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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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affront
1 use
We'll take these fellows to the tavern and affront them with t'other couple, and I reckon we'll find out SOMETHING before we get through.
affront = create a confrontational face-to-face exchange

(editor's note:  This is a less common sense of affront that is sometimes seen in classic literature. Today it more commonly references an intentional insult.)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of affront means:
an intentional insult; or to intentionally insult
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 29
Web Links
aggravate
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
she aggravates me
if we minded our business and didn't talk back and aggravate them, we would pull through
aggravate = annoy or irritate
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 15
Web Links
candid
1 use
This is a surprise to me which I wasn't looking for; and I'll acknowledge, candid and frank, I ain't very well fixed to meet it and answer it;
candid = honest and direct
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 29
Web Links
contrived
2 uses
Why, I spotted you for a boy when you was threading the needle; and I contrived the other things just to make certain.
contrived = made up (arranged)
DefinitionGenerally contrived means:
unnatural seeming (due to careful planning)

or more rarely:

arranged (that something should happen)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
desperado
1 use
At last she come and begun to ask me questions, but I COULDN'T answer them straight, I didn't know which end of me was up; because these men was in such a fidget now that some was wanting to start right NOW and lay for them desperadoes, and saying it warn't but a few minutes to midnight; and others was trying to get them to hold on and wait for the sheep-signal; and here was Aunty pegging away at the questions, and me a-shaking all over and ready to sink down in my tracks I was that...
desperadoes = bold outlaws
DefinitionGenerally desperado means:
a bold outlaw — especially from the American old west
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 40
Web Links
dialect
4 uses
In this book a number of dialects are used,
dialects = regional varieties of a language
DefinitionGenerally dialect means:
a regional variety of a language
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useIntr.
Web Links
dismal
3 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
a dismal expression
If you think it ain't dismal and lonesome out in a fog that way by yourself in the night, you try it once—you'll see.
dismal = depressing or gloomy
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
domestic
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
domestic happiness
They had white domestic awnings in front, and the country people hitched their horses to the awning-posts.
domestic = relating to a home
DefinitionGenerally this sense of domestic means:
relating to a home or family
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 21
Web Links
evade
5 uses
1  —5 uses as in:
evade the enemy
...if the evasion worked all right and he managed to...
evasion = getting away from
DefinitionGenerally this sense of evade means:
physically avoid or get away from; or: said of something that is hard to obtain
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 39
Web Links
fraudulent
4 uses
You're a fraud, that's what you are!
fraud = someone who deceives others
DefinitionGenerally fraudulent means:
intentional deception — usually for financial gain or ego
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 25
Web Links
impudent
3 uses
you impudent young rascal
impudent = disrespectful
DefinitionGenerally impudent means:
improperly bold or disrespectful — especially toward someone who is older or considered to be of higher status
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 33
Web Links
meddle
6 uses
...and if anybody ever come meddling around...
meddling = intruding in other people's affairs or business
DefinitionGenerally meddle means:
intrude in other people's affairs or business
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 24
Web Links
nabob
1 use
He had the whitest shirt on you ever see, too, and the shiniest hat; and there ain't a man in that town that's got as fine clothes as what he had; and he had a gold watch and chain, and a silver-headed cane—the awfulest old gray-headed nabob in the State.
nabob = a rich or powerful person
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
ornery
13 uses
I felt so ornery and low down and mean that I says to myself;  I'll hive that money for them or bust.
ornery = cranky (easily annoyed and quick to complain and argue)

(editor's note:  Twain also uses ornery to describe someone as "low down", "coarse", or "unrefined".)
Word Statistics
Book13 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
palaver
1 use
Don't stand there palavering all day, but out with you and see if there's a fish on the lines for breakfast.
palavering = talking (about nothing important)
DefinitionGenerally palaver means:
talk — typically empty talk or flattery
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
remiss
1 use
"Well, Sally, I'm in fault, and I acknowledge it; I've been remiss; but I won't let to-morrow go by without stopping up them holes."
remiss = careless in not doing a duty well enough
DefinitionGenerally remiss means:
careless — especially with regard to a duty
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 37
Web Links
Richard III
5 uses
The first good town we come to we'll hire a hall and do the sword fight in Richard III. and the balcony scene in Romeo and Juliet.
Richard III = King of England from 1483 to 1485
DefinitionGenerally Richard III means:
King of England from 1483 to 1485; seized the throne from his nephew Edward V who was confined to the Tower of London and murdered; his reign ended when he was defeated by Henry Tudor (later Henry VII) at the battle of Bosworth Field (1452-1485)
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 20
Web Links
scoundrel
3 uses
After all this long journey, and after all we'd done for them scoundrels, here it was all come to nothing, everything all busted up and ruined, because they could have the heart to serve Jim such a trick as that, and make him a slave again all his life, and amongst strangers, too, for forty dirty dollars.
scoundrels = people without moral principles
DefinitionGenerally scoundrel means:
someone without moral principles
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 31
Web Links
tedious
2 uses
It was most pesky tedious hard work and slow,
tedious = boring
DefinitionGenerally tedious means:
boring — especially because something goes on too long or without variation
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 38
Web Links
temperance
3 uses
First they done a lecture on temperance; but they didn't make enough for them both to get drunk on.
temperance = discouraging the drinking of alcohol
DefinitionGenerally temperance means:
not drinking alcohol because it is thought to be harmful

or:

moderation (not doing something excessively) — such as not eating or drinking too much
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
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