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Moby Dick

Extra Credit Words with Typical Sample Sentences

instructions
augment
5 uses
Our school hired a new counselor to augment our college counseling service.
augment = enlarge or increase
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 85-87
Web Links
capricious
5 uses
Nothing seems more capricious than a tornado.
capricious = unpredictable
DefinitionGenerally capricious means:
impulsive or unpredictable or tending to make sudden changes — especially impulsive behavior
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 52-54
Web Links
countenance
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a pleasant countenance
She has a pleasant countenance.
countenance = facial expression; or face
DefinitionGenerally this sense of countenance means:
facial expression; or face; or composure or manner
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 31-33
Web Links
credulous
8 uses
The trick would fool none but the most credulous.
credulous = gullible (being too willing to believe)
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 34-36
Web Links
desist
6 uses
The Federal Trade Commission ordered the company to cease-and-desist from making such claims.
desist = to not do something
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 52-54
Web Links
fallacious
1 use
She reached a false conclusion that was based on fallacious reasoning.
fallacious = mistaken (based on incorrect information or belief)
DefinitionGenerally fallacious means:
not correct
  • typically describing something as mistaken due to incorrect information or belief
  • sometimes describing something as an intentional lie
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 103-105
Web Links
grindstone
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
sharpen on a grindstone
Do you have a grindstone to sharpen the knife?
grindstone = a  disk shaped stone used to sharpen or polish
DefinitionGenerally this sense of grindstone means:
a  revolving disk-shaped stone used to grind (as when wheat is ground to flour), or used to sharpen or polish (as when sharpening a knife)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 16-18
Web Links
hypothesis
5 uses
1  —5 uses as in:
a study to test her hypothesis
The study will test the hypothesis that a good marriage is more important than a higher income when measuring happiness.
hypothesis = a seemingly reasonable, but unproven, idea
DefinitionGenerally this sense of hypothesis means:
a seemingly reasonable, but unproven idea or explanation based upon known facts
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 76-78
Web Links
indolent
9 uses
She never recovered from the indolence of her youth.
indolence = laziness
DefinitionGenerally this sense of indolent means:
lazy; disinclined to work
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 34-36
Web Links
nominal
6 uses
1  —6 uses as in:
he's nominally in charge
It was nominally written by the artist, but everyone suspects a ghostwriter did the bulk of the work.
nominally = in name only
DefinitionGenerally this sense of nominal means:
in form or name, but not in reality
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 31-33
Web Links
obscure   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 9 uses
1  —5 uses as in:
it obscured my view
The stars are obscured by the clouds.
obscured = hidden or made less visible
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
to block from view or make less visible or understandable
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 67-69
Web Links
2  —4 uses as in:
the view or directions are obscure
For some obscure reason that goes back many years, they don't like each other.
obscure = not clearly understood
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
not clearly seen, understood, or expressed
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 52-54
Web Links
ostentatious
7 uses
Although wealthy, the family is not ostentatious.
ostentatious = showy (trying to attract notice and impress others in a manner seen as in bad taste)
DefinitionGenerally ostentatious means:
intended to attract notice and impress others — especially with wealth in a vulgar way
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 34-36
Web Links
passage
4 uses
Each passage below is followed by a number of questions.
passage = a short part of a longer written work
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 61-63
Web Links
perfidy
2 uses
She is guilty of perfidy if not treason.
perfidy = an act of deliberate betrayal
DefinitionGenerally perfidy means:
an act of deliberate betrayal; or such behavior
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 49-51
Web Links
pious
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a good, pious woman
The cartoon with a drawing of Muhammad outraged many pious Muslims.
pious = highly religious
DefinitionGenerally this sense of pious means:
religious or highly moral
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 16-18
Web Links
recumbent
2 uses
She likes a recumbent bicycle.
recumbent = lying down (a bicycle ridden in a reclined position)
DefinitionGenerally recumbent means:
lying down; or horizontal
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10-12
Web Links
redundant
2 uses
What is clarifying for one reader can be a redundant distraction for another.
redundant = more than is needed
DefinitionGenerally redundant means:
more than is needed — often something that is unnecessarily repeated

or in technical usage:  a secondary component designed to work if the primary component fails; or of such a system
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 28-30
Web Links
remonstrate
5 uses
When she has a complaint with her staff, she will remonstrate quietly and in private.
remonstrate = criticize or argue
DefinitionGenerally remonstrate means:
argue, complain, or criticize
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 16-18
Web Links
reprehensible
1 use
Cheating is reprehensible.
reprehensible = bad — deserving criticism
DefinitionGenerally reprehensible means:
bad — deserving severe criticism
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 82-84
Web Links
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