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A Christmas Carol

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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caustic
1 use
said Scrooge, caustic and cold as ever.
caustic = sarcastic, critical, or harsh
DefinitionGenerally caustic means:
of a chemical substance:  corrosive; capable of destroying or eating away such as a strong acid

or:

of a person:  sarcastic, critical, or harsh
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
coherent
1 use
he became sensible of confused noises in the air; incoherent sounds of lamentation and regret;
incoherent = (mumblings that were) not sensible or understandable

(Editor's note:  The prefix "in-" in incoherent means not and reverses the meaning of coherent. This is the same pattern you see in words like invisible, incomplete, and insecure.)
DefinitionGenerally coherent means:
sensible and clear; or describing parts as fitting together in a consistent or pleasing manner
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
condescending
1 use
and in the hall appeared the schoolmaster himself, who glared on Master Scrooge with a ferocious condescension,
condescension = a manner that treats others as inferiors

(editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
DefinitionGenerally condescending means:
treating others as inferior; or doing something considered beneath one's position or dignity
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
deference
1 use
"You must have been very slow about it, Jacob," Scrooge observed, in a business-like manner, though with humility and deference.
deference = polite respect
DefinitionGenerally deference means:
polite respect — often when submitting to another's wishes
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
despondent
1 use
Not a latent echo in the house, ... not a sigh among the leafless boughs of one despondent poplar, ... but fell upon the heart of Scrooge with a softening influence, and gave a freer passage to his tears.
despondent = depressed
DefinitionGenerally despondent means:
emotionally depressed — especially a feeling of grief and hopelessness after a loss
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
entreat
3 uses
It sought to free itself, but he was strong in his entreaty, and detained it.
entreaty = request or persuasion
DefinitionGenerally entreat means:
to ask or attempt to persuade — especially while trying hard to overcome resistance
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
heresy
1 use
It would have been flat heresy to do so.
heresy = something immoral
DefinitionGenerally heresy means:
opinions or actions most people consider immoral
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
incessant
2 uses
ages of incessant labour by immortal creatures
incessant = continuous
DefinitionGenerally incessant means:
continuous — often in an annoying way
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
latent
2 uses
they had some latent moral for his own improvement
latent = potentially existing but not presently evident or active
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
morose
1 use
What reason have you to be morose?
morose = unhappy
DefinitionGenerally morose means:
unhappy — often with a withdrawn personality
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
obscure   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
it obscured my view
To see the dingy cloud come drooping down, obscuring everything, one might have thought that Nature lived hard by, and was brewing on a large scale.
obscuring = making less visible
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
to block from view or make less visible or understandable
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
knows the famous and the obscure
They left the busy scene, and went into an obscure part of the town, where Scrooge had never penetrated before,
obscure = not known to many people and undistinguished
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
not known to many people; or unimportant or undistinguished
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
penitent
1 use
Scrooge hung his head to hear his own words quoted by the Spirit, and was overcome with penitence and grief.
penitence = remorse (sorrow) for misdeeds
DefinitionGenerally penitent means:
feeling or expressing sorrow for having done wrong; or a person who does such
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
prodigious
1 use
in the middle of a prodigiously tough snore
prodigiously = far beyond what is usual in magnitude or degree
DefinitionGenerally prodigious means:
enormous; or far beyond what is usual in magnitude or degree
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
recumbent
1 use
The curtains of his bed were drawn aside; and Scrooge, starting up into a half-recumbent attitude, found himself face to face with the unearthly visitor who drew them: as close to it as I am now to you, and I am standing in the spirit at your elbow.
recumbent = lying down
DefinitionGenerally recumbent means:
lying down; or horizontal
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
remonstrate
1 use
"I am a mortal," Scrooge remonstrated, "and liable to fall."
remonstrated = argued in protest or opposition
DefinitionGenerally remonstrate means:
argue in protest or opposition
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
resolute
1 use
I am sorry, with all my heart, to find you so resolute.
resolute = firm in purpose or belief
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
simile
1 use
  Old Marley was as dead as a door-nail.
  ... I don't mean to say that I know, of my own knowledge, what there is particularly dead about a door-nail. I might have been inclined, myself, to regard a coffin-nail as the deadest piece of ironmongery in the trade. But the wisdom of our ancestors is in the simile; and my unhallowed hands shall not disturb it, or the Country's done for.
simile = an expression that highlights similarity between things of different kinds
DefinitionGenerally simile means:
a phrase that highlights similarity between things of different kinds — usually formed with "like" or "as"

as in "It's like looking for a needle in a haystack," or "She is as quiet as a mouse."
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
venerate
1 use
...the veneration due to its sacred name and origin,
veneration = feelings of respect and reverence

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
DefinitionGenerally venerate means:
regard with feelings of respect and reverence
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
zeal
1 use
said Mrs. Cratchit, kissing her a dozen times, and taking off her shawl and bonnet for her with officious zeal.
zeal = enthusiasm
DefinitionGenerally zeal means:
active interest and enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
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