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1984 by Orwell

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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approach   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 12 uses
1  —1 use as in:
use the best approach
But in matters of vital importance — meaning, in effect, war and police espionage — the empirical approach is still encouraged, or at least tolerated.
approach = technique (way of doing something)
From page 193.6  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of approach means:
a way of doing something; or a route that leads to a particular place
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2.9 (17), p.193.6
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
approached her with the proposal
A week had gone by since she had first approached him.
approached = begun communication on a delicate topic
From page 112.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of approach means:
to begin communication with someone about something — often a proposal or a delicate topic
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.1 (9), p.112.9
Web Links
unquizzed meaning  —10 uses
compose   (3 meanings)
3 meanings, 6 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
compose a poem
The words of these songs were composed without any human intervention whatever on an instrument known as a versificator.
composed = written
From page 138.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of compose means:
to write or create something with care — especially music or a literary work, but could be other things as diverse as a plan or a letter
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library12 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 2.3 (11), p.130.2
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
composed of many parts
It aroused in Winston dim memories of something seen long ago on a wall or a hoarding — a vast bottle composed of electric lights which seemed to move up and down and pour its contents into a glass.
composed = made
From page 170.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of compose means:
to create something by arranging parts; or to be those parts
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 2.8 (16), p.170.9
Web Links
3  —1 use as in:
keep your composure
He lay back on the bed and tried to compose himself.
compose = calm
From page 280.4  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of compose means:
to calm someone or settle something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 3.4 (22), p.280.4
Web Links
conscious   (3 meanings)
3 meanings, 63 uses
1  —7 uses as in:
a conscious effort to lose weight
The proles had stayed human. They had not become hardened inside. They had held on to the primitive emotions which he himself had to re-learn by conscious effort.
conscious = intentional (done on purpose with effort)

(editor's note:  The prefix "un-" in unconscious means not and reverses the meaning of conscious. This is the same pattern you see in words like unhappy, unknown, and unlucky.)
From page 165.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of conscious means:
intentional (done on purpose) — perhaps with significant effort
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.3, p.35.5
Web Links
2  —19 uses as in:
environmentally conscious
— for it is an abiding characteristic of the Low that they are too much crushed by drudgery to be more than intermittently conscious of anything outside their daily lives —
conscious = aware
From page 201.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of conscious means:
aware or concerned about something
Word Statistics
Book19 uses
Library24 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.2, p.23.5
Web Links
3  —34 uses as in:
the conscious mind
It needed also a sort of athleticism of mind, an ability at one moment to make the most delicate use of logic and at the next to be unconscious of the crudest logical errors.
unconscious = mentally unaware

(editor's note:  The prefix "un-" in unconscious means not and reverses the meaning of conscious. This is the same pattern you see in words like unhappy, unknown, and unlucky. Also note that while many people use this as a synonym for subconscious, experts in the mind may distinguish a difference.)
From page 279.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of conscious means:
mental activity of which one is self-aware
Word Statistics
Book34 uses
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.3, p.35.6
Web Links
unquizzed meaning  —3 uses
demonstrate   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 11 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
It demonstrates my point.
The belief that nothing exists outside your own mind — surely there must be some way of demonstrating that it was false?
demonstrating = showing
From page 266.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of demonstrate means:
to show
The exact meaning of this sense of demonstrate can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "I will demonstrate how to throw a Frisbee." — show how to do something
  • "I will demonstrate how much quicker the new computer is than the old one." — show how something works
  • "Her questioned demonstrated that she was listening and thinking deeply about what was said." — showed to be true or proved
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library22 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 3.1 (19), p.235.5
Web Links
2  —8 uses as in:
demonstrate to protest
All over Oceania this morning there were irrepressible spontaneous demonstrations when workers marched out of factories and offices and paraded through the streets with banners voicing their gratitude to Big Brother for the new, happy life which his wise leadership has bestowed upon us.
demonstrations = public displays of support

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tions", converts a verb into a plural noun that denotes results of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in actions, illustrations, and observations.)
From page 58.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of demonstrate means:
a public display supporting a cause — usually joining with others in a political protest
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 1.2, p.22.4
Web Links
differentiate
3 uses
1  —1 use as in:
differentiate our product
He began speaking with the peculiar grave courtesy that differentiated him from the majority of Inner Party members.
differentiated = made different
From page 157.4  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of differentiate means:
to make different; or to show difference
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 2.6 (14), p.157.4
Web Links
unquizzed meaning  —2 uses
establish   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 7 uses
1  —5 uses as in:
establish a positive tone
He thought also of hurrying to the Community Centre and staying there till the place closed, so as to establish a partial alibi for the evening.
establish = create
From page 101.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of establish means:
create, start, or set in [a] place
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library25 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 2.9 (17), p.203.4
Web Links
2  —2 uses as in:
establish that there is a need
For how could you establish even the most obvious fact when there existed no record outside your own memory?
establish = prove
From page 35.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of establish means:
show or determine (cause to be recognized or figure out)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 3.4 (22), p.275.9
Web Links
heresy
20 uses
The Russians persecuted heresy more cruelly than the Inquisition had done.
heresy = beliefs considered to be immoral
From page 254.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally heresy means:
opinions or actions most people consider immoral
Word Statistics
Book20 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.4, p.45.7
Web Links
imply
2 uses
Even the written instructions which Winston received, and which he invariably got rid of as soon as he had dealt with them, never stated or implied that an act of forgery was to be committed: always the reference was to slips, errors, misprints, or misquotations which it was necessary to put right in the interests of accuracy.
implied = suggested
From page 40.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally imply means:
to suggest or say indirectly — possibly as a logical consequence
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 1.4, p.40.8
Web Links
infer
2 uses
There was no physical act, no word spoken aloud, that they had not noticed, no train of thought that they had not been able to infer.
infer = figure out by reasoning
From page 276.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally infer means:
to figure out or guess by reasoning
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 2.9 (17), p.208.1
Web Links
obsolete
4 uses
Then he went on: 'What I had really intended to say was that in your article I noticed you had used two words which have become obsolete.'
obsolete = replaced with something better
From page 158.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally obsolete means:
no longer in general use because it was replaced by something better
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 1.5, p.51.1
Web Links
orthodox
21 uses
Orthodoxy means not thinking — not needing to think.
orthodoxy = conforming to commonly accepted beliefs and behaviors
From page 53.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally orthodox means:
normal (describing thinking or behavior as commonly or traditionally accepted)
Word Statistics
Book21 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.1, p.10.5
Web Links
rectify
8 uses
The messages he had received referred to articles or news items which for one reason or another it was thought necessary to alter, or, as the official phrase had it, to rectify.
rectify = correct
From page 38.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of rectify means:
correct, fix, or make right
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.4, p.44
Web Links
relevant
4 uses
But the really relevant date was seven or eight years earlier.
relevant = important to the issue in question

(editor's note: This is from the scene in the book when a scrap of newspaper missed destruction and fell into Winston's hands year's later. It was the only time he ever had "concrete evidence" that the Party changed recorded history. The "relevant date" was the date in history that was changed.)
From page 75.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally relevant means:
relating in a meaningful way to the issue in question
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 2.7 (15), p.165.6
Web Links
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