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Middlemarch

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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aesthetic
1 use
Celia was playing an "air, with variations," a small kind of tinkling which symbolized the aesthetic part of the young ladies' education,
aesthetic = appreciation of beauty
DefinitionGenerally aesthetic means:
related to beauty or good taste — often referring to one's appreciation of beauty or one's sense of what is beautiful

or:

beautiful or tasteful
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
apprehend
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
apprehend the situation
"You have been led to this, I apprehend, by some slanders concerning me uttered by that unhappy creature," said Bulstrode, anxious now to know the utmost.†
apprehend = understand
DefinitionGenerally this sense of apprehend means:
to understand or perceive (see or become aware of)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
arbitration
1 use
In this way it came to his knowledge that Mr. Garth had carried the man to Stone Court in his gig; and Mr. Hawley in consequence took an opportunity of seeing Caleb, calling at his office to ask whether he had time to undertake an arbitration if it were required, and then asking him incidentally about Raffles.
arbitration = an official process of solving a disagreement with the help of an impartial referee
DefinitionGenerally arbitration means:
the process of solving a disagreement with the help of an impartial referee
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
bronze
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
bronze won't corrode in salt water
Our moods are apt to bring with them images which succeed each other like the magic-lantern pictures of a doze; and in certain states of dull forlornness Dorothea all her life continued to see the vastness of St. Peter's, the huge bronze canopy, the excited intention in the attitudes and garments of the prophets and evangelists in the mosaics above, and the red drapery which was being hung for Christmas spreading itself everywhere like a disease of the retina.
bronze = made of a brownish metal that turns greenish when weathered
DefinitionGenerally this sense of bronze means:
a brownish-colored metal with red or yellow hues that is made of copper and (usually) tin
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
capricious
7 uses
And all this was to have come ... in the shape of an old gentleman's caprice.
caprice = impulsive action
DefinitionGenerally capricious means:
impulsive or unpredictable or tending to make sudden changes — especially impulsive behavior
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
disclaim
1 use
I disclaim any personalities.
disclaim = deny
DefinitionGenerally disclaim means:
to deny (responsibility for, knowledge of, or ownership of)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
impetuous
18 uses
she burst forth in her most impetuous manner.
impetuous = impulsive (acting suddenly without much thought)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of impetuous means:
impulsive (acting suddenly without much thought) — often with an unfortunate consequence
Word Statistics
Book18 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
imply
48 uses
he put out his hand, as if to imply that the conversation was closed.
imply = communicate the idea without saying it directly that
DefinitionGenerally imply means:
to suggest or say indirectly — possibly as a logical consequence
Word Statistics
Book48 uses
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
incantation
2 uses
...as Voltaire said, incantations will destroy a flock of sheep if administered with a certain quantity of arsenic.
incantations = the saying of words or sounds believed to have a magical effect
DefinitionGenerally incantation means:
words believed to have a magical effect when they are said aloud; or the saying of such words
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
indecision
1 use
"I shall stay with Christy," observed Jim; as much as to say that he had the advantage of those simpletons; whereupon Letty put her hand up to her head and looked with jealous indecision from the one to the other.
indecision = inability to make a decision due to uncertainty
DefinitionGenerally indecision means:
leaving a decision unmade due to uncertainty; or a general tendency to leave decisions unmade
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
nominal
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a nominal fee
It is a gem, and 'Full many a gem,' as the poet says, has been allowed to go at a nominal price because the public knew no better, because...†
nominal = small
DefinitionGenerally this sense of nominal means:
insignificantly small
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
novel
1 use
He pronounced the last truly admirable word with the accent on the last syllable, not as unaware of vulgar usage, but feeling that this novel delivery enhanced the sonorous beauty which his reading had given to the whole.
novel = pleasantly new and original
DefinitionGenerally this sense of novel means:
new and original — typically something considered good
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
ostentatious
8 uses
nothing is more offensive than this ostentation of reform, where there is no real amelioration.
ostentation = actions intended to attract notice and impress others

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
DefinitionGenerally ostentatious means:
intended to attract notice and impress others — especially with wealth in a vulgar way
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
philanthropy
12 uses
I believe he is a sort of philanthropist,
philanthropist = someone who helps others — especially by donating money to worthy causes
DefinitionGenerally philanthropy means:
helping others — especially donating money to worthy causes; or an organization that does so
Word Statistics
Book12 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
reticent
13 uses
She showed her usual reticence to her parents, and only said, that if Lydgate had done as she wished he would have left Middlemarch long ago.
reticence = reluctance to speak freely
DefinitionGenerally reticent means:
reluctant — especially to speak freely
Word Statistics
Book13 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
scrupulous
16 uses
You have not implied to me that the symptoms which—I am bound to testify—you watched with scrupulous care, were those of a fatal disease.
scrupulous = diligent (attention to detail)
DefinitionGenerally scrupulous means:
careful to behave ethically and/or diligently (with great care and attention to detail)
Word Statistics
Book16 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
sensuous
4 uses
Riding was an indulgence which she allowed herself in spite of conscientious qualms; she felt that she enjoyed it in a pagan sensuous way, and always looked forward to renouncing it.
sensuous = relating to pleasure from the body's senses rather than from the intellect
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
speculative
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a speculative look or mind
He had no longer free energy enough for spontaneous research and speculative thinking, but by the bedside of patients, the direct external calls on his judgment and sympathies brought the added impulse needed to draw him out of himself.
speculative = arising from curiosity rather than need
DefinitionGenerally this sense of speculative means:
showing, engaged in, or having a tendency of curiosity or deep thought
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
succession
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
a succession of events
And now within all the automatic succession of theoretic phrases—distinct and inmost as the shiver and the ache of oncoming fever when we are discussing abstract pain, was the forecast of disgrace in the presence of his neighbors and of his own wife.
succession = series (one after another)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of succession means:
series or sequence (one after another)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
venerate
6 uses
he leaned on her young trust and veneration, he liked to draw forth her fresh interest in listening, as a means of encouragement to himself
veneration = feelings of respect and reverence

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
DefinitionGenerally venerate means:
regard with feelings of respect and reverence
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
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