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Emma
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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acquiesce
6 uses
Mr. Woodhouse was to be talked into an acquiescence of his daughter's going out to dinner on a day now near at hand, and spending the whole evening away from him.
acquiescence = reluctant consent (agreeing to)
DefinitionGenerally acquiesce means:
reluctant or unenthusiastic compliance, consent, or agreement
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.5-6
Web Links
benevolent
6 uses
I know no man more likely than Mr. Knightley to do the sort of thing—to do any thing really good-natured, useful, considerate, or benevolent.
benevolent = kind or generous
DefinitionGenerally benevolent means:
kind, generous, or charitable
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.11-12
Web Links
capricious
5 uses
The aunt was a capricious woman,
capricious = impulsive and unpredictable
DefinitionGenerally capricious means:
impulsive or unpredictable or tending to make sudden changes — especially impulsive behavior
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.1-2
Web Links
censure
6 uses
"I do not think he is conceited either, in general," said Harriet, her conscience opposing such censure;
censure = criticism
DefinitionGenerally censure means:
harsh criticism; or formal criticism from an organization — such as the U.S. Senate
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.7-8
Web Links
complacent
4 uses
She felt all the honest pride and complacency which her alliance with the present and future proprietor could fairly warrant,
complacency = satisfaction and contentment
DefinitionGenerally complacent means:
contented (unworried and satisfied) — often to a fault
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 3.1-2
Web Links
conciliatory
1 use
I am sure ... her fears will completely wear off, for there really is nothing in the manners of either but what is highly conciliating.
conciliating = tending to build trust
DefinitionGenerally conciliatory means:
intended to end bad feelings or build trust
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.15-16
Web Links
contrite
2 uses
In the warmth of true contrition, she would call upon her the very next morning, and it should be the beginning, on her side, of a regular, equal, kindly intercourse.
contrition = sorrow or regret for a fault or offense
DefinitionGenerally contrite means:
feeling sorrow or regret for a fault or offense
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.7-8
Web Links
dissent
1 use
There was not a dissentient voice on the subject,
dissentient = disagreeing
DefinitionGenerally dissent means:
to disagree; or disagreement or conflict — typically between people who cooperate, and often with official or majority beliefs
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.1-2
Web Links
expedient
5 uses
The longer she considered it, the greater was her sense of its expediency.
expediency = practicality or speediness
DefinitionGenerally expedient means:
a practical action — especially one that accepts negative tradeoffs due to circumstances

or:

convenient, speedy, or practical
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.3-4
Web Links
fastidious
1 use
And he was really a very pleasing young man, a young man whom any woman not fastidious might like.
fastidious = giving careful attention to small details
DefinitionGenerally fastidious means:
giving careful attention to detail

or:

excessively concerned with cleanliness or matters of taste
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.3-4
Web Links
incessant
5 uses
engaging the housekeeper in incessant conversation
incessant = continuous
DefinitionGenerally incessant means:
continuous — often in an annoying way
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.9-10
Web Links
insipid
1 use
This sensation of listlessness, weariness, stupidity, this disinclination to sit down and employ myself, this feeling of every thing's being dull and insipid about the house!
insipid = uninteresting and without impact
DefinitionGenerally insipid means:
dull (uninteresting and unimpactful)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.11-12
Web Links
obscure
3 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
the view or directions are obscure
Oh! but dear Miss Woodhouse, she is now in such retirement, such obscurity, so thrown away.
obscurity = difficulty in understanding
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
not clearly seen, understood, or expressed
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1.7-8
Web Links
penury
1 use
And now to chuse the mortification of Mrs. Elton's notice and the penury of her conversation, rather than return to the superior companions who have always loved her with such real, generous affection.
penury = poverty (in this case, used figuratively)
DefinitionGenerally penury means:
a state of extreme poverty or destitution
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.15-16
Web Links
refute
1 use
though the accusation had been eagerly refuted at the time, there were moments of self-examination in which her conscience could not quite acquit her.
refuted = argued against
DefinitionGenerally refute means:
to prove or argue that something is false
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 2.1-2
Web Links
remonstrate
4 uses
I cannot see you acting wrong, without a remonstrance.
remonstrance = argument in protest or opposition
DefinitionGenerally remonstrate means:
argue in protest or opposition
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.15-16
Web Links
reprehensible
1 use
This amiable, upright, perfect Jane Fairfax was apparently cherishing very reprehensible feelings.
reprehensible = bad (worthy of criticism)
DefinitionGenerally reprehensible means:
bad and unacceptable — deserving severe criticism
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.9-10
Web Links
sanguine
8 uses
but a sanguine temper, though for ever expecting more good than occurs, does not always pay for its hopes by any proportionate depression.
sanguine = confidently optimistic and cheerful
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.1-2
Web Links
scrupulous
4 uses
I thought her, on a thousand occasions, unnecessarily scrupulous and cautious:
scrupulous = extremely careful to do everything properly
DefinitionGenerally scrupulous means:
careful to behave ethically and/or diligently (with great care and attention to detail)
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.15-16
Web Links
zeal
4 uses
admiring her drawings with so much zeal and so little knowledge
zeal = active interest and enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.13-14
Web Links
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