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Fahrenheit 451

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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accompany
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
accompany on the journey
They are never, alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts, we've shouted to ourselves.
accompanied = joined in their travels
From page 102.4  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accompany means:
to travel along with
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st usePart 2, p.102.4
Web Links
censor
2 uses
They were given the new job, as custodians of our peace of mind ... official censors, judges, and executors.
censors = people who destroy information considered politically unacceptable
From page 56.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of censor means:
to remove or suppress anything considered obscene, immoral, or politically unacceptable

or:

a person who does such suppression
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 1, p.55.4
Web Links
cite
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
cited from the President's speech
And 'The Devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.'
cite = quote

(editor's note:  Beatty is quoting Shakespeare. In this context, Scripture is a synonym for The Bible.)
From page 103.4  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of cite means:
to mention something or quote someone (to make a point)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st usePart 2, p.103.4
Web Links
compose
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
composed of many parts
Behind her the walls of the room were flooded with green and yellow and orange fireworks sizzling and bursting to some music composed almost completely of trap drums, tom-toms, and cymbals.
composed = made up
From page 56.5  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of compose means:
to create something by arranging parts; or to be those parts
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st usePart 1, p.56.5
Web Links
critical
4 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
critical acclaim
No wonder books stopped selling, the critics said.
critics = people whose job is to share expert judgement
From page 55.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of critical means:
relating to thoughtful judgement of what is good and bad about something — possibly from people whose job is to share their expert opinions in a given industry
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library12 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st usePart 1, p.55.2
Web Links
unquizzed meaning  —2 uses
desolate
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
desolated the region
Though the desolation had not yet arrived, [it] was still in the air, it was certain as man could make it.
desolation = destruction

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
From page 152.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of desolate means:
destroyed; or emptied of people; or emptied of most plants and animals
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st usePart 3, p.152
Web Links
dismay
2 uses
  ...and suddenly the odor of kerosene made him vomit.
  Mildred came in, humming. She was surprised. "Why'd you do that?"
  He looked with dismay at the floor. "We burned an old woman with her books."
dismay = sadness or distress
From page 47.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally dismay means:
to feel sadness, disappointment, or worry — typically in response to something surprising
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st usePart 1, p.47.2
Web Links
displace
3 uses
The zipper displaces the button and a man lacks just that much time to think while dressing at dawn, a philosophical hour, and thus a melancholy hour.
displaces = takes the place of
From page 53.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally displace means:
force to move; or to take the place of
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 2, p.106.2
Web Links
environment
3 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
her family environment
The home environment can undo a lot you try to do at school.
environment = surrounding conditions
From page 57.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of environment means:
surrounding conditions
in various senses, including:
  • conditions in a location or geographic area — as in "the desert environment"
  • conditions that affect a particular activity — as in "the learning environment"
  • conditions that create a certain mood — as in "a competitive environment," or "a romantic environment,"
  • conditions that impact a particular computer system, subsystem, or program — as in "the Windows environment"
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st usePart 1, p.57.7
Web Links
evaluate
1 use
Eventually, I could put out ears into all parts of the city, with various men, listening and evaluating.
evaluating = thinking carefully and making judgments
From page 87.3  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally evaluate means:
to think carefully and make a judgment about something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st usePart 2, p.87.3
Web Links
fugitive
3 uses
The fugitive cannot escape if everyone in the next minute looks from his house.
fugitive = person fleeing police
From page 132  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of fugitive means:
someone who is running away or hiding to avoid arrest or an unpleasant situation
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3, p.117.9
Web Links
function
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
can't function well without sleep
It [the mechanical hound] doesn't like or dislike. It just 'functions'.
functions = works or operates
From page 24.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of function means:
work or operate — sometimes to work or operate normally or in a particular way
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library12 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st usePart 1, p.24.1
Web Links
melancholy
5 uses
The zipper displaces the button and a man lacks just that much time to think while dressing at dawn, a philosophical hour, and thus a melancholy hour....
melancholy = thoughtfully sad
From page 53.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally melancholy means:
a sad feeling or manner — sometimes thoughtfully sad
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 1, p.13.8
Web Links
mortal
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
mortal body
The books are to remind us what asses and fools we are. They're Caesar's praetorian guard, whispering as the parade roars down the avenue, 'Remember, Caesar, thou art mortal.'
mortal = human (especially merely human)

