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Brave New World
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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benevolent
4 uses
Eyes shone, cheeks were flushed, the inner light of universal benevolence broke out on every face in happy, friendly smiles.
benevolence = kindness or generosity
DefinitionGenerally benevolent means:
kind, generous, or charitable
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
decorum
2 uses
If ever I hear again of any lapse from a proper standard of infantile decorum, I shall ask for your transference to a Sub-Centre–preferably to Iceland.
decorum = manners and conduct considered to be proper and in good taste
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
deference
2 uses
"Charming, charming," murmured the Director and, giving her two or three little pats, received in exchange a rather deferential smile for himself.
deferential = politely respectful
DefinitionGenerally deference means:
polite respect — often when submitting to another's wishes
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
deride
8 uses
The singing words mocked him derisively.
derisively = with treatment as though he was inferior and unworthy of respect
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
laugh at or make fun of—while showing a lack of respect
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
elated
5 uses
The Director's threats had actually elated him, made him feel larger than life.
elated = made to feel happy and excited
DefinitionGenerally elated means:
full of happiness and excitement
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
furtive
2 uses
With eyes for the most part downcast and, if ever they lighted on a fellow creature, at once and furtively averted, Bernard hastened across the roof.
furtively = taking pains to avoid being noticed
DefinitionGenerally furtive means:
taking pains to avoid being observed

or:

in a manner indicating nervousness (being cautious or appearing suspicious)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
gesticulate
2 uses
He jumped up, ran across the room, and stood gesticulating in front of the Controller.
gesticulating = making gestures (hand or body movements) while speaking or to express something
DefinitionGenerally gesticulate means:
to make gestures (hand or body movements) while speaking or to express something
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 16
Web Links
gratuitous
1 use
Primroses and landscapes, he pointed out, have one grave defect: they are gratuitous.
gratuitous = unnecessary
DefinitionGenerally gratuitous means:
unnecessary and unwarranted

or less commonly (except where it is common in the legal field):  costing nothing
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
heresy
3 uses
...this insignificant fellow with the unsavoury reputation and the heretical opinions.
heretical = characterized by opinions or actions most people consider immoral
DefinitionGenerally heresy means:
opinions or actions most people consider immoral
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
impudent
8 uses
Impudent strumpet!
impudent = improperly bold or disrespectful

(editor's note:  Strumpet, is seldom used these days, but it refers to a woman who is a prostitute or is especially promiscuous.)
DefinitionGenerally impudent means:
improperly bold or disrespectful — especially toward someone who is older or considered to be of higher status
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 13
Web Links
indecision
2 uses
He remembered those weeks of timid indecision, during which he had looked and longed and despaired of ever having the courage to ask her.
indecision = leaving a decision unmade due to uncertainty
DefinitionGenerally indecision means:
leaving a decision unmade due to uncertainty; or a general tendency to leave decisions unmade
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
mollify
1 use
he had mollified the Savage into listening to his explanations,
mollified = calmed (from anger or distress)
DefinitionGenerally mollify means:
calm someone who is or may become angry or upset
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
novel
1 use
He sat for some time, meditatively frowning, then picked up his pen and wrote across the title-page: "The author's mathematical treatment of the conception of purpose is novel and highly ingenious, but heretical and, so far as the present social order is concerned, dangerous and potentially subversive."
novel = new and original
DefinitionGenerally this sense of novel means:
new and original — typically something considered good
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
obscure   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 3 uses
1  —1 use as in:
it obscured my view
...as the passions grow calm, as the fancy and sensibilities are less excited and less excitable, our reason becomes less troubled in its working, less obscured by the images, desires and distractions, in which it used to be absorbed;
obscured = made less visible or understandable
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
to block from view or make less visible or understandable
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 17
Web Links
2  —2 uses as in:
the view or directions are obscure
But Bernard would not be cheered; without answering, without even looking at Helmholtz, he went and sat down on the most uncomfortable chair in the room, carefully chosen in the obscure hope of somehow deprecating the wrath of the higher powers.
obscure = little understood
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
not clearly seen, understood, or expressed
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
obstinate
3 uses
"All the same," he insisted obstinately, "Othello's good, Othello's better than those feelies."
obstinately = stubbornly
DefinitionGenerally obstinate means:
stubbornly not doing what others want
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
orthodox
8 uses
Unorthodoxy threatens more than the life of a mere individual; it strikes at Society itself.
unorthodoxy = beliefs that don't adhere to what is commonly accepted
DefinitionGenerally orthodox means:
thinking and behavior that is (or was) commonly accepted
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
prodigious
3 uses
By which time the original egg was in a fair way to becoming anything from eight to ninety-six embryos– a prodigious improvement, you will agree, on nature.
prodigious = enormous; or far beyond what is usual in magnitude or degree
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
stoic
2 uses
Of that imagined stoicism, that theoretical courage, not a trace was left.
stoicism = to be unaffected by pleasure, pain, or emotions
DefinitionGenerally stoic means:
seeming unaffected by pleasure, pain, or emotions
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
wanton
2 uses
As flies to wanton boys are we to the gods; they kill us for their sport.
wanton = of something considered bad:  excessive, thoughtless indulgence — such as cruelty or violence
DefinitionGenerally wanton means:
of something considered bad:  excessive, thoughtless indulgence — such as waste, cruelty, violence, and (especially in the past) sexual promiscuity
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 15
Web Links
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