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Hard Times

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
acquit
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
she was acquitted
Acquit me of impertinent curiosity, my dear Mrs. Bounderby.†
acquit = find innocent
DefinitionGenerally this sense of acquit means:
to officially find "not guilty" of criminal charges; or (informally) to find someone innocent of a charge of having done wrong
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.7
Web Links
acrimony
1 use
During the whole term of this recess from the guardianship of the Bank, Mrs. Sparsit was a pattern of consistency; continuing to take such pity on Mr. Bounderby to his face, as is rarely taken on man, and to call his portrait a Noodle to its face, with the greatest acrimony and contempt.
acrimony = anger
DefinitionGenerally acrimony means:
anger—often accompanied by bitterness
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.10
Web Links
benevolent
1 use
The only difference between us and the professors of virtue or benevolence, or philanthropy - never mind the name - is, that we know it is all meaningless, and say so; while they know it equally and will never say so.
benevolence = kindness or generosity
DefinitionGenerally benevolent means:
kind, generous, or charitable
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2.7
Web Links
candid
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
your candid opinion
Candidly to confess everything that has occurred to me ... I will confide to you my doubt whether he has had many advantages.
candidly = with honesty and directness
DefinitionGenerally this sense of candid means:
honest and direct
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 2.7
Web Links
conciliatory
2 uses
From the first he had sought to conciliate that gentleman,
conciliate = attempt to end bad feelings or build trust
DefinitionGenerally conciliatory means:
intended to end bad feelings or build trust
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.7
Web Links
contrite
3 uses
"And I said, Miss;" here Sissy fairly sobbed as confessing with extreme contrition to her greatest error; "I said it was nothing."
contrition = sorrow or regret for a fault or offense

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
DefinitionGenerally contrite means:
feeling sorrow or regret for a fault or offense
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.9
Web Links
credulous
3 uses
Master Kidderminster, grown too maturely turfy to be received by the wildest credulity as Cupid any more, had yielded to the invincible force of circumstances (and his beard), and...
credulity = gullibility (being too willing to believe)
DefinitionGenerally credulous means:
gullible (being too willing to believe)
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.7
Web Links
disparage
2 uses
don't disparage your judgment.
disparage = criticize or make seem less good
DefinitionGenerally disparage means:
to criticize or make seem less important — especially in a disrespectful or contemptuous manner
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 3.9
Web Links
dispose
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
disposed the troops along...
Not much of that, Mr. Harthouse, unless some fair creature with a slashing fortune at her own disposal would take a fancy to me.†
disposal = command

(editor's note:  When something is "at someone's disposal" it is "at their command," or "available for their use." They can use it as they please.)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of dispose means:
the arrangement, positioning, or use of things
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2.7
Web Links
entreat
12 uses
Let me entreat you, for your own sake and for hers, to be more quiet.
entreat = ask
DefinitionGenerally entreat means:
to ask — especially while trying hard to overcome resistance
Word Statistics
Book12 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.6
Web Links
exonerate
1 use
Broadsides in the streets, signed with her father's name, exonerating the late Stephen Blackpool, weaver, from misplaced suspicion, and publishing the guilt of his own son, with such extenuation as his years and temptation (he could not bring himself to add, his education) might beseech; were of the Present.
exonerating = freed (from blame)
DefinitionGenerally exonerate means:
to free someone from blame

or more rarely:

to free someone from an obligation
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.9
Web Links
furtive
1 use
...having her reasons for hovering in a furtive way about the station by which a passenger would arrive from Yorkshire, and for preferring to peep into it round pillars and corners, and out of ladies' waiting-room windows, to appearing in its precincts openly.
furtive = taking pains to avoid being observed
DefinitionGenerally furtive means:
taking pains to avoid being observed

or:

in a manner indicating nervousness (being cautious or appearing suspicious)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.11
Web Links
languid
9 uses
Louisa awoke from a torpor, and her eyes languidly opened on her old bed at home, and her old room.
languidly = slowly and in a relaxing, non-energetic manner
DefinitionGenerally languid means:
lacking energy or relaxed or moving slowly
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.4
Web Links
novel
1 use
Lastly, he was to wind them up by appearing in his favourite character of Mr. William Button, of Tooley Street, in 'the highly novel and laughable hippocomedietta of The Tailor's Journey to Brentford.'
novel = new and original
DefinitionGenerally this sense of novel means:
new and original — typically something considered good
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 1.3
Web Links
obstinate
8 uses
refuses for some obstinate reason or other to say anything at all about those statements
obstinate = stubbornly unyielding to other's wishes
DefinitionGenerally obstinate means:
stubbornly not doing what others want
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.2
Web Links
patron
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a patron of the arts
Therefore, to my patron I will be scrupulously true.
patron = financial supporter
DefinitionGenerally this sense of patron means:
someone who contributes money to an organization

or:

a supporter of an organization or person
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.1
Web Links
quibble
1 use
Had he any prescience of the day, five years to come, when Josiah Bounderby of Coketown was to die of a fit in the Coketown street, and this same precious will was to begin its long career of quibble, plunder, false pretences, vile example, little service and much law?
quibble = argument about unimportant things
DefinitionGenerally quibble means:
to argue about unimportant things; or an argument or complaint about something unimportant
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.9
Web Links
recumbent
1 use
Accordingly, they went down to the drawing-room, where the esteemed lady with no nonsense about her, was recumbent as usual, while Sissy worked beside her.
recumbent = lying down
DefinitionGenerally recumbent means:
lying down; or horizontal
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.15
Web Links
sagacious
3 uses
"Very sagacious indeed, sir," said Mrs. Sparsit.
sagacious = wise
DefinitionGenerally sagacious means:
wise — especially through long experience and thoughtfulness
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.3
Web Links
venerate
1 use
She fell upon her knees, and clinging to this stroller's child looked up at her almost with veneration.
veneration = feelings of deep respect and reverence

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
DefinitionGenerally venerate means:
regard with feelings of respect and reverence
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.1
Web Links
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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