toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Book Menu

A Tale of Two Cities
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

(click/touch triangles for details)
acquiesce
2 uses
Defarge looked gloomily at his wife, and gave no other answer than a gruff sound of acquiescence.
acquiescence = reluctant compliance
DefinitionGenerally acquiesce means:
reluctant or unenthusiastic compliance, consent, or agreement
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.3
Web Links
augment
1 use
...it was she of all the world who must uphold him in his misery and not augment it,
augment = enlarge or increase
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.11
Web Links
belligerent
1 use
At last, after several hours, when sundry summer-houses had been pulled down, and some area-railings had been torn up, to arm the more belligerent spirits, a rumour got about that the Guards were coming.
belligerent = hostile (eager to fight)
DefinitionGenerally belligerent means:
hostile (the attitude of one eager to fight); or one already engaged in a fight or war
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.14
Web Links
benevolent
2 uses
gifts bestowed upon him towards the execution of this benevolent purpose
benevolent = kind or generous
DefinitionGenerally benevolent means:
kind, generous, or charitable
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.8
Web Links
capricious
2 uses
So capriciously were the people moved, that tears immediately rolled down several ferocious countenances which had been glaring at the prisoner a moment before, as if with impatience to pluck him out into the streets and kill him.
capriciously = with impulsiveness that is hard to predict
DefinitionGenerally capricious means:
impulsive or unpredictable or tending to make sudden changes — especially impulsive behavior
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.6
Web Links
complacent
4 uses
Sydney Carton looked at his punch and looked at his complacent friend;
complacent = contented (unworried and happy)
DefinitionGenerally complacent means:
contented (unworried and satisfied) — often to a fault
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2.16
Web Links
deference
5 uses
with less internal deference than he made an outward show of
deference = polite respect
DefinitionGenerally deference means:
polite respect — often when submitting to another's wishes
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2.10
Web Links
despondent
5 uses
Up one minute and down the next; now in spirits and now in despondency!
despondency = depression
DefinitionGenerally despondent means:
emotionally depressed — especially a feeling of grief and hopelessness after a loss
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.5
Web Links
disparage
2 uses
That, he (Mr. Attorney-General) was prepared to hear some disparagement attempted of this admirable servant; but that, in a general way, he preferred him to his (Mr. Attorney-General's) brothers and sisters, and honoured him more than his (Mr. Attorney-General's) father and mother.
disparagement = criticism
DefinitionGenerally disparage means:
to criticize or make seem less important — especially in a disrespectful or contemptuous manner
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2.3
Web Links
dubious
4 uses
Mr. Cruncher was soothed, but shook his head in a dubious and moral way.
dubious = doubtful or suspicious
DefinitionGenerally dubious means:
doubtful
in various senses, including:
  • doubtful that something should be relied upon — as in "The argument relies on a dubious assumption."
  • doubtful that something is morally proper — as in "The company is accused of using dubious sales practices to influence minors."
  • bad or of questionable value — as in "The state has the dubious distinction of the highest taxes."
  • doubtful or uncertain — as in "She is dubious about making the change."
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2.12
Web Links
eccentric
4 uses
From these pilgrimages to the jug and basin, he returned with such eccentricities of damp headgear as no words can describe; which were made the more ludicrous by his anxious gravity.
eccentricities = things reflecting unconventional or strange behavior
DefinitionGenerally eccentric means:
unconventional or strange; or a person with such traits
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.5
Web Links
furtive
2 uses
...asked the man, in a furtive, frightened way.
furtive = cautious
DefinitionGenerally furtive means:
taking pains to avoid being observed

or:

in a manner indicating nervousness (being cautious or appearing suspicious)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.18
Web Links
incessant
3 uses
The footsteps were incessant, and the hurry of them became more and more rapid.
incessant = continuous (never stopping)
DefinitionGenerally incessant means:
continuous — often in an annoying way
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.14
Web Links
latent
5 uses
The latent uneasiness in Darnay's mind was roused to vigourous life by this letter.
latent = potentially existing but not presently active
DefinitionGenerally latent means:
potentially existing but not presently evident or active
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.24
Web Links
lethargic
3 uses
He had gradually dropped to the floor, and lay there in a lethargy, worn out.
lethargy = a state with a lack of energy
DefinitionGenerally lethargic means:
lacking energy
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.17
Web Links
obstinate
3 uses
But it is the obstinate custom of such creatures hardly ever to say what is set down for them.
obstinate = stubbornly not doing what others want
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.1
Web Links
ostentatious
3 uses
Mr. Cruncher could not be restrained from making rather an ostentatious parade of his...
ostentatious = intended to attract notice and impress others
DefinitionGenerally ostentatious means:
intended to attract notice and impress others — especially with wealth in a vulgar way
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.8
Web Links
servile
1 use
Then, what submission, what cringing and fawning, what servility, what abject humiliation!
servility = behavior of someone who is so excessively submissive or eager to please that they seem to lack self-respect
DefinitionGenerally servile means:
submissive — typically excessively so (so submissive or eager to serve and please that one seems to have no self-respect)

or:

relating to the work that requires obeying demeaning commands

or:

slave-like or relating to slaves
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.7
Web Links
soliloquy
1 use
"I hope there ain't, but I can't make so 'Nation sure of that," said the guard, in gruff soliloquy.
soliloquy = a speech you make to yourself or as a long uninterrupted part of a conversation
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.2
Web Links
transitory
1 use
Many a night he vaguely and unhappily wandered there, when wine had brought no transitory gladness to him;
transitory = lasting a short time
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.13
Web Links
Take Quiz
Go to Book Menu
Browse with Large-Screen
(more words/choices)
SAT® is a registered trademark of the College Board, which is not affiliated with verbalworkout.com™, and does not endorse this site.