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vocabulary
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confront

used in a sentence
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Definition to deal directly with an unpleasant situation or person

or:

to challenge someone — often by presenting evidence
  • You must confront your problems.
confront = deal directly with an unpleasant situation
  • You must confront your opponent.
  • confront = deal directly with an unpleasant situation
  • We confronted him with the evidence.
  • But he did not confront his parents with what he knew, then or ever. He chose instead to make a secret of his dark knowledge and express his rage obliquely, in silence and sullen withdrawal.
    Jon Krakauer  --  Into the Wild
  • confront = deal directly with an unpleasant situation
  • Or if you want to confront Jack about it, fine.
    R.J. Palacio  --  Wonder
  • confront = deal directly with an unpleasant situation or person
  • HATHORNE, with a gleam of victory: And yet, when people accused of witchery confronted you in court, you would faint, saying their spirits came out of their bodies and choked you—
    Arthur Miller  --  The Crucible
  • confronted = challenged
  • Confronted by a situation which they had never faced before, and having no memories from which to find either solace or wisdom, they would not know what to do and would seek his advice.
    Lois Lowry  --  The Giver
  • confronted = challenged
  • Mr. Ewell backed up into the witness chair, settled himself, and regarded Atticus with haughty suspicion, an expression common to Maycomb County witnesses when confronted by opposing counsel.
    Harper Lee  --  To Kill a Mockingbird
  • confronted = faced or challenged
  • He also ached for a chance to confront Janza.
    Robert Cormier  --  The Chocolate War
  • confront = challenge
  • No one in my family or my circle of friends had ever had to confront something like this.
    Nicholas Sparks  --  A Walk to Remember
  • confront = face (deal with an unpleasant situation)
  • It's high time we leave Ellesmera and confront our fate, whatever it may be.
    Christopher Paolini  --  Eldest
  • confront = deal directly with an unpleasant situation
  • He had ignored her until this moment of confrontation.
    Robert Cormier  --  After the First Death
  • confrontation = an argument or a hostile situation
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • While my original plan called for me to confront you right then and there, I jumped to the side—out of the doorway.
    Jay Asher  --  Thirteen Reasons Why
  • confront = to challenge someone or deal directly with an unpleasant situation with them
  • She shut her eyes tiredly, suddenly unwilling to confront her warring emotions.
    Nicholas Sparks  --  Message in a Bottle
  • confront = deal directly with a difficult situation
  • He wait until I confront them on it ... then he wanna come crying seniority.
    August Wilson  --  Fences
  • confront = deal directly with an unpleasant situation
  • Mildred backed away as if she were suddenly confronted by a pack of mice that had come up out of the floor.
    Ray Bradbury  --  Fahrenheit 451
  • confronted = faced or challenged
  • I'm going to her house, to confront her on why she ditched me.
    Simone Elkeles  --  Perfect Chemistry
  • confront = deal directly with an unpleasant situation
  • Did you confront your father?
    Robert Cormier  --  I Am the Cheese
  • confront = to deal directly with (regarding an unpleasant situation)
  • People don't like being confronted with things they don't understand, I guess.
    John Corey Whaley  --  Nogin
  • confronted = deal directly with an unpleasant situation with someone
  • flight as escape or confrontation; mercy the unspoken wish of the novel's population.
    Toni Morrison  --  Song of Solomon
confrontation = challenge
(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)

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