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Macbeth
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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adage
1 use
Wouldst thou have that Which thou esteem'st the ornament of life, And live a coward in thine own esteem; Letting "I dare not" wait upon "I would," Like the poor cat i' the adage?†
adage = saying
DefinitionGenerally adage means:
an old saying considered wise by many; e.g., "Actions speak louder than words."
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 1.7
Web Links
appease
1 use
To offer up a weak, poor, innocent lamb
To appease an angry god.
appease = satisfy or pacify (make less angry)
DefinitionGenerally appease means:
satisfy or pacify (make less angry or upset) — typically by giving something wanted
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 4.3
Web Links
countenance
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a pleasant countenance
As from your graves rise up, and walk like sprites
To countenance this horror!
countenance = face (see or witness)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of countenance means:
facial expression; or face; or composure
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 2.1
Web Links
direct
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
depart directly
DOCTOR:  Will she go now to bed?
GENTLEWOMAN:  Directly.
directly = immediately
DefinitionGenerally this sense of direct means:
without delay, or in the quickest manner, or without going somewhere else first
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 5.1
Web Links
entreat
1 use
Yet, when we can entreat an hour to serve,
We would spend it in some words upon that business,
If you would grant the time.
entreat = persuade (or beg, or negotiate)

(editor's note:  No Fear Shakespeare paraphrases this as: "I don't think about them now. But when we have an hour to spare we can talk more about it, if you're willing.")
DefinitionGenerally entreat means:
to ask or attempt to persuade — especially while trying hard to overcome resistance
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 2.1
Web Links
exasperated
1 use
and this report hath so exasperate the king that he prepares for some attempt of war.
exasperate = greatly annoy
DefinitionGenerally exasperated means:
greatly annoyed
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library13 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 3.6
Web Links
exeunt
31 uses
[Exeunt all except Doctor.]
exeunt = stage direction:  characters exit from stage
Word Statistics
Book31 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 1.2
Web Links
grave
1 use
We should have else desir'd your good advice,—
Which still hath been both grave and prosperous,—
In this day's council; but we'll take to-morrow.
grave = wise (weighty) or respected or serious
DefinitionGenerally this sense of grave means:
serious and/or solemn
The exact meaning of this sense of grave can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "This is a grave problem," or "a situation of the utmost gravity." — important, dangerous, or causing worry
  • "She was in a grave mood upon returning from the funeral." — sad or solemn
  • "She looked me in the eye and gravely promised." — in a sincere and serious manner
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useScene 3.1
Web Links
integrity
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a person of high integrity
Macduff, this noble passion,
Child of integrity, hath from my soul
Wiped the black scruples, reconcil'd my thoughts
To thy good truth and honour.
integrity = having strong moral principles — especially honesty
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useScene 4.3
Web Links
malevolent
1 use
the malevolence of fortune
malevolence = exerting an evil or harmful influence
DefinitionGenerally malevolent means:
evil
  • of a person — wishing or appearing to wish evil to others
  • of a thing — exerting an evil or harmful influence
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 3.6
Web Links
oblivious
1 use
Canst thou not minister to a mind diseas'd; Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow; Raze out the written troubles of the brain; And with some sweet oblivious antidote Cleanse the stuff'd bosom of that perilous stuff Which weighs upon the heart?
oblivious = unaware of
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 5.3
Web Links
obscure
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
the view or directions are obscure
the obscure bird clamour'd the live-long night
obscure = not clearly seen

(editor's note:  an owl is referred to this way because it is hard to see as it flies in the night)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
not clearly seen, understood, or expressed
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useScene 2.1
Web Links
profound
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
profound idea
Upon the corner of the moon
There hangs a vaporous drop profound;
profound = with deep, far-reaching, hidden qualities
DefinitionGenerally this sense of profound means:
deep or far-reaching in intellect or consequence
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 3.5
Web Links
ratify
1 use
... thither Macduff
Is gone to pray the holy king, upon his aid
To wake Northumberland, and warlike Siward:
That, by the help of these,—with Him above
To ratify the work,—we may again
Give to our tables meat, sleep to our nights;
Free from our feasts and banquets bloody knives;
Do faithful homage, and receive free honours,
All which we pine for now: ...
ratify = approve
DefinitionGenerally ratify means:
to approve — typically the formal approval of an agreement by an organization
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 3.6
Web Links
reconcile
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
reconciled their differences
Such welcome and unwelcome things at once
'Tis hard to reconcile.
reconcile = bring into agreement in the mind (that opposite things should come together)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of reconcile means:
to bring into agreement
The exact meaning of reconcile can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "We reconciled our differences and are on friendly terms now." — settled or found a way to accept
  • "They did break up, but they reconciled since then." — made up
  • "I need to reconcile my goals with my abilities." — make compatible
  • "I need to reconcile my checkbook." — get the checkbook numbers and the bank statement to agree
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 4.3
Web Links
remorse
1 use
Stop up the access and passage to remorse,
remorse = deep regret for doing something that was wrong
DefinitionGenerally remorse means:
a feeling of deep regret for doing something that was wrong
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 1.5
Web Links
resolute
1 use
Be bloody, bold, and resolute;
resolute = firm in purpose or belief
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 4.1
Web Links
sacrilege
1 use
Most sacrilegious murder hath broke ope
The Lord's anointed temple, and stole thence
The life o' the building.
sacrilegious = disrespectful of something others consider important — especially something sacred
DefinitionGenerally sacrilege means:
disrespect of something others consider important or sacred
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 2.1
Web Links
tedious
1 use
Returning were as tedious as...
tedious = boring (hard to endure)
DefinitionGenerally tedious means:
boring — especially because something goes on too long or without variation
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 3.4
Web Links
usurp
1 use
the usurper's cursed head
usurper = one who seizes or takes control without authority
DefinitionGenerally usurp means:
seize or take control without authority
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 5.8
Web Links
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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