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Of Mice and Men

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
apprehension
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
apprehension about finals
Lennie's face wrinkled with apprehension.
apprehension = worry
From page 72.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of apprehension means:
worry about what is to come
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 4, p.72.1
Web Links
avert
1 use
For a moment she stood over him as though waiting for him to move so that she could whip at him again; but Crooks sat perfectly still, his eyes averted, everything that might be hurt drawn in.
averted = turned aside
From page 81.3  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally avert means:
prevent from happening

or:

turn away or aside — often to turn your eyes away from something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4, p.81.3
Web Links
belligerent
1 use
Now Lennie retorted belligerently, "He ain't neither. George won't do nothing like that. ... He's nice to me."
belligerently = in a hostile manner
From page 102.5  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally belligerent means:
hostile (the attitude of one eager to fight); or one already engaged in a fight or war
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6, p.102.5
Web Links
console
1 use
  "I was jus' playin' with him... an' he made like he's gonna bite me... an' I made like I was gonna smack him... an'... an' I done it. An' then he was dead."
  She consoled him. "Don't you worry none. He was jus' a mutt. You can get another one easy. The whole country is fulla mutts."
consoled = comforted
From page 87.5  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of console means:
to comfort (emotionally)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5, p.87.5
Web Links
contempt
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
feels contempt towards her
"Awright," she said contemptuously. "Awright, cover 'im up if ya wanta. Whatta I care? You bindle bums think you're so damn good."
contemptuously = disrespectfully

(editor's note:  Bimble bum is a derogatory way of referring to a migrant worker.)
From page 78.6  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contempt means:
lack of respect for someone or something thought inferior — often accompanied by a feeling of dislike or disgust
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4, p.78.6
Web Links
cower
1 use
Suddenly Lennie let go his hold. He crouched cowering against the wall.
cowering = showing fear
From page 64.2  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally cower means:
show fear by positioning the body as though afraid of being hit
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.64.2
Web Links
decisive
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a decisive decision maker
His tone grew decisive.
decisive = indicating a firm decision
From page 30.3  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of decisive means:
making quick decisions and sticking by them
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2, p.30.3
Web Links
deride
1 use
Through the open door came the thuds and occasional clangs of a horseshoe game, and now and then the sound of voices raised in approval or derision.
derision = making fun of someone's error or lack of skill

(editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
From page 38.2  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
to criticize with strong disrespect — often
with humor
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.38.2
Web Links
derogatory
1 use
He had drawn a derogatory statement from George.
derogatory = expressing disrespect or criticism
From page 27.9  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2, p.27.9
Web Links
ego
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
bruised her ego
  "I could get you strung up on a tree so easy it ain't even funny."
  Crooks had reduced himself to nothing. There was no personality, no ego—nothing to arouse either like or dislike.
ego = self-esteem (sense of importance)
From page 81.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of ego means:
one's sense of self-esteem (sense of importance or ability)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4, p.81.1
Web Links
imperious
1 use
  "I didn't steal it. I found it lyin' right beside the road."
  George's hand remained outstretched imperiously.
imperiously = in a manner that expects obedience
From page 9.2  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally imperious means:
expecting obedience; or arrogant; or domineering
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.9.2
Web Links
meager
1 use
In the stable buck's room a small electric globe threw a meager yellow light.
meager = lacking in quantity or quality
From page 67.7  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4, p.67.7
Web Links
ominous
1 use
He said ominously, "Well, he better watch out for Lennie. Lennie ain't no fighter, but Lennie's strong and quick and Lennie don't know no rules."
ominously = warning of danger
From page 27.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally ominous means:
threatening (suggestive of, or foreshadowing bad things to come)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2, p.27.1
Web Links
pantomime
1 use
But Lennie made an elaborate pantomime of innocence. "What mouse, George? I ain't got no mouse."
pantomime = expression of something through gestures of the body
From page 8.8  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally pantomime means:
a performance or expression of something through gestures and body movements without words
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.8.8
Web Links
plaintive
1 use
"I don't want no trouble," he said plaintively. "Don't let him sock me, George."
plaintively = in a pleading manner (almost begging)
From page 29.5  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally plaintive means:
expressing sadness — sometimes with a plea for help
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2, p.29.5
Web Links
rapt
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
rapt with love
"An' we'd keep a few pigeons to go flyin' around the win'mill like they done when I was a kid." He looked raptly at the wall over Lennie's head. "An' it'd be our own, an' nobody could can us."
raptly = filled with pleasure
From page 58.6  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of rapt means:
deeply moved or filled with intense pleasure
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.58.6
Web Links
reprehensible
1 use
When Candy spoke they both jumped as though they had been caught doing something reprehensible.
reprehensible = bad
From page 59  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally reprehensible means:
bad — deserving severe criticism
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.59
Web Links
resignation
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
accepted it with resignation
  "What you want of a dead mouse, anyways?"
  "I could pet it with my thumb while we walked along," said Lennie.
  "Well, you ain't petting no mice while you walk with me. You remember where we're goin' now?"
  Lennie looked startled and then in embarrassment hid his face against his knees. "I forgot again."
  "Jesus Christ," George said resignedly.
resignedly = in a way that indicated he had accepted something unpleasant as unavoidable
From page 6.4  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of resignation means:
acceptance of something undesired as unavoidable or the lesser of evils
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 1, p.6.4
Web Links
retort
1 use
Now Lennie retorted belligerently, "He ain't neither. George won't do nothing like that. ... He's nice to me."
retorted = replied quickly
From page 102.5  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of retort means:
a quick reply to a question or remark — especially a witty or critical one
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6, p.102.5
Web Links
revere
1 use
This thing they had never really believed in was coming true. George said reverently, "Jesus Christ! I bet we could swing her." His eyes were full of wonder.
reverently = with feelings of deep admiration and wonder
From page 60.2  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally revere means:
regard with feelings of deep respect and admiration — sometimes with a mixture of wonder and awe or fear
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 3, p.60.2
Web Links
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