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Animal Farm

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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advocate
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
to advocate
When the animals had assembled in the big barn, Snowball stood up and, though occasionally interrupted by bleating from the sheep, set forth his reasons for advocating the building of the windmill.
advocating = recommending
From page 52.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of advocate means:
to recommend or publicly support someone or something
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 5, p.52.1
Web Links
assume   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 4 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
I assume it's true
The animals had assumed as a matter of course that these would be shared out equally; one day, however, the order went forth that all the windfalls were to be collected and brought to the harness-room for the use of the pigs.
assumed = accepted as true (without really knowing for sure)
From page 35.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of assume means:
to accept something as true without proof
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library18 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 3, p.35.5
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
She assumed power
With their superior knowledge it was natural that they should assume the leadership.
assume = take on (as a responsibility)
From page 27.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of assume means:
beginning to take power or responsibility
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library18 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 3, p.27.9
Web Links
compose
4 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
compose a poem
In its place Minimus, the poet, had composed another song which began: Animal Farm, Animal Farm, Never through me shalt thou come to harm!
composed = written
From page 88.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of compose means:
to write or create something with care — especially music or a literary work, but could be other things as diverse as a plan or a letter
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 5, p.57
Web Links
contrary   (3 meanings)
3 meanings, 6 uses
1  —1 use as in:
a contrary idea
Napoleon was well aware of the bad results that might follow if the real facts of the food situation were known, and he decided to make use of Mr. Whymper to spread a contrary impression.
contrary = different
From page 75.2  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contrary means:
different (perhaps opposite or mutually exclusive)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 7, p.75.2
Web Links
2  —3 uses as in:
contrary to
A too rigid equality in rations, Squealer explained, would have been contrary to the principles of Animalism.
contrary to = in opposition to
From page 112.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2, p.17.2
Web Links
3  —2 uses as in:
on the contrary
Do not imagine, comrades, that leadership is a pleasure! On the contrary, it is a deep and heavy responsibility.
on the contrary = an expression used to strengthen denial of an idea
From page 55.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of on the contrary means:
an expression used to intensify denial of an idea
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5, p.55.4
Web Links
critical
5 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
a critical problem
At any rate, they remembered that at the critical moment of the battle Snowball had turned to flee.
critical = important
From page 81.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of critical means:
important, serious, or dangerous
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 6, p.60.8
Web Links
unquizzed meaning  —2 uses
demonstrate   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 3 uses
1  —1 use as in:
It demonstrates my point.
There was nothing with which they could compare their present lives: they had nothing to go upon except Squealer's lists of figures, which invariably demonstrated that everything was getting better and better.
demonstrated = showed
From page 130.7  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of demonstrate means:
to show
The exact meaning of this sense of demonstrate can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "I will demonstrate how to throw a Frisbee." — show how to do something
  • "I will demonstrate how much quicker the new computer is than the old one." — show how something works
  • "Her questioned demonstrated that she was listening and thinking deeply about what was said." — showed to be true or proved
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library20 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 10, p.130.7
Web Links
2  —2 uses as in:
demonstrate to protest
Napoleon had commanded that once a week there should be held something called a Spontaneous Demonstration, the object of which was to celebrate the struggles and triumphs of Animal Farm.
demonstration = public display of support

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
From page 115.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of demonstrate means:
a public display supporting a cause — usually joining with others in a political protest
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 9, p.115.7
Web Links
determine   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 4 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
determine the truth
Sometimes the older ones among them racked their dim memories and tried to determine whether in the early days of the Rebellion, when Jones's expulsion was still recent, things had been better or worse than now.
determine = figure out
From page 130.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of determine means:
to learn, discover, or officially decide
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library24 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 9, p.118.1
Web Links
2  —2 uses as in:
is determined to succeed
It was fully realized that though the human beings had been defeated in the Battle of the Cowshed they might make another and more determined attempt to recapture the farm and reinstate Mr. Jones.
determined = firm in purpose
From page 51.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library17 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5, p.51.2
expulsion
10 uses
Jones was expelled, and the Manor Farm was theirs.
expelled = forced to leave
From page 20.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally expulsion means:
the act of forcing out
especially in 2 primary senses:
  • kicking someone out of an organization — such as a school or country
  • squeezing something to eliminate a liquid or gas
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5, p.54.5
Web Links
ignominious
2 uses
And so within five minutes of their invasion they were in ignominious retreat by the same way as they had come, with a flock of geese hissing after them and pecking at their calves all the way.
ignominious = disgraceful or shameful
From page 42.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally ignominious means:
deserving or bringing disgrace or shame — typically in reference to behavior or character
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 4, p.42.8
Web Links
nevertheless
7 uses
He was deceived, and continued to report to the outside world that there was no food shortage on Animal Farm. Nevertheless, towards the end of January it became obvious that it would be necessary to procure some more grain from somewhere.
nevertheless = in spite of what was just said
From page 75.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally nevertheless means:
in spite of that (Used to connect contrasting ideas. Other synonyms could include words and phrases such as nonetheless, all the same, still,  and however.)
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 1, p.5.6
Web Links
perspective
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
Keep it in perspective
And Squealer, who happened to be passing at this moment, attended by two or three dogs, was able to put the whole matter in its proper perspective.
perspective = a sensible view of a situation
From page 67.4  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of perspective means:
a sensible view of a situation that considers its different parts in a balanced way
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 6, p.67.4
Web Links
ration
15 uses
Once again all rations were reduced, except those of the pigs and the dogs.
rations = portions of food
From page 112.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally ration means:
verb:  to restrict the amount of something each person can have — such as food or gasoline when there is a shortage, or when more is wanted than is available

or:

noun:  a fixed portion of something that is given as a person's share — such as goods of which there is a shortage, or food for soldiers in the field
Word Statistics
Book15 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.8.8
Web Links
resolution   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 10 uses
1  —9 uses as in:
a United Nations resolution
A unanimous resolution was passed on the spot that the farmhouse should be preserved as a museum.
resolution = a formal statement of a decision voted on by a group
From page 23.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of resolution means:
a formal statement of decision or opinion voted on by a group
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 3, p.31.3
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
Her resolution weakened.
And remember, comrades, your resolution must never falter. No argument must lead you astray.
resolution = determination
From page 10  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of resolution means:
determination (firmness of purpose)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 1, p.10
Web Links
trace
7 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
trace the origin or development
It was pure imagination, probably traceable in the beginning to lies circulated by Snowball.
traceable = able to be followed (to a source)

(Editor's note:  The suffix "-able" means able to be. This is the same pattern you see in words like breakable, understandable, and comfortable.)
From page 64.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of trace means:
to find, search, research, or keep track of
This sense of trace usually has to do with information. It's specific meaning depends on its context. For example:
to find or search for something through investigation — often the origin of something:
  • "The police traced the call." — found out where it originated
  • "We are tracing the lost luggage" — searching for
  • "Can you trace the problem to its source?" — find through investigation
  • "She traced her family history to discover that her great-grandmother came to the United States from Lithuania when the Nazis occupied it." — discovered something through investigation
to research or report on the development of something
  • "She traced the history of the automobile in her paper." — researched the development of something
  • "Her presentation traced recent progress in alternative energy solutions." — reported on
to monitor or keep track of the progress or development of something
  • "She traces the progress of at-risk students." — monitors information
  • "I used binoculars to trace her progress up the mountain." — monitor, follow, or track
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 6, p.64.6
Web Links
unquizzed meaning  —5 uses
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