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A Tale of Two Cities

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
acquiesce
2 uses
Defarge looked gloomily at his wife, and gave no other answer than a gruff sound of acquiescence.
acquiescence = reluctant compliance
DefinitionGenerally acquiesce means:
reluctant or unenthusiastic compliance, consent, or agreement
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.3
Web Links
alacrity
1 use
"I willingly obey the orders of my Chief," said The Vengeance with alacrity, and kissing her cheek.
alacrity = quickness; and/or cheerful eagerness
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.14
Web Links
aphorism
1 use
Altogether, the Old Bailey, at that date, was a choice illustration of the precept, that "Whatever is is right;" an aphorism that would be as final as it is lazy, did it not include the troublesome consequence, that nothing that ever was, was wrong.
aphorism = short saying intended to impart wisdom
DefinitionGenerally aphorism means:
a short saying intended to impart wisdom
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.2
Web Links
benevolent
2 uses
gifts bestowed upon him towards the execution of this benevolent purpose
benevolent = kind or generous
DefinitionGenerally benevolent means:
kind, generous, or charitable
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 3.8
Web Links
capricious
2 uses
So capriciously were the people moved, that tears immediately rolled down several ferocious countenances which had been glaring at the prisoner a moment before, as if with impatience to pluck him out into the streets and kill him.
capriciously = with impulsiveness that is hard to predict
DefinitionGenerally capricious means:
impulsive or unpredictable or tending to make sudden changes — especially impulsive behavior
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.6
Web Links
deplore
2 uses
Its deplorable peculiarity was, that it was the faintness of solitude and disuse.
deplorable = very bad or regrettable

(Editor's note:  The suffix "-able" means able to be. This is the same pattern you see in words like breakable, understandable, and comfortable.)
DefinitionGenerally deplore means:
strongly dislike or regret
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.6
Web Links
despondent
5 uses
Up one minute and down the next; now in spirits and now in despondency!
despondency = depression
DefinitionGenerally despondent means:
emotionally depressed — especially a feeling of grief and hopelessness after a loss
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.5
Web Links
disparage
2 uses
That, he (Mr. Attorney-General) was prepared to hear some disparagement attempted of this admirable servant; but that, in a general way, he preferred him to his (Mr. Attorney-General's) brothers and sisters, and honoured him more than his (Mr. Attorney-General's) father and mother.
disparagement = criticism
DefinitionGenerally disparage means:
to criticize or make seem less important — especially in a disrespectful or contemptuous manner
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 2.3
Web Links
eccentric
4 uses
From these pilgrimages to the jug and basin, he returned with such eccentricities of damp headgear as no words can describe; which were made the more ludicrous by his anxious gravity.
eccentricities = things reflecting unconventional or strange behavior
DefinitionGenerally eccentric means:
unconventional or strange; or a person with such traits
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 2.5
Web Links
epicure
1 use
Ogre that he was, he spoke like an epicure.
epicure = a person devoted to a refined taste for food
DefinitionGenerally epicure means:
a person who loves fine food and drink
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.14
Web Links
incessant
3 uses
The footsteps were incessant, and the hurry of them became more and more rapid.
incessant = continuous (never stopping)
DefinitionGenerally incessant means:
continuous — often in an annoying way
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.14
Web Links
lethargic
3 uses
He had gradually dropped to the floor, and lay there in a lethargy, worn out.
lethargy = a state with a lack of energy
DefinitionGenerally lethargic means:
lacking energy
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.17
Web Links
obstinate
3 uses
But it is the obstinate custom of such creatures hardly ever to say what is set down for them.
obstinate = stubbornly not doing what others want
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.1
Web Links
olfactory
1 use
Monsieur Defarge's olfactory sense was by no means delicate, but the stock of wine smelt much stronger than it ever tasted, and so did the stock of rum and brandy and aniseed.
olfactory = smelling
DefinitionGenerally olfactory means:
relating to the sense of smell
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.16
Web Links
ostentatious
3 uses
Mr. Cruncher could not be restrained from making rather an ostentatious parade of his...
ostentatious = intended to attract notice and impress others
DefinitionGenerally ostentatious means:
intended to attract notice and impress others — especially with wealth in a vulgar way
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.8
Web Links
redundant
1 use
a little man with a redundancy of gesture
redundancy = more than is needed
DefinitionGenerally redundant means:
more than is needed — often something that is unnecessarily repeated

or in technical usage:  a secondary component designed to work if the primary component fails; or of such a system
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 3.5
Web Links
repudiate
1 use
But, the same consideration that suggested him, repudiated him; he lived in the most violent Quarter, and doubtless was influential there, and deep in its dangerous workings.
repudiated = strongly rejected
DefinitionGenerally repudiate means:
strong rejection — especially when the idea or thing being rejected was once embraced
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 3.3
Web Links
sagacious
4 uses
If your sagacity, knowledge, and experience, could put me on the right track, I might be able to do so much; unenlightened and undirected, I can do so little.
sagacity = wisdom — especially through long experience and thoughtfulness
DefinitionGenerally sagacious means:
wise — especially through long experience and thoughtfulness
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.4
Web Links
servile
1 use
Then, what submission, what cringing and fawning, what servility, what abject humiliation!
servility = behavior of someone who is so excessively submissive or eager to please that they seem to lack self-respect
DefinitionGenerally servile means:
submissive — typically excessively so (so submissive or eager to serve and please that one seems to have no self-respect)

or:

relating to the work that requires obeying demeaning commands

or:

slave-like or relating to slaves
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.7
Web Links
soliloquy
1 use
"I hope there ain't, but I can't make so 'Nation sure of that," said the guard, in gruff soliloquy.
soliloquy = a speech you make to yourself or as a long uninterrupted part of a conversation
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.2
Web Links
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