toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Book Menu

Pride and Prejudice

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
acquaint
28 uses
This Mrs. Younge was, he knew, intimately acquainted with Wickham; and he went to her for intelligence of him as soon as he got to town.
acquainted = familiar
DefinitionGenerally acquaint means:
to cause to know; or to cause to be familiar with
Word Statistics
Book28 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 44
Web Links
acrimony
1 use
It was gratitude; gratitude, not merely for having once loved her, but for loving her still well enough to forgive all the petulance and acrimony of her manner in rejecting him, and all the unjust accusations accompanying her rejection.
acrimony = anger
DefinitionGenerally acrimony means:
anger—often accompanied by bitterness
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 44
Web Links
amiable
36 uses
He is perfectly amiable.
amiable = friendly, agreeable, and likable
Word Statistics
Book36 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
apprehend
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
apprehend misfortune
They agree with me in apprehending that this false step in one daughter will be injurious to the fortunes of all the others; for who, as Lady Catherine herself condescendingly says, will connect themselves with such a family?†
apprehending = fearing
DefinitionGenerally this sense of apprehend means:
fear, or anticipate with worry
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 48
Web Links
attribute
10 uses
1  —10 uses as in:
I attribute it to...
Something, he supposed, might be attributed to his connection with them, but yet he had never met with so much attention in the whole course of his life.
attributed = credited (pointed to as the cause of something)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of attribute means:
to credit (a source for something)
in two typical senses:
  • "I attribute it to her work." — to say who or what made something happen
  • "Remember to attribute any quotations in your paper." — indicate the source of a quotation or idea
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 24
Web Links
countenance   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
a pleasant countenance
Elizabeth admired the command of countenance with which...
countenance = facial expression
DefinitionGenerally this sense of countenance means:
facial expression; or face; or composure or manner
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 28
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
giving countenance
...affording her their personal protection and countenance, is such a sacrifice to her advantage...
countenance = acceptance
DefinitionGenerally this sense of countenance means:
to tolerate, approve, or show favor or support
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 49
Web Links
dilatory
2 uses
His family knew him to be, on all common occasions, a most negligent and dilatory correspondent; but at such a time they had hoped for exertion.
dilatory = slow
DefinitionGenerally dilatory means:
slow; or causing or tending to delay things
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 48
Web Links
dissemble
1 use
You can hardly doubt the purport of my discourse, however your natural delicacy may lead you to dissemble; my attentions have been too marked to be mistaken.
dissemble = hide or disguise the truth
DefinitionGenerally dissemble means:
hide or disguise the truth without outright lying
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 19
Web Links
duplicity
2 uses
If I were not afraid of judging harshly, I should be almost tempted to say that there is a strong appearance of duplicity in all this.
duplicity = deception
DefinitionGenerally duplicity means:
deception (lying to or misleading others) — usually over an extended period
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 26
Web Links
hackneyed
1 use
But that expression of "violently in love" is so hackneyed, so doubtful, so indefinite, that it gives me very little idea.
hackneyed = lacking in impact due to too much previous exposure
DefinitionGenerally hackneyed means:
lacking impact due to too much previous exposure — especially writing that is unimaginative and filled with overused expressions, ideas, and formulas
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 25
Web Links
illustrate
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
as illustrated by this example
  "May I ask to what these questions tend?"
  "Merely to the illustration of your character," said she, endeavouring to shake off her gravity. "I am trying to make it out."†
illustration = something that helps clarify or demonstrate

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of illustrate means:
to help make clear — typically by example
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
nominal
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
he's nominally in charge
...and there he would continue, nominally engaged with one of the largest folios in the collection, but really talking to Mr. Bennet, with little cessation, of his house and garden at Hunsford.†
nominally = officially
DefinitionGenerally this sense of nominal means:
in form or name, but not in reality
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 15
Web Links
oblige   (3 meanings)
3 meanings, 42 uses
1  —26 uses as in:
I am obliged by law.
Mr. Bingley was obliged to be in town the following day, and, consequently, unable to accept the honour of their invitation, etc.
obliged = required (to do something)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of oblige means:
require (obligate) to do something
Word Statistics
Book26 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
2  —12 uses as in:
I obliged her every request.
The house, furniture, neighbourhood, and roads, were all to her taste, and Lady Catherine's behaviour was most friendly and obliging.
obliging = helpful
DefinitionGenerally this sense of oblige means:
grant a favor to someone
Word Statistics
Book12 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
3  —4 uses as in:
I'm much obliged for your kindness
"I am much obliged to your ladyship for your kind invitation," replied Elizabeth, "but it is not in my power to accept it."
obliged = grateful or indebted
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22
Web Links
pedantic
1 use
Mary had neither genius nor taste; and though vanity had given her application, it had given her likewise a pedantic air and conceited manner, which would have injured a higher degree of excellence than she had reached.
pedantic = excessive concern with book learning
DefinitionGenerally pedantic means:
too concerned with formal rules, details, or book learning
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
reprehensible
3 uses
She could only imagine, however, at last that she drew his notice because there was something more wrong and reprehensible, according to his ideas of right, than in any other person present.
reprehensible = bad and unacceptable
DefinitionGenerally reprehensible means:
bad — deserving severe criticism
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
sagacious
1 use
Young ladies have great penetration in such matters as these; but I think I may defy even your sagacity, to discover the name of your admirer.
sagacity = wisdom
DefinitionGenerally sagacious means:
wise — especially through long experience and thoughtfulness
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 57
Web Links
waive
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
waive the right
In as short a time as Mr. Collins's long speeches would allow, everything was settled between them to the satisfaction of both; and as they entered the house he earnestly entreated her to name the day that was to make him the happiest of men; and though such a solicitation must be waived for the present, the lady felt no inclination to trifle with his happiness.
waived = not insisted on
DefinitionGenerally this sense of waive means:
not enforce something to which one would otherwise be entitled
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22
Web Links
Go to Book Menu
Take Pre-Reading Quiz
† 
Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
SAT® is a registered trademark of the College Board, which is not affiliated with verbalworkout.com™, and does not endorse this site.