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coax

used in a sentence
2 meanings
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1  —as in:
coax her to join us
Definition try to obtain a result through gentle and careful effort — often gentle persuasion
  • Although she has retired from public life, we are going to try to coax her to accept the award.
coax = gently persuade
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • Let's see if we can coax her into coming with us.
  • coax = gently persuade
  • Do you think you can coax the secret out of her?
  • coax = obtain through persuasion
  • Do you think you can coax it into position?
  • coax = obtain a result through gentle and careful effort
  • Her voice had been gentle at first, coaxing, but when I didn't answer, when I stayed away, it had turned to fury.
    Tara Westover  --  Educated
  • coaxing = gently persuading
  • I have three very particular friends who have been all dying for him in their turn; and the pains which they, their mothers (very clever women), as well as my dear aunt and myself, have taken to reason, coax, or trick him into marrying, is inconceivable!
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • coax = gently persuade
  • All morning Sunday, she tried to coax him into seeing Graham again.
    Laura Hillenbrand  --  Unbroken
  • coax = gently persuade
  • Peeta's a whiz with fires, coaxing a blaze out of the damp wood.
    Suzanne Collins  --  The Hunger Games
  • coaxing = obtaining a result through careful effort
  • It was a very lively march on account of the new elephants, who gave trouble at every ford, and needed coaxing or beating every other minute.
    Rudyard Kipling  --  The Jungle Book
  • coaxing = gentle persuasion
  • I made him a little surprise dinner, thinking I could coax the proposal out of him.
    Kiera Cass  --  The Selection
coax = obtain a result through gentle and careful effort

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —as in:
run coax between the rooms
Definition short for coaxial cable (a type of electrical cable used to carry information signals)

(Coaxial cables have a conducting wire surrounded by an insulating layer surrounded by a shield. The insulating layer and shield surround a common axis—the conducting wire.)
  • The coax has gold-plated connectors to resist corrosion.
coax = a type of electrical cable used to carry information signals
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • Coax was invented well over a century ago to minimize signal loss.
  • coax = a type of electrical cable used to carry information signals
  • A waveguide is similar to a coax cable except that it has no inner conductor.
coax = a type of electrical cable used to carry information signals

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®Pictures — Google Images®Wikipedia® Article
Less commonly:
Less commonly, in classic literature, you may see coax used as a synonym for caress or fondle.
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