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Nicholas Nickleby

Extra Credit Words with Typical Sample Sentences

instructions
acrimony
2 uses
The meeting ended in acrimony.
acrimony = anger
DefinitionGenerally acrimony means:
anger—often accompanied by bitterness
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 39
Web Links
approach
5 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
approached her with the proposal
They approached her about becoming a member of the committee.
approached = began communication with
DefinitionGenerally this sense of approach means:
to begin communication with someone about something — often a proposal or a delicate topic
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePref.
Web Links
unquizzed meaning  —3 uses
capricious
3 uses
Nothing seems more capricious than a tornado.
capricious = unpredictable
DefinitionGenerally capricious means:
impulsive or unpredictable or tending to make sudden changes — especially impulsive behavior
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 28
Web Links
complacent
17 uses
She had become complacent after years of success.
complacent = unworried and satisfied
DefinitionGenerally complacent means:
contented (unworried and satisfied) — often to a fault
Word Statistics
Book17 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
defer
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
deferred the decision
The weather forced us to defer our departure another day.
defer = delay
DefinitionGenerally this sense of defer means:
delay or postpone (hold off until a later time)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 53
Web Links
depravity
3 uses
It is a terrible story of an innocent who trusted a man who treated her with ruthless depravity.
depravity = immorality or evilness
DefinitionGenerally depravity means:
complete immorality or evilness
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 50
Web Links
deride
4 uses
She relentlessly mocks and derides the younger students.
derides = criticizes with strong disrespect
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
to criticize with strong disrespect — often
with humor
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 45
Web Links
deter
4 uses
She was slow to decide what to do, but once she did nothing could deter her from her chosen course of action.
deter = discourage (prevent)
DefinitionGenerally deter means:
try to prevent; or prevent
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 40
Web Links
disparage
1 use
She has a reputation for disparaging the efforts of her co-workers.
disparaging = criticizing or making seem less important
DefinitionGenerally disparage means:
to criticize or make seem less important — especially in a disrespectful or contemptuous manner
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 35
Web Links
expedient
8 uses
It was a necessary expedient to get the job done.
expedient = a speedy or practical action

(The word necessary, implies that there were undesired aspects of the action.)
DefinitionGenerally expedient means:
a practical action — especially one that accepts negative tradeoffs due to circumstances

or:

convenient, speedy, or practical
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
fastidious
5 uses
She is fastidious in her work.
fastidious = careful and attentive to detail
DefinitionGenerally fastidious means:
giving careful attention to detail

or:

excessively concerned with cleanliness or matters of taste
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
guile
3 uses
Her cleverness and inventiveness was exceeded only by her guile.
guile = cunning (shrewdness and cleverness) and deceit
DefinitionGenerally guile means:
cunning (shrewdness and cleverness) and deceitful
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
obscure   (3 meanings)
3 meanings, 7 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
it obscured my view
The stars are obscured by the clouds.
obscured = hidden or made less visible
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
to block from view or make less visible or understandable
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 52
Web Links
2  —2 uses as in:
knows the famous and the obscure
The obscure battle is hardly mentioned in history books.
obscure = not known to many people
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
not known to many people; or unimportant or undistinguished
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 20
Web Links
3  —1 use as in:
was obscure, but now bright
The once shiny silver was now tarnished and obscure.
obscure = dark, dingy, or inconspicuous
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
dark or dingy; or inconspicuous (not very noticeable)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 40
Web Links
refute
2 uses
The speaker refuted his opponent's arguments.
refuted = argued against
DefinitionGenerally refute means:
to disprove or argue against
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 14
Web Links
remonstrate
28 uses
When she has a complaint with her staff, she will remonstrate quietly and in private.
remonstrate = criticize or argue
DefinitionGenerally remonstrate means:
argue, complain, or criticize
Word Statistics
Book28 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 35
Web Links
scrupulous
10 uses
You can count on her. She is scrupulous in her work.
scrupulous = careful and thorough
DefinitionGenerally scrupulous means:
careful to behave ethically and/or diligently (with great care and attention to detail)
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 21
Web Links
simile
1 use
When she said he was "as subtle as a sledgehammer," she was using ironic simile.
simile = a phrase that highlights similarity between things of different kinds
DefinitionGenerally simile means:
a phrase that highlights similarity between things of different kinds — usually formed with "like" or "as"

as in "It's like looking for a needle in a haystack," or "She is as quiet as a mouse."
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 34
Web Links
zeal
4 uses
She attacks each challenge with zeal.
zeal = active interest and enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 40
Web Links
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