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David Copperfield

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
candid
4 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
your candid opinion
I candidly admitted to myself that she seemed to be an excellent kind of girl for Traddles, too.
candidly = with honesty and directness
DefinitionGenerally this sense of candid means:
honest and direct
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 13-15
Web Links
capricious
5 uses
I dare say I am a capricious fellow, David.
capricious = impulsive and unpredictable
DefinitionGenerally capricious means:
impulsive or unpredictable or tending to make sudden changes — especially impulsive behavior
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 19-21
Web Links
complacent
8 uses
Mr. Dick was so very complacent ... that I am sorry to say I was provoked into explaining to him that ruin meant distress, want, and starvation;
complacent = happily satisfied (too a fault)
DefinitionGenerally complacent means:
contented (unworried and satisfied) — often to a fault
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 34-36
Web Links
conciliatory
5 uses
He was so extremely conciliatory in his manner that he seemed to apologize to the very newspaper for taking the liberty of reading it.
conciliatory = a manner intended to avoid ill will with others
DefinitionGenerally conciliatory means:
intended to end bad feelings or build trust
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22-24
Web Links
defer
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
deferred to her wishes
I respectfully deferred to his opinion.
deferred = submitted (yielded)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of defer means:
submit or yield (typically to another person's opinion because of respect for that person or their knowledge)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 25-27
Web Links
digress
4 uses
'Perhaps not,' said Mr. Wickfield; 'and you bring me back to the question, with an apology for digressing.'
digressing = wandering away from the main topic
DefinitionGenerally digress means:
wander from a direct or straight course — typically verbally
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 16-18
Web Links
diligent
3 uses
I never could have done what I have done, without the habits of punctuality, order, and diligence, without...
diligence = hard work and care
DefinitionGenerally this sense of diligent means:
hard work and care in tasks — often continuing when others might quit because of difficulties
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 61-62
Web Links
disclaim
1 use
I was prevented from disclaiming the compliment (if I should have done so, in any case), by the entrance of Agnes, now ushered in by Mr. Micawber.
disclaiming = denying (worthiness of)
DefinitionGenerally disclaim means:
to deny (responsibility for, knowledge of, or ownership of)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 52-54
Web Links
disparage
9 uses
I found a great many foxes, disparaging whole vineyards of inaccessible grapes;
disparaging = criticizing or making seem less important

(editor's note:  this references Aesop's fable in which a fox cannot reach a bunch of grapes and so declares that they are not worth having anyway.)
DefinitionGenerally disparage means:
to criticize or make seem less important — especially in a disrespectful or contemptuous manner
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 7-9
Web Links
entreat
37 uses
I entreat Mr. Traddles to bear with me in entering into these details.
entreat = ask
DefinitionGenerally entreat means:
to ask — especially while trying hard to overcome resistance
Word Statistics
Book37 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 58-60
Web Links
expedient
9 uses
he seemed relieved by this expedient of the partnership, though at the same time he seemed hurt by it and ashamed of it.
expedient = a practical action
DefinitionGenerally expedient means:
a practical action — especially one that accepts negative tradeoffs due to circumstances

or:

convenient, speedy, or practical
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4-6
Web Links
fallacious
3 uses
This was small consolation, but Miss Mills wouldn't encourage fallacious hopes.
fallacious = mistaken (based on incorrect information or belief)
DefinitionGenerally fallacious means:
not correct
  • typically describing something as mistaken due to incorrect information or belief
  • sometimes describing something as an intentional lie
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 28-30
Web Links
novel
1 use
To have all those noble Romans alive before me, and walking in and out for my entertainment, instead of being the stern taskmasters they had been at school, was a most novel and delightful effect.
novel = new and original
DefinitionGenerally this sense of novel means:
new and original — typically something considered good
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 19-21
Web Links
perfidy
2 uses
I stood amazed at the revelation of all this perfidy, looking at Miss Mowcher as she walked up and down the kitchen until she was out of breath:
perfidy = deliberate betrayal
DefinitionGenerally perfidy means:
an act of deliberate betrayal; or such behavior
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 28-30
Web Links
prominent
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a prominent jaw
The gentleman spoken of was a gentleman with a very unpromising squint, and a prominent chin, who had a tall white hat on with a narrow flat brim, and whose close-fitting drab trousers seemed to button all the way up outside his legs from his boots to his hips.†
prominent = protruding (sticking out)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of prominent means:
sticking out and easily noticed
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 19-21
Web Links
recumbent
1 use
Here, recumbent on a small sofa, underneath a picture of a race-horse, with her head close to the fire, and her feet pushing the mustard off the dumb-waiter at the other end of the room, was Mrs. Micawber, to whom Mr. Micawber entered first, saying, 'My dear, allow me to introduce to you a pupil of Doctor Strong's.'
recumbent = lying down
DefinitionGenerally recumbent means:
lying down; or horizontal
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 16-18
Web Links
remonstrate
18 uses
'My dearest,' I remonstrated, 'don't talk preposterous nonsense!'
remonstrated = protested
DefinitionGenerally remonstrate means:
argue, complain, or criticize
Word Statistics
Book18 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 40-42
Web Links
repudiate
3 uses
Mr. Micawber sat in his elbow-chair, with his eyebrows raised; half receiving and half repudiating Mrs. Micawber's views...
repudiating = rejecting
DefinitionGenerally repudiate means:
strong rejection — especially when the idea or thing being rejected was once embraced
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 55-57
Web Links
simile
3 uses
He was but a poor man himself, said Peggotty, but as good as gold and as true as steel — those were her similes.
similes = expressions that highlight similarity between things of different kinds
DefinitionGenerally simile means:
a phrase that highlights similarity between things of different kinds — usually formed with "like" or "as"

as in "It's like looking for a needle in a haystack," or "She is as quiet as a mouse."
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1-3
Web Links
succession
8 uses
1  —8 uses as in:
a succession of events
To everybody in succession, Captain Hopkins said: 'Have you read it?'
succession = sequence (one after another)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of succession means:
series or sequence (one after another)
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10-12
Web Links
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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