(editor's note:  Faber is referring to a custom that in a victory parade, a Roman general or emperor had someone in the back of their chariot to whisper a reminder that they are only human.)
From page 82.5  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of mortal means:
human (especially merely human); or subject to death
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 2, p.82.5
Web Links
oblivion
2 uses
And if he kept his eye peeled quickly he would see himself, an instant before oblivion,
oblivion = no longer existing
From page 128.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally oblivion means:
the state of being completely forgotten

or:

the state of being completely destroyed — typically so as to no longer exist

or:

a state of having lost all sense of what is going on — as during sleep or use of some drugs
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3, p.128.5
Web Links
perish
2 uses
[of the legend of Hercules and Antaeus] But when he was held, rootless, in midair, by Hercules, he perished easily. If there isn't something in that legend for us today, in this city, in our time, then I am completely insane.
perished = died
From page 79.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally perish means:
to die — especially in an unnatural way

or:

to be destroyed or cease to exist
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st usePart 2, p.79.9
Web Links
recite
2 uses
And when the war's over, some day, some year, the books can be written again, the people will be called in, one by one, to recite what they know and we'll set it up in type until another Dark Age, when we might have to do the whole damn thing over again.
recite = say aloud (from memory)
From page 146.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally recite means:
to say or read something aloud — especially something previously memorized such as a poem

or:

to say in detail — especially a list of things
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library19 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3, p.146.9
Web Links
simultaneous
2 uses
The camera fell upon the victim, even as did the Hound. Both reached him simultaneously.
simultaneously = at the same time

(editor's note:  This is when the police "save face" by killing an innocent man because they can't find Montag.)
From page 142.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library12 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st usePart 2, p.90.2
Web Links
trace   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 3 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
trace the origin or development
He found the audio-capsule, he heard your voice, he was going to trace it.
trace = find out where it came from
From page 124.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of trace means:
to find, search, research, or keep track of
This sense of trace usually has to do with information. It's specific meaning depends on its context. For example:
to find or search for something through investigation — often the origin of something:
  • "The police traced the call." — found out where it originated
  • "We are tracing the lost luggage" — searching for
  • "Can you trace the problem to its source?" — find through investigation
  • "She traced her family history to discover that her great-grandmother came to the United States from Lithuania when the Nazis occupied it." — discovered something through investigation
to research or report on the development of something
  • "She traced the history of the automobile in her paper." — researched the development of something
  • "Her presentation traced recent progress in alternative energy solutions." — reported on
to monitor or keep track of the progress or development of something
  • "She traces the progress of at-risk students." — monitors information
  • "I used binoculars to trace her progress up the mountain." — monitor, follow, or track
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st usePart 3, p.112.9
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
trace a picture or outline
Her fingers were tracing the book's outline and as the shape became familiar her face looked surprised and then stunned.
tracing = following along (drawing)
From page 53.7  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of trace means:
copy the lines of an image; or draw an outline; or carefully draw a specific pattern
This sense of trace has to do with drawing, but it's specific meaning depends on its context. For example:
copying the outline of an image
  • "She used tracing paper to make a copy." — paper you can see through, so that when it is placed on a picture, you can use a pencil to follow the lines of the image being copied
  • "She projected the image onto the wall, hung a sheet of paper there, and traced the projected image onto the paper." — followed the lines with her pencil
draw an outline or a specific pattern
  • "She used her toe to trace half the fish symbol in the sand." — draw a simple outline
  • "The child used a stick to trace circles and swirls in the mud." — draw
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library13 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 1, p.53.7
Web Links
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