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To Kill a Mockingbird

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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accompany
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
accompany on the journey
...when Jem permitted me to accompany him (he was now positively allergic to my presence when in public), ...
accompany = travel along with
From page 180.2  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accompany means:
to travel along with
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 14, p.180.2
Web Links
acquiesce
2 uses
We were accustomed to prompt, if not always cheerful acquiescence to Atticus's instructions, but from the way he stood Jem was not thinking of budging.
acquiescence = compliance (doing what has been asked)
From page 203.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally acquiesce means:
reluctant or unenthusiastic compliance, consent, or agreement
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 15, p.203.6
Web Links
acrimony
1 use
We could tell, however, when debate became more acrimonious than professional, but this was from watching lawyers other than our father. I never heard Atticus raise his voice in my life, except to a deaf witness.
acrimonious = angry
From page 229.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally acrimony means:
anger—often accompanied by bitterness
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 17, p.229.9
Web Links
begrudge
2 uses
I don't know of any landowner around here who begrudges those children any game their father can hit.
begrudges = gives unwillingly to
From page 41.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally begrudge means:
to resent (feel bitterness—usually over unfairness); or to give unwillingly
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.41.5
Web Links
brevity
1 use
When Miss Maudie was angry her brevity was icy.
brevity = use of few words
From page 312.6  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally brevity means:
the use of just a few words; or lasting a short time
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 24, p.312.6
Web Links
compensate
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
she compensates with extra effort
The fact that Aunty was a good cook was some compensation for being forced to spend a religious holiday with Francis Hancock.
compensation = something that makes up for something else

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
From page 103.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of compensate means:
make up for; or adjust for
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 9, p.103.2
Web Links
contentious
2 uses
"Ain't got no mother," was the answer, "and their paw's right contentious."
contentious = argumentative
From page 36.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally contentious means:
causing or likely to cause disagreement; or argumentative
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.36.5
Web Links
context
1 use
...all men are created equal ... There is a tendency ... for certain people to use this phrase out of context, to satisfy all conditions. ... We know all men are not created equal in the sense some people would have us believe... But there is one way in this country in which all men are created equal— there is one human institution that makes a pauper the equal of a Rockefeller, the stupid man the equal of an Einstein, and the ignorant man the equal of any college president. That institution, gentlemen, is a court.
out of context = in a misleading manner because it is presented without the situation in which it occurred
From page 274.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally context means:
the setting or situation in which something occurs
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 20, p.274.1
Web Links
convey
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
convey her thoughts
Aunt Alexandra managed to smile in a way that conveyed a gentle apology to Cousin Lily and firm disapproval to me.
conveyed = communicated or expressed
From page 176.4  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of convey means:
communicate or express
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 13, p.176.4
Web Links
correspond
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
corresponding time period
He drew in his breath suddenly. Glancing below, I saw no corresponding reaction, and wondered if Jem was trying to be dramatic.
corresponding = fitting or matching
From page 224.6  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of correspond means:
connect or fit together by being equivalent, proportionate, or matched

(Two things are equivalent if they have the same or very similar value, purpose, or result.)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 17, p.224.6
Web Links
edify
2 uses
Still, everything he read he passed along to me, but with this difference: formerly, because he thought I'd like it; now, for my edification and instruction.
edification = education

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
From page 184.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally edify means:
to instruct — morally or intellectually
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5, p.65.9
Web Links
immaterial
3 uses
"Can't see what witness's literacy has to do with the case, irrelevant 'n' immaterial."
immaterial = unimportant
From page 236.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of immaterial means:
not important, or not relevant
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 17, p.236.5
Web Links
irrelevant
3 uses
Can't see what witness's literacy has to do with the case, irrelevant 'n' immaterial.
irrelevant = not related or significant to the subject being considered
From page 236.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally irrelevant means:
not relevant (not related to the subject being considered, or not important enough to want to consider)
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 17, p.236.5
Web Links
morbid
6 uses
1  —6 uses as in:
a morbid curiosity
Once the town was terrorized by a series of morbid nocturnal events: people's chickens and household pets were found mutilated;
morbid = suggesting the horror of death and decay
From page 10.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of morbid means:
suggesting death and decay; or an unhealthy interest in disturbing thoughts such as of death and decay
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.10.9
Web Links
remorse
3 uses
I sometimes felt a twinge of remorse, when passing by the old place, at ever having taken part in what must have been sheer torment to Arthur Radley—
remorse = regret for having done wrong
From page 324.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally remorse means:
a feeling of deep regret for doing something that was wrong
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9, p.115.9
Web Links
repertoire
2 uses
...running through our list of dramas... But by the end of August our repertoire was vapid from countless reproductions, and it was then that Dill gave us the idea of making Boo Radley come out.
repertoire = collection of things to perform (in this case dramas)
From page 10.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally repertoire means:
a collection of works (plays, songs, operas, ballets) that an artist or company is prepared to perform
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.10.1
Web Links
squalor
2 uses
Out there in J. Grimes Everett's land there's nothing but sin and squalor.
squalor = dirtiness and unpleasantness
From page 309.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally squalor means:
(describing a place) extremely dirty and unpleasant — typically due to poverty
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 24, p.309.8
Web Links
tacit
2 uses
Jem went in grinning, and Calpurnia nodded tacit consent to having Dill in to supper.
tacit = implied, but not said aloud
From page 278.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally tacit means:
implied or understood, but not expressed directly
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5, p.56.1
Web Links
vapid
1 use
But by the end of August our repertoire was vapid from countless reproductions, and it was then that Dill gave us the idea of making Boo Radley come out.
vapid = uninteresting
From page 10.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally vapid means:
dull (lacking anything interesting or stimulating)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.10.1
Web Links
yield
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
will yield valuable data
The following week the knot-hole yielded a tarnished medal.
yielded = produced
From page 81.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of yield means:
to produce (usually something wanted); or the thing or amount produced
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 7, p.81.1
Web Links
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