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1984 by Orwell

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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altercation
2 uses
The old man whom he had followed was standing at the bar, having some kind of altercation with the barman,
altercation = noisy argument
From page 87.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally altercation means:
a noisy argument, confrontation, or fight
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1.8, p.85.1
Web Links
Big Brother
38 uses
BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU, the caption beneath it ran.
Big Brother = an organization that attempts to exercise total control over people and that invades their privacy to do so

(That is the common meaning of the expression today. The expression was popularized by this novel where it references the government in the story.)
From page 2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally Big Brother means:
a person or organization that attempts to exercise total control over people and that invades their privacy to do so
Word Statistics
Book38 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.1, p.2
Web Links
convey
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
convey her thoughts
The rigidity of her muscles managed to convey that impression.
convey = communicate or express
From page 67  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 1.6, p.67
Web Links
definitive
4 uses
'The Eleventh Edition is the definitive edition,' he said.
definitive = best possible
From page 50.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally definitive means:
beyond question

or:

the best possible or final answer or solution

or:

of something that defines or distinguishes a category
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2.9 (17), p.186.9
Web Links
digress
2 uses
"All this is a digression," he added in a different tone.
digression = not about the main topic

(editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
From page 266.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally digress means:
wander from a direct or straight course — typically verbally
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.6 (24), p.294.9
Web Links
discredit
4 uses
It consisted in falsifying a series of production reports of two years ago, in such a way as to cast discredit on a prominent member of the Inner Party, who was now under a cloud.
discredit = damage of reputation
From page 109.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally discredit means:
damage the reputation of — often causing distrust of or disbelief in
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.5, p.55.4
Web Links
dissemble
1 use
To dissemble your feelings, to control your face, to do what everyone else was doing, was an instinctive reaction.
dissemble = hide the truth of
From page 17.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally dissemble means:
hide or disguise the truth without outright lying
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.1, p.17.1
Web Links
doctrine
10 uses
It is also that no change in doctrine or in political alignment can ever be admitted.
doctrine = beliefs and principles
From page 213.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally doctrine means:
a belief (or system of beliefs or principles) accepted as authoritative by some group
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1.1, p.12.7
Web Links
empirical
3 uses
The empirical method of thought, on which all the scientific achievements of the past were founded, is opposed to the most fundamental principles of Ingsoc.
empirical = based on experience or observation
From page 193.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally empirical means:
based on experience or observation rather than theory
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 2.9 (17), p.189.3
Web Links
fallacy
3 uses
If he thinks he floats off the floor, and if I simultaneously think I see him do it, then the thing happens. ... the thought burst into his mind: 'It doesn't really happen. We imagine it. It is hallucination.' He pushed the thought under instantly. The fallacy was obvious. It presupposed that somewhere or other, outside oneself, there was a 'real' world where 'real' things happened.
fallacy = a common form of incorrect reasoning

(editor's note: This is when Winston is succumbing to brainwashing.)
From page 278.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally fallacy means:
a mistaken belief; or a common form of incorrect reasoning
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.3 (21), p.266.4
Web Links
fluctuate
2 uses
The frontiers between the three super-states are in some places arbitrary, and in others they fluctuate according to the fortunes of war, but in general they follow geographical lines.
fluctuate = change back and forth
From page 185.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally fluctuate means:
to alternately increase and decrease in quantity
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 2.9 (17), p.185.8
Web Links
foreshadow
1 use
It was only after a decade of national wars, civil wars, revolutions, and counter-revolutions in all parts of the world that Ingsoc and its rivals emerged as fully worked-out political theories. But they had been foreshadowed by the various systems, generally called totalitarian, which had appeared earlier...
foreshadowed = indicated (hinted at or made predictable)
From page 205.2  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally foreshadow means:
to be a sign of future events
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 2.9 (17), p.205.2
Web Links
passage
2 uses
He took out of the drawer a copy of a children's history textbook which he had borrowed from Mrs Parsons, and began copying a passage into the diary: In the old days (it ran), before the glorious Revolution, London was not the beautiful city that we know today.
passage = a short part of a longer written work
From page 72.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 1.7, p.72.5
Web Links
servile
1 use
"Are you guilty?" said Winston.
"Of course I'm guilty!" cried Parsons with a servile glance at the telescreen. "You don't think the Party would arrest an innocent man, do you? ... Thoughtcrime is a dreadful thing,"
servile = excessively submissive
From page 233.2  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally servile means:
submissive — typically excessively so (so submissive or eager to serve and please that one seems to have no self-respect)

or:

relating to the work that requires obeying demeaning commands

or:

slave-like or relating to slaves
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.1 (19), p.233.2
Web Links
strata
1 use
But this was concrete evidence; it was a fragment of the abolished past, like a fossil bone which turns up in the wrong stratum and destroys a geological theory.
stratum = layer

(editor's note:  Strata, the plural form of this word is used much more commonly than the singular form. Many Latin words that end in "um" are made plural by changing the "um" to "a"—such as stratum to strata, bacterium to bacteria, and millennium to millennia. In modern writing, changing the "um" to "ums" is also accepted for many Latin words ending in um, but not for any of those listed above.)
From page 78.8  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally strata means:
layers

or:

levels, classes, or groups into which people or other things are divided
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.7, p.78.8
Web Links
subtle   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 8 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
a subtle poison
Or Katharine would die, and by subtle maneuverings Winston and Julia would succeed in getting married.
subtle = indirect or hidden
From page 151.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of subtle means:
working in an indirect or hidden way
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 1.3, p.35.5
Web Links
2  —6 uses as in:
a subtle difference or thinker
His heart sank as he thought of the enormous power arrayed against him, the ease with which any Party intellectual would overthrow him in debate, the subtle arguments which he would not be able to understand, much less answer.
subtle = requiring fine distinctions and relevant knowledge
From page 81.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of subtle means:
not obvious, but understandable by someone with adequate sensitivity and relevant knowledge (perhaps depending upon fine distinctions)

or:

capable of understanding things that require sensitivity and relevant knowledge (perhaps understanding fine distinctions)
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 2.9 (17), p.215.5
Web Links
tacit
3 uses
Not merely the validity of experience, but the very existence of external reality, was tacitly denied by their philosophy.
tacitly = indirectly
From page 80.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally tacit means:
implied or understood, but not expressed directly
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.6, p.65.2
Web Links
yield   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 3 uses
1  —1 use as in:
will yield valuable data
All of the disputed territories contain valuable minerals, and some of them yield important vegetable products such as rubber which in colder climates it is necessary to synthesize by comparatively expensive methods.
yield = produce
From page 187.6  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of yield means:
to produce (usually something wanted); or the thing or amount produced
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 2.9 (17), p.187.6
Web Links
2  —2 uses as in:
yield to pressure
It was filled with some kind of heavy, sand-like stuff which yielded wherever you touched it.
yielded = gave way (was pushed back)
From page 140.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of yield means:
to give in, give way, or give up
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library13 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.2 (10), p.124.6
Web Links
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