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Brave New World

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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abject
8 uses
A look from Mustapha Mond reduced him to an abject silence.
abject = extremely submissive
From page 218.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally abject means:
extreme (in a negative sense such as misery, hopelessness, submissiveness, cruelty, or cowardice)
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 16, p.226.6
Web Links
appalling
8 uses
Deprivation of soma–appalling thought!
appalling = horrible
From page 210.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally appalling means:
shockingly terrible or horrible
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.39.2
Web Links
atone
6 uses
"A good beginning for a Solidarity Service," thought Bernard miserably, and foresaw for himself yet another failure to achieve atonement.
atonement = making up for wrongs
From page 79.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally atone means:
to fix or make up for a wrong — especially a sin (even if nothing can be done to make up for the wrong other than to show regret)
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5, p.79.9
Web Links
audible
6 uses
  "She's my mother," he said in a scarcely audible voice.
  The nurse glanced at him with startled, horrified eyes; then quickly looked away.
audible = capable of being heard
From page 199.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7, p.108.7
Web Links
cease
9 uses
He was obscurely terrified lest she should cease to be something he could feel himself unworthy of.
cease = discontinue
From page 169.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally cease means:
to stop or discontinue
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library26 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2, p.21.6
Web Links
contempt
8 uses
1  —8 uses as in:
feels contempt towards her
The mockery made him [Bernard] feel an outsider; and feeling an outsider he behaved like one, which increased the prejudice against him and intensified the contempt and hostility aroused by his physical defects.
contempt = disrespect and dislike for being inferior
From page 65.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contempt means:
lack of respect for someone or something thought inferior — often accompanied by a feeling of dislike or disgust
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 13, p.187.9
Web Links
content
4 uses
And being contented has none of the glamour of a good fight against misfortune, none of the picturesqueness of a struggle with temptation, or a fatal overthrow by passion or doubt.
contented = satisfied and unworried
From page 221.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of content means:
satisfied
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library54 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.42.8
Web Links
grave
9 uses
He looked at her in silence, his face unresponsive and very grave–looked at her intently.
grave = serious
From page 92.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of grave means:
serious and/or solemn
The exact meaning of this sense of grave can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "This is a grave problem," or "a situation of the utmost gravity." — important, dangerous, or causing worry
  • "She was in a grave mood upon returning from the funeral." — sad or solemn
  • "She looked me in the eye and gravely promised." — in a sincere and serious manner
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2, p.24.3
Web Links
indefatigable
7 uses
...the dancers continued for a while to circulate, to beat and beat out the indefatigable rhythm.
indefatigable = energetic without sign of tiring
From page 85.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2, p.28.8
Web Links
orthodox
8 uses
Unorthodoxy threatens more than the life of a mere individual; it strikes at Society itself.
unorthodoxy = non-normal beliefs and behavior

(editor's note:  The prefix "un-" in unorthodoxy means not and reverses the meaning of orthodoxy. This is the same pattern you see in words like unhappy, unknown, and unlucky.)
From page 148.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally orthodox means:
normal (describing thinking or behavior as commonly or traditionally accepted)
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10, p.148.2
Web Links
Othello
14 uses
From its hiding-place he took out his mouse-nibbled volume, turned with religious care its stained and crumbled pages, and began to read Othello.
Othello = Shakespeare's tragedy of betrayal and jealousy
From page 171.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally Othello means:
Shakespeare's tragedy of betrayal and jealousy (c. 1604)
Word Statistics
Book14 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 11, p.171.6
Web Links
preserve
6 uses
1  —6 uses as in:
preserve the records
No pains have been spared to make your lives emotionally easy–to preserve you, so far as that is possible, from having emotions at all.
preserve = protect or keep
From page 44.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of preserve means:
to protect something or to keep it as it is
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1, p.5.6
Web Links
propaganda
10 uses
Why was that old fellow such a marvellous propaganda technician?
propaganda = information intended to influence opinions
From page 185.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally propaganda means:
one-sided information that is purposefully spread to influence opinions — often misleading information of a political nature
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.51.1
Web Links
reproach
8 uses
Straight from the depths of a non-existent heart, "My friends, my friends!" said the Voice so pathetically, with a note of such infinitely tender reproach that, behind their gas masks, even the policemen's eyes were momentarily dimmed with tears, "what is the meaning of this?"
reproach = disappointment in someone for doing something wrong
From page 215.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally reproach means:
a criticism; or to express criticism — especially where a relationship makes the disapproval result in disappointment or shame
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 13, p.192.6
Web Links
senile
5 uses
"But I'm very glad," Dr. Shaw had concluded, "to have had this opportunity to see an example of senility in a human being."
senility = mental weakness caused by old age
From page 155.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally senile means:
mental weakness caused by old age; or describing a medical condition as caused by old age
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 11, p.155.9
Web Links
simultaneous
10 uses
In the four thousand rooms of the Centre the four thousand electric clocks simultaneously struck four.
simultaneously = at the same time
From page 33.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 1, p.12.9
Web Links
solidarity
13 uses
It reminded her reassuringly of the synthetic noises made at Solidarity Services and Ford's Day celebrations.
solidarity = to reinforce a group's shared values and support for each other
From page 113.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally solidarity means:
a state of agreement and support — especially for political action
Word Statistics
Book13 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 3, p.52.9
Web Links
tremulous
6 uses
He had managed, with a heroic effort, to hold down the mounting pressure of his hilarity; but "sweet mother" (in the Savage's tremulous tone of anguish) and the reference to Tybalt lying dead, but evidently uncremated and wasting his phosphorus on a dim monument, were too much for him.
tremulous = quivering (shaky)
From page 185.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally tremulous means:
quivering (shaky) — usually from weakness or fear — especially of the voice
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.7.7
Web Links
utter   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 9 uses
1  —6 uses as in:
utter stupidity
He was utterly miserable, and perhaps (her shining eyes accused him), perhaps it was his own fault.
utterly = completely
From page 86.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of utter means:
complete or total (used as an intensifier—typically when stressing how bad something is)
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library26 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 3, p.40.6
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
utter a complaint
Five words he uttered and no more-five words, the same as those he had said to Bernard about the Arch-Community-Songster of Canterbury.
uttered = said aloud

(editor's note:  This was followed by five words in Zuni which Huxley didn't intend for the reader to understand. This editor was unable to find a reliable translation by looking on the Internet, but the words are clearly intended to be insulting.)
From page 250.3  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of utter means:
say with the voice
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 18, p.250.3
Web Links
unquizzed meaning  —2 uses
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