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Anna Karenina

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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apathy
3 uses
"It's our Russian apathy," said Vronsky, pouring water from an iced decanter into a delicate glass on a high stem; "we've no sense of the duties our privileges impose upon us, and so we refuse to recognize these duties."
apathy = lack of interest and enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 5
Web Links
arbitration
1 use
...he maintains, for instance, that district councils and arbitration boards are all of no use, and he is unwilling to take part in anything.
arbitration = regarding the process of solving a disagreement with the help of an impartial referee
DefinitionGenerally arbitration means:
the process of solving a disagreement with the help of an impartial referee
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 6
Web Links
attribute
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
I attribute it to...
He always attributed to his critics a more profound comprehension than he had himself, and always expected from them something he did not himself see in the picture.
attributed = credited (pointed to as the cause of something)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of attribute means:
to credit (a source for something)
in two typical senses:
  • "I attribute it to her work." — to say who or what made something happen
  • "Remember to attribute any quotations in your paper." — indicate the source of a quotation or idea
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st usePart 5
Web Links
bronze   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 6 uses
1  —5 uses as in:
bronze won't corrode in salt water
With rapid, bony fingers he unbuttoned his coat, revealing a shirt, bronze waistcoat buttons, and a watch chain, and quickly pulled out a fat old pocketbook.
bronze = made of a shining yellowish metal
DefinitionGenerally this sense of bronze means:
a brownish-colored metal with red or yellow hues that is made of copper and (usually) tin
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 1
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
her bronze is on display
With what he had in his soul, he felt sore and uncomfortable in the restaurant, in the midst of private rooms where men were dining with ladies, in all this fuss and bustle; the surroundings of bronzes, looking glasses, gas, and waiters—all of it was offensive to him.†
bronzes = sculptures made of a brownish metal of the same name
DefinitionGenerally this sense of bronze means:
something made of the brownish metal with the same name — such as a sculpture (statue) or a third place medal
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 1
Web Links
candid
3 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
your candid opinion
And this lack of candor in a matter of such gravity infuriated him.
candor = honesty and directness
DefinitionGenerally this sense of candid means:
honest and direct
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st usePart 4
Web Links
capricious
3 uses
The family cannot be broken up by a whim, a caprice, or even by the sin of one of the partners in the marriage,
caprice = an impulsive act
DefinitionGenerally capricious means:
impulsive or unpredictable or tending to make sudden changes — especially impulsive behavior
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 2
Web Links
decorum
9 uses
there are certain rules of decorum which cannot be disregarded with impunity.
decorum = proper manners and conduct
DefinitionGenerally decorum means:
manners and conduct considered to be proper and in good taste
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 1
Web Links
dissent
4 uses
She said nothing, and shook her cropped head in dissent.
dissent = disagreement
DefinitionGenerally dissent means:
to disagree; or disagreement or conflict — typically between people who cooperate, and often with official or majority beliefs
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 7
Web Links
dubious
4 uses
And this was what caused his dubious, inquiring, sometimes hostile, expression,
dubious = doubtful or suspicious
DefinitionGenerally dubious means:
doubtful
in various senses, including:
  • doubtful that something should be relied upon — as in "The argument relies on a dubious assumption."
  • doubtful that something is morally proper — as in "The company is accused of using dubious sales practices to influence minors."
  • bad or of questionable value — as in "The state has the dubious distinction of the highest taxes."
  • doubtful or uncertain — as in "She is dubious about making the change."
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st usePart 2
Web Links
duplicity
1 use
She suddenly felt ashamed of her duplicity,
duplicity = deceit
DefinitionGenerally duplicity means:
deception (lying to or misleading others) — usually over an extended period
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 6
Web Links
enigma
3 uses
Levin tried to understand him, and could not understand him, and looked at him and his life as at a living enigma.
enigma = something mysterious that seems unexplainable
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3
Web Links
novel
2 uses
Several sections of this book and its introduction had appeared in periodical publications, and other parts had been read by Sergey Ivanovitch to persons of his circle, so that the leading ideas of the work could not be completely novel to the public.
novel = new and original
DefinitionGenerally this sense of novel means:
new and original — typically something considered good
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st usePart 6
Web Links
obscure
6 uses
1  —6 uses as in:
the view or directions are obscure
Didn't I understand those senseless words of Fyodor's?  And understanding them, did I doubt of their truth?  Did I think them stupid, obscure, inexact?  No, I understood him, and exactly as he understands the words.
obscure = difficult to understand (in this case, because each word is used with an exact meaning that might not be used by others)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
not clearly seen, understood, or expressed
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st usePart 3
Web Links
rectify
1 use
He saw just the same thing in the socialistic books: either they were the beautiful but impracticable fantasies which had fascinated him when he was a student, or they were attempts at improving, rectifying the economic position in which Europe was placed, with which the system of land tenure in Russia had nothing in common.
rectifying = fixing
DefinitionGenerally this sense of rectify means:
correct, fix, or make right
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3
Web Links
repudiate
1 use
In his own case, Alexey Alexandrovitch saw that a legal divorce, that is to say, one in which only the guilty wife would be repudiated, was impossible of attainment.
repudiated = strongly rejected
DefinitionGenerally repudiate means:
strong rejection — especially when the idea or thing being rejected was once embraced
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st usePart 3
Web Links
simile
2 uses
"How, how am I to tell you what I mean?" said Serpuhovskoy, who liked similes.
similes = expressions that highlight similarity between things of different kinds
DefinitionGenerally simile means:
a phrase that highlights similarity between things of different kinds — usually formed with "like" or "as"

as in "It's like looking for a needle in a haystack," or "She is as quiet as a mouse."
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3
Web Links
stagnate
2 uses
The complexity of Petersburg, as a rule, had a stimulating effect on him, rousing him out of his Moscow stagnation.
stagnation = lack of development

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
DefinitionGenerally stagnate means:
staying still or not developing
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 7
Web Links
vacillate
2 uses
When the relations of a couple are vacillating and neither one thing nor the other, no sort of enterprise can be undertaken.
vacillating = changing one's mind back and forth between conflicting ideas

or:

swaying back and forth
DefinitionGenerally vacillate means:
to change one's mind back and forth between conflicting ideas

or:

to sway back and forth
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 2
Web Links
zeal
4 uses
he had in these very projects of reform been serving the Lord more zealously than before.
zealously = with active interest and enthusiasm
DefinitionGenerally zeal means:
active interest and enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 5
Web Links
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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