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Heart of Darkness

Extra Credit Words with Typical Sample Sentences

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ascetic
1 use
The ascetic life has been more pronounced in Hinduism and Buddhism than in other major religions.
ascetic = the practice of self-denial
DefinitionGenerally ascetic means:
someone who practices self-denial (often to encourage spiritual growth); or relating to such self-denial

or:

severely plain (without decoration)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
audacious
2 uses
It was an audacious act of piracy.
audacious = bold and daring
DefinitionGenerally audacious means:
bold and daring (inclined to take risks) — especially in violating social convention in a manner that could offend others
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
bronze   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 4 uses
1  —1 use as in:
bronze won't corrode in salt water
The sculpture of a bull on Wall Street is made of bronze.
bronze = a brownish metal that is made of copper and (usually) tin
DefinitionGenerally this sense of bronze means:
a brownish-colored metal with red or yellow hues that is made of copper and (usually) tin
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
2  —3 uses as in:
a bronze tan
He was attracted by her shining bronze hair.
bronze = reddish-brown or yellowish-brown
DefinitionGenerally this sense of bronze means:
a reddish-brown or yellowish-brown color like that of one of the metals with the same name — often used to refer to a suntan or a dark glowing complexion
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
confound
9 uses
She confounded her critics.
confounded = frustrated
DefinitionGenerally confound means:
to confuse, prove wrong, frustrate, or express frustration
in various senses, including:
confuse or surprise — sometimes specifically to confuse one thing with another
  • "confounded by the puzzle" — confused or perplexed
  • "Test results confounded the experts." — surprised and confused
  • "Do not confound confidence with correctness." — mistake one thing for another
prove wrong, defeat, or frustrate
  • "The test results confounded my theory." — proved wrong
  • "Their defense confounded our offense." — defeated or frustrated
make worse
  • "She confounded the problem by painting without sanding." — made worse
  • "The task is complicated by other confounding factors." — making worse
an exclamation expressing anger or frustration
  • "Confound it! Will I ever get this thing to work?"
  • "I don't understand the confounded directions!"
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
despondent
2 uses
When her mother died, she was so despondent it was hard for her to get out of bed.
despondent = emotionally depressed
DefinitionGenerally despondent means:
emotionally depressed — especially a feeling of grief and hopelessness after a loss
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
disclaim
1 use
We disclaim any responsibility for the accident.
disclaim = deny
DefinitionGenerally disclaim means:
to deny (responsibility for, knowledge of, or ownership of)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
dubious
1 use
She was dubious, but agreed to come with us anyway.
dubious = doubtful; or suspicious; or full of uncertainty
DefinitionGenerally dubious means:
doubtful
in various senses, including:
  • doubtful that something should be relied upon — as in "The argument relies on a dubious assumption."
  • doubtful that something is morally proper — as in "The company is accused of using dubious sales practices to influence minors."
  • bad or of questionable value — as in "The state has the dubious distinction of the highest taxes."
  • doubtful or uncertain — as in "She is dubious about making the change."
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
enigma
1 use
As Churchill said about Russia, it is a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma.
enigma = something mysterious that seems unexplainable
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
guile
1 use
Her cleverness and inventiveness was exceeded only by her guile.
guile = cunning (shrewdness and cleverness) and deceit
DefinitionGenerally guile means:
cunning (shrewdness and cleverness) and deceitful
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
immutable
1 use
It is an immutable law of physics.
immutable = unchangeable
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
innate
1 use
She has an innate musical talent that cannot be taught.
innate = present at birth
DefinitionGenerally innate means:
of a quality:  present at birth; or arising from within rather than having been learned or acquired
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
insidious
1 use
The debt grew insidiously—just a little at a time and always for a good purpose.
Alan Greenspan  --  The Age of Turbulence
insidiously = in a manner not appearing dangerous, but actually very harmful over time
DefinitionGenerally insidious means:
not appearing dangerous, but actually very harmful over time

or:

treacherous  (dangerous due to trickery or from hidden or unpredictable risks)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
obscure   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
it obscured my view
The stars are obscured by the clouds.
obscured = hidden or made less visible
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
to block from view or make less visible or understandable
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
knows the famous and the obscure
The obscure battle is hardly mentioned in history books.
obscure = not known to many people
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
not known to many people; or unimportant or undistinguished
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
ostentatious
2 uses
Although wealthy, the family is not ostentatious.
ostentatious = showy (trying to attract notice and impress others in a manner seen as in bad taste)
DefinitionGenerally ostentatious means:
intended to attract notice and impress others — especially with wealth in a vulgar way
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
precipitate
1 use
1  —1 use
(adj) as in: a precipitate decision
Think about this. Don't make a precipitate decision.
precipitate = sudden (without adequate thought)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of precipitate means:
acting with great haste — often without adequate thought
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
pretense
4 uses
The country maintains a pretense of a free press.
pretense = false appearance
DefinitionGenerally pretense means:
a false appearance or action to help one pretend
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
prudent
2 uses
She was promoted to manager because she is so prudent.
prudent = sensible and careful
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
sagacious
1 use
She is a smart and sagacious statesman.
sagacious = wise
DefinitionGenerally sagacious means:
wise — especially through long experience and thoughtfulness
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
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