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1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four) by Orwell
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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abstruse
1 use
...the argument as to what they were supposedly arguing about grew extraordinarily involved and abstruse,
abstruse = difficult to understand
DefinitionGenerally abstruse means:
difficult to understand; or not known by the great majority of people
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 23
Web Links
adulation
1 use
Even the humblest Party member is expected to be competent, industrious, and even intelligent within narrow limits, but it is also necessary that he should be a credulous and ignorant fanatic whose prevailing moods are fear, hatred, adulation, and orgiastic triumph.
adulation = much admiration and praise
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 17
Web Links
approach   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 11 uses
1  —10 uses as in:
approached the city
He believed in the principles of Ingsoc, he venerated Big Brother, he rejoiced over victories, he hated heretics, not merely with sincerity but with a sort of restless zeal, an up-to-dateness of information, which the ordinary Party member did not approach.
approach = get near
DefinitionGenerally this sense of approach means:
to get closer to
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library88 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
use the best approach
But in matters of vital importance — meaning, in effect, war and police espionage — the empirical approach is still encouraged, or at least tolerated.
approach = technique (way of doing something)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of approach means:
a way of doing something; or a route that leads to a particular place
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 17
Web Links
Big Brother
78 uses
BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU, the caption beneath it ran.
Big Brother = a person or organization that attempts to exercise total control over people and that invades their privacy to do so

(That is the common meaning of the expression today. The expression was popularized by this novel where it references the government in the novel.)
Word Statistics
Book78 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
credulous
2 uses
Even the humblest Party member is expected to be competent, industrious, and even intelligent within narrow limits, but it is also necessary that he should be a credulous and ignorant fanatic whose...
credulous = more willing to believe than is logical
DefinitionGenerally credulous means:
gullible (being too willing to believe)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
debauchery
2 uses
Mere debauchery did not matter very much, so long as it was furtive and joyless and only involved the women of a submerged and despised class.
debauchery = behavior involving excessive drinking and/or casual sex
DefinitionGenerally debauchery means:
excessive drinking, casual sex, and/or drug abuse while partying — possibly for an evening, but often implying a wasteful, decadent life
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
denounce
12 uses
Katharine would unquestionably have denounced him to the Thought Police if she had not happened to be too stupid to detect the unorthodoxy of his opinions.
denounced = informed against him (turned him in)
DefinitionGenerally denounce means:
to strongly criticize or accuse publicly

or more rarely:  to inform against someone (turn someone into the authorities)
Word Statistics
Book12 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
didactic
1 use
'It was a common punishment in Imperial China,' said O'Brien as didactically as ever.
didactically = describing someone excessively inclined to instruct
DefinitionGenerally didactic means:
describing something intended to instruct; or someone excessively inclined to instruct
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22
Web Links
digress
2 uses
"All this is a digression," he added in a different tone.
digression = off the main topic (wandering from a direct course)
DefinitionGenerally digress means:
wander from a direct or straight course — especially verbally
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 23
Web Links
doctrine
10 uses
Except where it touched upon her own life she had no interest in Party doctrine.
doctrine = a belief (or system of beliefs or principles) accepted as authoritative by some group
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
fallacy
3 uses
Had it not been exposed long ago as a fallacy?
fallacy = a misconception resulting from incorrect reasoning
DefinitionGenerally fallacy means:
a misconception resulting from incorrect reasoning; or a common form of incorrect reasoning
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 20
Web Links
frontier
10 uses
1  —10 uses as in:
the frontier of Tibet
The frontiers between the three super-states are in some places arbitrary, and in others they fluctuate according to the fortunes of war, but in general they follow geographical lines.
frontiers = international boundaries
DefinitionGenerally this sense of frontier means:
an international boundary or a wilderness at the edge of a settled area
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 17
Web Links
hedonist
1 use
It is the exact opposite of the stupid hedonistic Utopias that the old reformers imagined.
hedonistic = placing pleasure as the highest good
DefinitionGenerally hedonist means:
someone most motivated by pleasures — often sensual pleasures
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 20
Web Links
invariably
10 uses
Books, also, were recalled and rewritten again and again, and were invariably reissued without any admission that any alteration had been made.
invariably = without exception or variation
DefinitionGenerally invariably means:
consistently or without variation
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
minuteness   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
minute size; or minute description
The scientist of today is either a mixture of psychologist and inquisitor, studying with real ordinary minuteness the meaning of facial expressions, gestures, and tones of voice, and testing the truth-producing effects of drugs, shock therapy, hypnosis, and physical torture; or he is chemist, physicist, or biologist concerned only with such branches of his special subject as are relevant to the taking of life.
minuteness = attention to detail
DefinitionGenerally this sense of minuteness means:
very small

or:

detailed (including even small considerations); or careful (done with care)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 17
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
keep the minutes
But there were other days when they settled down to their work almost eagerly, making a tremendous show of entering up their minutes and drafting long memoranda which were never finished — when the argument as to what they were supposedly arguing about grew extraordinarily involved and abstruse, with subtle haggling over definitions, enormous digressions, quarrels threats, even, to appeal to higher authority.†
minutes = formal notes
DefinitionGenerally this sense of minutes means:
a written record of what happened at a meeting
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 23
Web Links
prosaic
1 use
'We're not dead yet,' said Julia prosaically.
prosaically = in a matter-of-fact manner (a bland manner — as though unconcerned)
DefinitionGenerally prosaic means:
lacking anything unusual, interesting, or challenging
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
repudiate
1 use
to repudiate morality while laying claim to it,
repudiate = strongly reject
DefinitionGenerally repudiate means:
strong rejection — especially when the idea or thing being rejected was once embraced
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
servile
1 use
'Are you guilty?' said Winston.
"Of course I'm guilty!" cried Parsons with a servile glance at the telescreen. "You don't think the Party would arrest an innocent man, do you? ... Thoughtcrime is a dreadful thing,"
servile = so excessively submissive and eager to please that he seems to have no self-respect
DefinitionGenerally servile means:
submissive — typically excessively so (so submissive or eager to serve and please that one seems to have no self-respect)

or:

relating to the work that requires obeying demeaning commands

or:

slave-like or relating to slaves
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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