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Far from the Madding Crowd

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
aesthetic
1 use
in this attribute moral or aesthetic poverty contrasts plausibly with material, since those who suffer do not mind it, whilst those who mind it soon cease to suffer.
aesthetic = appreciation of beauty

(editor's note:  Hardy is contrasting poverty with bad morals or bad taste. He says people who are poor are unhappy and cannot change their situation. But people with bad morals or bad taste either don't mind their situation, or change themselves.)
DefinitionGenerally aesthetic means:
related to beauty or good taste — often referring to one's appreciation of beauty or one's sense of what is beautiful

or:

beautiful or tasteful
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 25-27
Web Links
amble
2 uses
The tall lank pony seemed used to such doings, and ambled along unconcerned.
ambled = walked leisurely
DefinitionGenerally amble means:
to walk leisurely or slowly
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1-3
Web Links
apathy
1 use
However, one excellent result of her general apathy was the long-delayed installation of Oak as bailiff;
apathy = lack of interest and enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 49-51
Web Links
bronze
3 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
a bronze tan
He was a gentlemanly man, with full and distinctly outlined Roman features, the prominences of which glowed in the sun with a bronze-like richness of tone.
bronze = reddish-brown or yellowish-brown
DefinitionGenerally this sense of bronze means:
a reddish-brown or yellowish-brown color like that of one of the metals with the same name — often used to refer to a suntan or a dark glowing complexion
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10-12
Web Links
capricious
1 use
said Bathsheba, dropping from haughtiness to entreaty with capricious inconsequence.
capricious = impulsive
DefinitionGenerally capricious means:
impulsive or unpredictable or tending to make sudden changes — especially impulsive behavior
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 28-30
Web Links
credulous
3 uses
A man is never more credulous than in receiving favourable opinions on the beauty of a woman he is half, or quite, in love with;
credulous = willing to believe
DefinitionGenerally credulous means:
gullible (being too willing to believe)
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 16-18
Web Links
deride
3 uses
A low gurgle of derisive laughter followed the words.
derisive = treating as inferior and unworthy of respect

(editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
to criticize with strong disrespect — often
with humor
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 31-33
Web Links
digress
1 use
That remark is a sort of digression.
digression = getting off topic

(editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
DefinitionGenerally digress means:
wander from a direct or straight course — typically verbally
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 25-27
Web Links
disparage
1 use
The maltster, being now pacified, was even generous enough to voluntarily disparage in a slight degree the virtue of having lived a great many years,
disparage = make seem less important
DefinitionGenerally disparage means:
to criticize or make seem less important — especially in a disrespectful or contemptuous manner
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 7-9
Web Links
exemplar
1 use
after having been pointed out for so many years as the perfect exemplar of thriving bachelorship
exemplar = ideal example
DefinitionGenerally exemplar means:
an example — especially one that represents the ideal
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22-24
Web Links
guile
2 uses
Bathsheba was not conscious of guile in this matter.
guile = cunning (shrewd, clever) and deceit
DefinitionGenerally guile means:
cunning (shrewdness and cleverness) and deceitful
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 31-33
Web Links
however   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 60 uses
1  —56 uses as in:
However, complications may...
However, we couldn't think of letting the day pass without a note of admiration of some sort.†
however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
DefinitionGenerally this sense of however means:
though (or another expression that connects contrasting ideas)

(Based on idea 1 we might not expect idea 2, but this is a way of saying that even though idea 1 exists, we still have idea 2.  Synonyms include in spite of that, , nevertheless, nonetheless, on the other hand, in contrastand but.)
Word Statistics
Book56 uses
Library61 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 1-3
Web Links
2  —2 uses as in:
However much she tried...
She's hot and hasty, but she's a brave girl who'll never tell a lie however much the truth may harm her, and I've no cause to wish her evil.†
however = regardless of how
DefinitionGenerally this sense of however means:
to whatever degree (regardless of how much; or whatever unspecified amount)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4-6
Web Links
unquizzed meaning  —2 uses
immutable
1 use
In comparison with cities, Weatherbury was immutable.
immutable = unchanging
DefinitionGenerally immutable means:
unchangeable
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22-24
Web Links
minute
4 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
minute size
In feeling for each other's palm in the gloom before the money could be passed, a minute incident occurred which told much.†
minute = small
DefinitionGenerally this sense of minute means:
small, exceptionally small, or insignificant
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1-3
Web Links
recumbent
3 uses
Oak went to the recumbent form of Matthew Moon, who usually undertook the rough thatching of the home-stead, and shook him.
recumbent = lying down
DefinitionGenerally recumbent means:
lying down; or horizontal
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 34-36
Web Links
reticent
2 uses
the reticence of her tongue only made the loquacity of her face the more noticeable.
reticence = reluctance

(editor's note: loquacity is to be talkative)
DefinitionGenerally reticent means:
reluctant — especially to speak freely
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 19-21
Web Links
speculative
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a speculative venture
Probably, as with persons playing whist for love, the consciousness of a certain immunity under any circumstances from that worst possible ultimate, the having to pay, makes them unduly speculative.
speculative = risk-taking
DefinitionGenerally this sense of speculative means:
done with uncertainty—often a risky investment for profit
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10-12
Web Links
strata
2 uses
The vast arch of cloud above was strangely low, and formed as it were the roof of a large dark cavern, gradually sinking in upon its floor; for the instinctive thought was that the snow lining the heavens and that encrusting the earth would soon unite into one mass without any intervening stratum of air at all.
stratum = layer

(editor's note:  Strata, the plural form of this word is used much more commonly than the singular form. Many Latin words that end in "um" are made plural by changing the "um" to "a"—such as stratum to strata, bacterium to bacteria, and millennium to millennia. In modern writing, changing the "um" to "ums" is also accepted for many Latin words ending in um, but not for any of those listed above.)
DefinitionGenerally strata means:
layers

or:

levels, classes, or groups into which people or other things are divided
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10-12
Web Links
succession
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
a succession of events
Soon soft spirts alternating with loud spirts came in regular succession from within the shed, the obvious sounds of a person milking a cow.
succession = sequence (one after another)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of succession means:
series or sequence (one after another)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1-3
Web Links
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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