ethically and/or diligently
DefinitionGenerally scrupulous means:
careful to behave ethically and/or diligently (with great care and attention to detail)
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
zeal
6 uses
As it was, he did nothing with much zeal, but sport; and his time was otherwise trifled away, without benefit from books or anything else.
zeal = active interest and enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9
Web Links
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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