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Fahrenheit 451

Extra Credit Words with Typical Sample Sentences

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aesthetic
1 use
It was not aesthetically pleasing.
aesthetically = related to beauty or good taste
DefinitionGenerally aesthetic means:
related to beauty or good taste — often referring to one's appreciation of beauty or one's sense of what is beautiful

or:

beautiful or tasteful
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st usePart 3, p.109.6
Web Links
combustion
1 use
Increasing carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is produced by combustion of fossil fuels, coal, and natural gas.
combustion = burning
DefinitionGenerally combustion means:
the act of burning

or metaphorically:

a state of violent disturbance and excitement
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 1, p.58.4
Web Links
complement
1 use
The coach is not looking for the best players. She's looking for players who will best complement each other.
complement = make better
DefinitionGenerally complement means:
add to something to make it better or complete

or more rarely:

a quantity of something that is considered complete
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st usePart 2, p.86.7
Web Links
incriminate
1 use
She refused to answer on the grounds that she might incriminate herself.
incriminate = make herself look guilty
DefinitionGenerally incriminate means:
to make someone appear guilty
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3, p.145.9
Web Links
insidious
1 use
The debt grew insidiously—just a little at a time and always for a good purpose.
Alan Greenspan  --  The Age of Turbulence
insidiously = in a manner not appearing dangerous, but actually very harmful over time
DefinitionGenerally insidious means:
not appearing dangerous, but actually very harmful over time

or:

treacherous  (dangerous due to trickery or from hidden or unpredictable risks)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 2, p.82.8
Web Links
liberal arts
1 use
It is a prestigious liberal arts school.
liberal arts = focusing on studies intended to provide general knowledge and intellectual skills
DefinitionGenerally liberal arts means:
studies intended to provide general knowledge and intellectual skills (rather than occupational or professional skills)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 2, p.71
Web Links
metaphor
1 use
He was speaking metaphorically when he referred to being mugged by reality.
metaphorically = with a figure of speech in which a similarity between two things is highlighted by using a word to refer to something that it does not literally denote
DefinitionGenerally metaphor means:
a figure of speech in which a similarity between two things is highlighted by using a word to refer to something that it does not literally denote — as when Shakespeare wrote, "All the world's a stage."

For example, Shakespeare wrote, "All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players." Shakespeare is not saying the world is really a stage and all people are actors, but there are similarities he wants us to recognize.
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 2, p.103.7
Web Links
patronage
1 use
Most ambassadors are selected from career Foreign Service officers, but many are appointed through political patronage.
patronage = political appointment in return for political support
DefinitionGenerally patronage means:
support or favor given
The exact sense of patronage depends upon its context. For example::
  • "wants to increase federal patronage of the arts" — donations made to support an organization or person
  • "a political patronage appointee" — favors given such as political appointments or contracts given in return for political support
  • "rewards repeat patronage" — business from customers — especially recurring business
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 2, p.71
Web Links
pedantic
1 use
Her lectures were too pedantic for my taste.
pedantic = overly concerned with book learning
DefinitionGenerally pedantic means:
too concerned with formal rules, details, or book learning
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3, p.146.6
Web Links
perfunctory
1 use
She gave us menus and a perfunctory smile.
perfunctory = done without much interest or effort
DefinitionGenerally perfunctory means:
done without much interest or effort — especially as when dispensing with a formality
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 2, p.105.2
Web Links
pyre
2 uses
While cremation is not uncommon in the western world, open air funeral pyres are typically illegal.
pyres = piles of wood or other burnable materials
DefinitionGenerally pyre means:
a pile of wood or other burnable material — especially to burn a dead body as in a funeral rite
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3, p.156.7
Web Links
rationalize
1 use
Criminals typically rationalize their behavior. Even when convicted, many blame others for their decisions.
rationalize = think of a good excuse for
DefinitionGenerally this sense of rationalize means:
to think of a good excuse for behavior that seems bad or unreasonable, and to believe the excuse is good or reasonable — typically done subconsciously and often after the behavior in question
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 1, p.60.7
Web Links
rebuttal
1 use
She immediately wrote a rebuttal and sent it to the New York Times.
rebuttal = argument against (something)
DefinitionGenerally rebuttal means:
a statement arguing against something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 2, p.104.2
Web Links
resolve
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
Her resolve weakened.
She never waivered in her resolve to attend a good college.
resolve = determination (firmness of purpose)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of resolve means:
firmness of purpose (strong determination to do something)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st usePart 3, p.147.9
Web Links
scapegoat
1 use
She is a convenient scapegoat because she was chosen by the last administration.
scapegoat = someone to blame for the errors of others

(editor's note:  This expression comes from an ancient Jewish ritual in which the sins of the people were ritually transferred to a goat which was then driven into the desert away from the community.)
DefinitionGenerally scapegoat means:
someone blamed or punished for the errors of others
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3, p.141.6
Web Links
sloth
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
a sloth in the tree
A sloth moves faster than she does.
sloth = a type of animal that seldom moves and is very slow when it does move
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3, p.150.9
Web Links
sober
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
I need to sober up.
Coffee doesn't really help one to sober up; though it does help fight sleepiness.
sober up = become less drunk
DefinitionGenerally this sense of sober up means:
to become less drunk
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 2, p.102.7
Web Links
status quo
1 use
Despite the rhetoric, the new agreement largely maintains the status quo.
status quo = existing state of affairs
DefinitionGenerally this sense of status quo means:
the existing state of affairs
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3, p.150.8
Web Links
subside
3 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
her anger subsided
I couldn't think clearly until the pain subsided.
subsided = became less severe
DefinitionGenerally this sense of subside means:
become less intense, less severe, or less active — perhaps going away entirely
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 2, p.78.4
Web Links
torrent
2 uses
She screamed a torrent of abuse.
torrent = an overwhelming amount
DefinitionGenerally torrent means:
an overwhelming amount — especially of quickly moving water
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 1, p.59.2
Web Links
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