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Emma

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
acquiesce
6 uses
Mr. Woodhouse was to be talked into an acquiescence of his daughter's going out to dinner on a day now near at hand, and spending the whole evening away from him.
acquiescence = reluctant consent (agreeing to)
DefinitionGenerally acquiesce means:
reluctant or unenthusiastic compliance, consent, or agreement
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.5-6
Web Links
benevolent
6 uses
I know no man more likely than Mr. Knightley to do the sort of thing—to do any thing really good-natured, useful, considerate, or benevolent.
benevolent = kind or generous
DefinitionGenerally benevolent means:
kind, generous, or charitable
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1.11-12
Web Links
capricious
5 uses
The aunt was a capricious woman,
capricious = impulsive and unpredictable
DefinitionGenerally capricious means:
impulsive or unpredictable or tending to make sudden changes — especially impulsive behavior
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.1-2
Web Links
complacent
4 uses
She felt all the honest pride and complacency which her alliance with the present and future proprietor could fairly warrant,
complacency = satisfaction and contentment
DefinitionGenerally complacent means:
contented (unworried and satisfied) — often to a fault
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 3.1-2
Web Links
conciliatory
1 use
I am sure ... her fears will completely wear off, for there really is nothing in the manners of either but what is highly conciliating.
conciliating = tending to build trust
DefinitionGenerally conciliatory means:
intended to end bad feelings or build trust
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.15-16
Web Links
contrite
2 uses
In the warmth of true contrition, she would call upon her the very next morning, and it should be the beginning, on her side, of a regular, equal, kindly intercourse.
contrition = sorrow or regret for a fault or offense

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
DefinitionGenerally contrite means:
feeling sorrow or regret for a fault or offense
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.7-8
Web Links
countenance
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a pleasant countenance
...but your countenance testifies that your thoughts on this subject are very much like mine.
countenance = facial expression
DefinitionGenerally this sense of countenance means:
facial expression; or face; or composure or manner
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.7-8
Web Links
credulous
1 use
No lurking horrors were to upbraid him for his easy credulity.
credulity = gullibility (being too willing to believe)

(editor's note:  to upbraid is to scold or verbally criticize someone)
DefinitionGenerally credulous means:
gullible (being too willing to believe)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.5-6
Web Links
defer
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
deferred the decision
Oh! go to-day, go to-day. Do not defer it.
defer = postpone (put off until another time)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of defer means:
delay or postpone (hold off until a later time)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.5-6
Web Links
dilatory
1 use
He always moved with the alertness of a mind which could neither be undecided nor dilatory, but now he seemed more sudden than usual in his disappearance.
dilatory = slow
DefinitionGenerally dilatory means:
slow; or causing or tending to delay things
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.9-10
Web Links
expedient
5 uses
The longer she considered it, the greater was her sense of its expediency.
expediency = practicality or speediness
DefinitionGenerally expedient means:
a practical action — especially one that accepts negative tradeoffs due to circumstances

or:

convenient, speedy, or practical
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.3-4
Web Links
fastidious
2 uses
And he was really a very pleasing young man, a young man whom any woman not fastidious might like.
fastidious = giving careful attention to small details
DefinitionGenerally fastidious means:
giving careful attention to detail

or:

excessively concerned with cleanliness or matters of taste
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.3-4
Web Links
incessant
5 uses
engaging the housekeeper in incessant conversation
incessant = continuous
DefinitionGenerally incessant means:
continuous — often in an annoying way
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.9-10
Web Links
obscure
3 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
the view or directions are obscure
Oh! but dear Miss Woodhouse, she is now in such retirement, such obscurity, so thrown away.
obscurity = difficulty in understanding
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
not clearly seen, understood, or expressed
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 1.7-8
Web Links
ostentatious
2 uses
There would have been either the ostentation of a coxcomb, or the evasions of a mind too weak to defend its own vanities.
ostentation = actions intended to attract notice and impress others

(editor's note:  a coxcomb references vanity and/or something that might be worn to attract attention)
DefinitionGenerally ostentatious means:
intended to attract notice and impress others — especially with wealth in a vulgar way
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.7-8
Web Links
penury
1 use
And now to chuse the mortification of Mrs. Elton's notice and the penury of her conversation, rather than return to the superior companions who have always loved her with such real, generous affection.
penury = poverty (in this case, used figuratively)
DefinitionGenerally penury means:
a state of extreme poverty or destitution
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.15-16
Web Links
reprehensible
1 use
This amiable, upright, perfect Jane Fairfax was apparently cherishing very reprehensible feelings.
reprehensible = bad (worthy of criticism)
DefinitionGenerally reprehensible means:
bad — deserving severe criticism
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.9-10
Web Links
sagacious
1 use
...and were thinking of themselves, as the evening wonder in many a family circle, with great sagacity.
sagacity = wisdom
DefinitionGenerally sagacious means:
wise — especially through long experience and thoughtfulness
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.17-18
Web Links
scrupulous
4 uses
I thought her, on a thousand occasions, unnecessarily scrupulous and cautious:
scrupulous = extremely careful to do everything properly
DefinitionGenerally scrupulous means:
careful to behave ethically and/or diligently (with great care and attention to detail)
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1.15-16
Web Links
zeal
4 uses
admiring her drawings with so much zeal and so little knowledge
zeal = active interest and enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.13-14
Web Links
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