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To Kill a Mockingbird

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
acquit
4 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
she was acquitted
"You think they'll acquit him that fast?" asked Jem.
acquit = officially declare "not guilty"
From page 277.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of acquit means:
to officially find "not guilty" of criminal charges; or (informally) to find someone innocent of a charge of having done wrong
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 23, p.294.2
Web Links
assume   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 10 uses
1  —9 uses as in:
I assume it's true
When Halloween came, I assumed that the whole family would be present to watch me perform, but I was disappointed.
assumed = accepted as true (without proof)
From page 339.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of assume means:
to accept something as true without proof
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library67 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 18, p.243.3
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
She assumed a false identity
Mrs. Merriweather was one of those childless adults who find it necessary to assume a different tone of voice when speaking to children.
assume = take on or adopt
From page 310.5  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of assume means:
to take on (adopt, wear, strike a pose or appearance of) — often while pretending or disguising
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library33 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 24, p.310.5
Web Links
circumstantial evidence
3 uses
We don't know, but there is circumstantial evidence to indicate that Mayella Ewell was beaten savagely by someone who led almost exclusively with his left.
circumstantial evidence = evidence that can suggest something, but does not prove it
From page 272.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 20, p.272.8
Web Links
compose   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 3 uses
1  —1 use as in:
compose a poem
Mrs. Grace Merriweather had composed an original pageant entitled Maycomb County: Ad Astra Per Aspera, and I was to be a ham.
composed = written
From page 338.6  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of compose means:
to write or create something with care — especially music or a literary work, but could be other things as diverse as a plan or a letter
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library12 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 27, p.338.6
Web Links
2  —2 uses as in:
keep your composure
Aunt Alexandra composed herself for a two-hour nap and dared us to make any noise in the yard, the neighborhood was resting.
composed = settled or calmed
From page 198.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of compose means:
to calm someone or settle something
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 15, p.198.2
Web Links
congregation
9 uses
One by one, the congregation came forward and dropped nickels and dimes into a black enameled coffee can.
congregation = people who worship together in the same building
From page 162.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 12, p.159.8
Web Links
contradict
5 uses
It has relied instead upon the testimony of two witnesses whose evidence has not only been called into serious question on cross-examination, but has been flatly contradicted by the defendant.
contradicted = disagreed with
From page 271.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally contradict means:
disagree
in various senses, including:
  • to say something is not true — as in "She contradicted his testimony."
  • to say something else is true when both can't be true — as in "I don't believe her. She contradicted herself as she told us what happened."
  • to be in conflict with — as in "Her assertions contradict accepted scientific principles."
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library13 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 4, p.49.8
Web Links
contrast   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 3 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
contrast their writing styles
...he had thought that up to make me understand he wasn't afraid of Radleys in any shape or form, to contrast his own fearless heroism with my cowardice.
contrast = point to the difference between
From page 51.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contrast means:
point to differences between; or compare to show differences
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 4, p.51.5
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
there is a contrast
As Atticus's fists went to his hips, so did Jem's, and as they faced each other I could see little resemblance between them: Jem's soft brown hair and eyes, his oval face and snug-fitting ears were our mother's, contrasting oddly with Atticus's graying black hair and square-cut features, but they were somehow alike.
contrasting = drawing attention to an unmissable difference when seen side-by-side
From page 203.8  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contrast means:
a difference — especially a notable difference; or the side-x-side arrangement of things that draws attention to an unmissable difference
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 15, p.203.8
Web Links
critical
2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
critical acclaim
Attentive critics of courthouse business, Atticus said they knew as much law as the Chief Justice, from long years of observation.
critics = people who share expert judgement
From page 217.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of critical means:
relating to thoughtful judgement of what is good and bad about something — possibly from people whose job is to share their expert opinions in a given industry
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library13 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 16, p.217.9
Web Links
unquizzed meaning  —1 use
cross-examination
6 uses
Never, never, never, on cross-examination ask a witness a question you don't already know the answer to, was a tenet I absorbed with my baby-food.
cross-examination = re-questioning a witness who has already been questionied by the other side in court
From page 237.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally cross-examination means:
the re-questioning of a witness who has already been questioned by the other side in court
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6, p.68.8
Web Links
defendant
15 uses
The defendant is not guilty, but somebody in this courtroom is.
defendant = person legally accused
From page 271.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally defendant means:
a person or institution legally accused or sued in court
Word Statistics
Book15 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 15, p.193.1
Web Links
engage
6 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
engage in conversation
Aunt Alexandra got up from the table and swiftly passed more refreshments, neatly engaging Mrs. Merriweather and Mrs. Gates in brisk conversation.
engaging = involving
From page 312.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of engage means:
to interact in various ways — such as to participate, involve, interest, or attract
The exact meaning of this sense of engage depends upon its context. For example:
  • "They engaged in debate." — participated
  • "She engaged him in conversation." — involved
  • "She is an engaging conversationalist." — interesting
  • "She has an engaging smile." — attractive (attracting interest and interaction)
  • "The proposal engages the interest of many young voters." — attracts and involves
  • "She engages with her constituents." — interacts in a meaningful way
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 24, p.312.8
Web Links
unquizzed meaning  —4 uses
Hitler
16 uses
But it's okay to hate Hitler?
Hitler = German Nazi dictator during World War II who murdered millions of Jews and others
From page 330.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of Hitler means:
German Nazi dictator during World War II; murdered millions of Jews and others who were not of the Aryan race (1889-1945)
Word Statistics
Book16 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 26, p.327.8
Web Links
indicate
5 uses
We don't know, but there is circumstantial evidence to indicate that Mayella Ewell was beaten savagely by someone who led almost exclusively with his left.
indicate = suggest (possibly show)
From page 272.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally indicate means:
to show (point out, demonstrate, express, or suggest)
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library40 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 9, p.106.5
Web Links
persecution
7 uses
Persecution comes from people who are prejudiced.
persecution = bad and unfair treatment of a group of people
From page 329.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally persecution means:
very bad and unfair treatment of others — usually because of race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, or political beliefs
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 26, p.327.9
Web Links
tenet
1 use
Never, never, never, on cross-examination ask a witness a question you don't already know the answer to, was a tenet I absorbed with my baby-food.
tenet = important belief
From page 237.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally tenet means:
an important belief that is part of a larger framework of beliefs
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 17, p.237.1
Web Links
testify
8 uses
Tate testified that her right eye was blackened, that she was beaten around the...
testified = said
From page 235.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally testify means:
provide evidence of something — especially to say something under oath in a court of law
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library13 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 16, p.220.8
Web Links
testimony
8 uses
Mr. Ewell, you heard the sheriff's testimony, didn't you?
testimony = statement (made under oath in a court trial)
From page 235.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally testimony means:
something that serves as evidence — especially a statement at a trial or hearing
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 17, p.232.9
Web Links
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