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A Tale of Two Cities

Extra Credit Words with Typical Sample Sentences

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acquiesce
2 uses
She is opposed, but will ultimately acquiesce to the will of the majority.
acquiesce = reluctantly accept
DefinitionGenerally acquiesce means:
reluctant or unenthusiastic compliance, consent, or agreement
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.3
Web Links
attribute
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
I attribute it to...
She attributed this quotation to Shakespeare.
attributed = credited (pointed to as the source of)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of attribute means:
to credit (a source for something)
in two typical senses:
  • "I attribute it to her work." — to say who or what made something happen
  • "Remember to attribute any quotations in your paper." — indicate the source of a quotation or idea
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 2.13
Web Links
benevolent
2 uses
They called themselves The Benevolent Association because their mission was to help others.
benevolent = kind, generous, or charitable
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 3.8
Web Links
complacent
4 uses
She had become complacent after years of success.
complacent = unworried and satisfied
DefinitionGenerally complacent means:
contented (unworried and satisfied) — often to a fault
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2.16
Web Links
deference
5 uses
They changed their strategy in deference to the President's wishes.
deference = respect
DefinitionGenerally deference means:
polite respect — often when submitting to another's wishes
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 2.10
Web Links
despondent
5 uses
When her mother died, she was so despondent it was hard for her to get out of bed.
despondent = depressed
DefinitionGenerally despondent means:
emotionally depressed — especially a feeling of grief and hopelessness after a loss
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.5
Web Links
disparage
2 uses
She has a reputation for disparaging the efforts of her co-workers.
disparaging = criticizing or making seem less important
DefinitionGenerally disparage means:
to criticize or make seem less important — especially in a disrespectful or contemptuous manner
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2.3
Web Links
dubious
4 uses
She was dubious, but agreed to come with us anyway.
dubious = doubtful; or suspicious; or full of uncertainty
DefinitionGenerally dubious means:
doubtful
in various senses, including:
  • doubtful that something should be relied upon — as in "The argument relies on a dubious assumption."
  • doubtful that something is morally proper — as in "The company is accused of using dubious sales practices to influence minors."
  • bad or of questionable value — as in "The state has the dubious distinction of the highest taxes."
  • doubtful or uncertain — as in "She is dubious about making the change."
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 2.12
Web Links
eccentric
4 uses
She's a little eccentric, but we don't mind because she's the best player on the team.
eccentric = unconventional or strange
DefinitionGenerally eccentric means:
unconventional or strange; or a person with such traits
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 2.5
Web Links
incessant
3 uses
She grew annoyed by the child's incessant questions.
incessant = continuous
DefinitionGenerally incessant means:
continuous — often in an annoying way
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.14
Web Links
latent
5 uses
She is unschooled, but I think she has latent talent as an engineer.
latent = potentially existing but not presently active
DefinitionGenerally latent means:
potentially existing but not presently evident or active
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.24
Web Links
lethargic
3 uses
I'm hoping a cold iced tea will help me get past this lethargic feeling.
lethargic = lacking energy
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.17
Web Links
obscure
12 uses
1  —6 uses as in:
was obscure, but now bright
The once shiny silver was now tarnished and obscure.
obscure = dark, dingy, or inconspicuous
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
dark or dingy; or inconspicuous (not very noticeable)
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.4
Web Links
unquizzed meaning  —6 uses
obstinate
3 uses
She is an obstinate child who will not follow the family rules.
obstinate = stubbornly not doing what others want
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.1
Web Links
olfactory
1 use
Dogs bred for scent-based tasks have higher olfactory capacities than other dogs.
olfactory = relating to the sense of smell
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.16
Web Links
ostentatious
3 uses
Although wealthy, the family is not ostentatious.
ostentatious = showy (trying to attract notice and impress others in a manner seen as in bad taste)
DefinitionGenerally ostentatious means:
intended to attract notice and impress others — especially with wealth in a vulgar way
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.8
Web Links
redundant
1 use
What is clarifying for one reader can be a redundant distraction for another.
redundant = more than is needed
DefinitionGenerally redundant means:
more than is needed — often something that is unnecessarily repeated

or in technical usage:  a secondary component designed to work if the primary component fails; or of such a system
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 3.5
Web Links
servile
1 use
We expect our waiters to give world-class service, but not to be so servile they sacrifice their human dignity.
servile = excessively submissive
DefinitionGenerally servile means:
submissive — typically excessively so (so submissive or eager to serve and please that one seems to have no self-respect)

or:

relating to the work that requires obeying demeaning commands

or:

slave-like or relating to slaves
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.7
Web Links
soliloquy
1 use
Perhaps the best known soliloquy is written by Shakespeare in Hamlet:  "To be, or not to be: that is the question..."
soliloquy = a speech you make to yourself
DefinitionGenerally soliloquy means:
a speech you make to yourself or as a long uninterrupted part of a conversation
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.2
Web Links
transitory
1 use
Do not be concerned about mild, transitory symptoms.
transitory = lasting a short time
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.13
Web Links
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