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Animal Farm

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
accord
9 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
done of her own accord
With one accord, though nothing of the kind had been planned beforehand, they flung themselves upon their tormentors.
one accord = one mind

(editor's note:  This is like saying they had one mind. Nobody told anyone else what to do, yet they all did the same thing at the same time.)
From page 19.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accord means:
mind
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2, p.19.7
Web Links
unquizzed meaning  —5 uses
apathy
1 use
At the beginning they met with much stupidity and apathy.
apathy = lack of interest and enthusiasm
From page 16.8  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2, p.16.8
Web Links
attribute
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
I attribute it to...
Whenever anything went wrong it became usual to attribute it to Snowball.
attribute = credit (point to as the cause of) (in this case, to blame)
From page 78.2  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of attribute means:
to credit (a source for something)
in two typical senses:
  • "I attribute it to her work." — to say who or what made something happen
  • "Remember to attribute any quotations in your paper." — indicate the source of a quotation or idea
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 7, p.78.2
Web Links
blithe
1 use
One day, as Mollie strolled blithely into the yard, flirting her long tail and chewing at a stalk of hay, Clover took her aside.
blithely = in a carefree and happy manner
From page 45.7  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally blithe means:
carefree and happy — often unaware of or ignoring something that should be of concern
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5, p.45.7
Web Links
capitulate
1 use
For five days the hens held out, then they capitulated and went back to their nesting boxes.
capitulated = gave up
From page 76.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally capitulate means:
to stop resisting something — such as surrendering to someone else's decision or accepting a military defeat
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7, p.76.9
Web Links
censure
1 use
So far from being decorated, he had been censured for showing cowardice in the battle.
censured = formally criticized
From page 97.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally censure means:
harsh criticism; or formal criticism from an organization — such as the U.S. Senate
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 8, p.97.9
Web Links
complicity
1 use
On the same day it was given out that fresh documents had been discovered which revealed further details about Snowball's complicity with Jones.
complicity = guilt as an accomplice
From page 117.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally complicity means:
guilt as a helper in a crime or offense
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9, p.117.1
Web Links
contemptible
2 uses
They could not understand, they said, how even animals could bring themselves to sing such contemptible rubbish.
contemptible = very bad (deserving no respect)
From page 39.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4, p.39.9
Web Links
enmity
1 use
...remember always your duty of enmity towards Man and all his ways.
enmity = hatred
From page 11.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally enmity means:
hatred toward someone or between people — typically long-lasting
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.11.1
Web Links
ensconced
1 use
At one end of the big barn, on a sort of raised platform, Major was already ensconced on his bed of straw, under a lantern which hung from a beam.
ensconced = settled comfortably
From page 4.3  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally ensconced means:
fixed firmly; or settled comfortably
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.4.3
Web Links
expound
1 use
Several nights a week, after Mr. Jones was asleep, they held secret meetings in the barn and expounded the principles of Animalism to the others.
expounded = explained in detail
From page 16.7  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally expound means:
explain or discuss in detail
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2, p.16.7
Web Links
frugal
1 use
The truest happiness, he said, lay in working hard and living frugally.
frugally = without waste or luxury
From page 129.5  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally frugal means:
avoiding waste — typically being careful not to spend much money
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10, p.129.5
Web Links
incumbent
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
incumbent upon her to
But before doing so, there were a few words that he felt it incumbent upon him to say.
incumbent = required
From page 136.8  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of incumbent means:
necessary (for someone) as a duty or responsibility
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10, p.136.8
Web Links
indignant
2 uses
There was a cry of indignation, and everyone began thinking out ways of catching Snowball if he should ever come back.
indignation = anger at something that is unjust

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
From page 70.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally indignant means:
angered or annoyed at something unjust or wrong
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library17 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 9, p.124.9
Web Links
intermediary
1 use
A Mr. Whymper, a solicitor living in Willingdon, had agreed to act as intermediary between Animal Farm and the outside world, and would visit the farm every Monday morning to receive his instructions.
intermediary = someone who acts as a link between two others who do not meet with each other directly
From page 64.2  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally intermediary means:
someone who acts as a link between two others who don't talk directly — such as a realtor between a buyer and seller, or a friend between two people so angry they will not speak with each other
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6, p.64.2
Web Links
literate
1 use
By the autumn almost every animal on the farm was literate in some degree.
literate = able to read and write
From page 32.8  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.32.8
Web Links
maxim
6 uses
After much thought Snowball declared that the Seven Commandments could in effect be reduced to a single maxim, namely: 'Four legs good, two legs bad.'
maxim = a short saying that expresses a general truth or principle
From page 34  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9, p.125.9
Web Links
morose
1 use
Only old Benjamin was much the same as ever, except for being a little grayer about the muzzle, and, since Boxer's death, more morose and taciturn than ever.
morose = very unhappy
From page 128.2  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally morose means:
unhappy — often with a withdrawn personality
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10, p.128.2
Web Links
taciturn
1 use
Only old Benjamin was much the same as ever, except for being a little grayer about the muzzle, and, since Boxer's death, more morose and taciturn than ever.
taciturn = quiet
From page 128.2  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally taciturn means:
with a tendency to be reserved and not to talk
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10, p.128.2
Web Links
vivacious
1 use
Snowball was a more vivacious pig than Napoleon, quicker in speech and more inventive, but was not considered to have the same depth of character.
vivacious = lively and engaging
From page 16.2  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally vivacious means:
having an engaging liveliness — when said of a person, typically said of a female
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2, p.16.2
Web Links
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