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Pride and Prejudice
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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acquaint
27 uses
This Mrs. Younge was, he knew, intimately acquainted with Wickham; and he went to her for intelligence of him as soon as he got to town.
acquainted = familiar
DefinitionGenerally acquaint means:
to cause to know; or to cause to be familiar with
Word Statistics
Book27 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 44
Web Links
amiable
36 uses
He is perfectly amiable.
amiable = friendly and kindly
Word Statistics
Book36 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
attribute
10 uses
1  —10 uses as in:
I attribute it to...
Something, he supposed, might be attributed to his connection with them, but yet he had never met with so much attention in the whole course of his life.
attributed = credited (pointed to as the cause of something)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of attribute means:
to credit (a source for something) — such as:
  • to say that something happened because of someone or something else
  • to indicate the source of an idea or quotation
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 24
Web Links
condescending
15 uses
Her ladyship, with great condescension, arose to receive them;
condescension = doing something considered beneath one's position or dignity
DefinitionGenerally condescending means:
treating others as inferior; or doing something considered beneath one's position or dignity
Word Statistics
Book15 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 48
Web Links
conjecture
15 uses
It was a painful, but not an improbable, conjecture.
conjecture = conclusion or opinion based on inconclusive evidence
DefinitionGenerally conjecture means:
a conclusion or opinion based on inconclusive evidence; or the act of forming of such a conclusion or opinion
Word Statistics
Book15 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
countenance   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
a pleasant countenance
Elizabeth admired the command of countenance with which...
countenance = facial expression
DefinitionGenerally this sense of countenance means:
facial expression; or face; or composure
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 28
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
giving countenance
...affording her their personal protection and countenance, is such a sacrifice to her advantage...
countenance = acceptance
DefinitionGenerally this sense of countenance means:
to tolerate, approve, or show favor or support
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 49
Web Links
dispose   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
disposed the troops along...
She has been allowed to dispose of her time in the most idle and frivolous manner, and to adopt any opinions that came in her way.
dispose = use up
DefinitionGenerally this sense of dispose means:
to arrange, position, or use things
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 47
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
Is she disposed to help?
He paused in hopes of an answer; but his companion was not disposed to make any; and Elizabeth at that instant moving towards them, he was struck with the action of doing a very gallant thing, and called out to her: "My dear Miss Eliza, why are you not dancing?"
disposed = inclined (or motivated)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of dispose means:
inclined (with a tendency to; or in the mood to)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
duplicity
2 uses
If I were not afraid of judging harshly, I should be almost tempted to say that there is a strong appearance of duplicity in all this.
duplicity = deception
DefinitionGenerally duplicity means:
deception (lying to or misleading others) — usually over an extended period
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 26
Web Links
entreat
20 uses
I entreat you not to suppose that I moved this way in order to beg for a partner.
entreat = ask
DefinitionGenerally entreat means:
to ask or attempt to persuade — especially while trying hard to overcome resistance
Word Statistics
Book20 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
gratification
23 uses
Do not imagine, Miss Bennet, that your ambition will ever be gratified.
gratified = having received what was desired
DefinitionGenerally gratification means:
great satisfaction (pleasure)
Word Statistics
Book23 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 16
Web Links
hackneyed
1 use
But that expression of "violently in love" is so hackneyed, so doubtful, so indefinite, that it gives me very little idea.
hackneyed = lacking in impact due to too much previous exposure
DefinitionGenerally hackneyed means:
lacking impact due to too much previous exposure — especially writing that is unimaginative and filled with overused expressions, ideas, and formulas
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 25
Web Links
illustrate
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
as illustrated by this example
  "May I ask to what these questions tend?"
  "Merely to the illustration of your character," said she, endeavouring to shake off her gravity. "I am trying to make it out."†
illustration = something that helps clarify or demonstrate
DefinitionGenerally this sense of illustrate means:
to help make clear — typically by example
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
oblige   (3 meanings)
3 meanings, 40 uses
1  —26 uses as in:
I am obliged by law.
Mr. Bingley was obliged to be in town the following day, and, consequently, unable to accept the honour of their invitation, etc.
obliged = required (obligated) to do something
DefinitionGenerally this sense of oblige means:
require (obligate) to do something
Word Statistics
Book26 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
2  —10 uses as in:
I obliged her every request.
The house, furniture, neighbourhood, and roads, were all to her taste, and Lady Catherine's behaviour was most friendly and obliging.
obliging = helpful
DefinitionGenerally this sense of oblige means:
grant a favor to someone
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
3  —4 uses as in:
I'm much obliged for your kindness
"I am much obliged to your ladyship for your kind invitation," replied Elizabeth, "but it is not in my power to accept it."
obliged = grateful or indebted
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22
Web Links
passage
3 uses
I will read you the passage which particularly hurts me.†
passage = a short part of a longer written work
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 21
Web Links
reprehensible
3 uses
She could only imagine, however, at last that she drew his notice because there was something more wrong and reprehensible, according to his ideas of right, than in any other person present.
reprehensible = bad and unacceptable
DefinitionGenerally reprehensible means:
bad and unacceptable — deserving severe criticism
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
sagacious
1 use
Young ladies have great penetration in such matters as these; but I think I may defy even your sagacity, to discover the name of your admirer.
sagacity = wisdom
DefinitionGenerally sagacious means:
wise — especially through long experience and thoughtfulness
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 57
Web Links
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