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affectation
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Definition behaving in an artificial way to make an impression
  • She is comfortable in her own skin and meets strangers without affectation.
affectation = behaving in an artificial way to make an impression
  • Her apparent wealth was proven to be an affectation.
  • affectation = something displayed with artificial behavior to make an impression
  • He's a good actor. He can change affectations and mannerisms like most people change clothes.
  • A plain speaker without airs or affectations, the chief fostered a spirit of collegiality among...
    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg of Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist  --  http://www.cnn.com/2005/LAW/09/04/rehnquist.reaction/index.html (retrieved 04/03/08)
  • affectations = things done in an artificial way to make an impression
  • "I'm Cinna, your stylist," he says in a quiet voice somewhat lacking in the Capitol's affectations.
    Suzanne Collins  --  The Hunger Games
  • affectations = things done in an artificial way to make an impression
  • Zooey gave a genuine roar of laughter, as if he clearly relished seeing any affectation brought to light, his own included.
    J.D. Salinger  --  Franny and Zooey
  • affectation = artificial behavior to make an impression
  • In many senses, the Baroque period was characterized by vanity or affectation.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie's World
  • affectation = behaving in an artificial way to make an impression
  • He hated his mother's affectations.
    Oscar Wilde  --  The Picture of Dorian Gray
  • affectations = things done in an artificial way to make an impression
  • no pride, vanity, or affectation
    Jonathan Swift  --  Gulliver's Travels
  • affectation = behaving in an artificial way to make an impression
  • Those who knew me formerly thought my name was freakish and an affectation of Frenchiness.
    Jon Krakauer  --  Into the Wild
  • affectation = something taken on artificially to make an impression
  • Fagin's affectation of humanity
    Charles Dickens  --  Oliver Twist
  • affectation = behaving in an artificial way to make an impression
  • Though his voice has yet to change, he has no feminine affectations.
    Ron Suskind  --  A Hope in the Unseen
  • affectations = artificial traits put on to make an impression
  • What I finally realized were affectations—the smoking jacket that he sometimes wore to school and his foreign cigarettes, which were actually his mother's—I thought were evidence of his higher breeding.
    Alice Sebold  --  The Lovely Bones
  • affectations = things done in an artificial way to make an impression
  • [Speaking of Jordan Baker] The bored haughty face that she turned to the world concealed something — most affectations conceal something eventually, even though they don't in the beginning — and one day I found what it was. ... She was incurably dishonest.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald  --  The Great Gatsby
  • affectations = things done in an artificial way to make an impression
  • Eunice [affectedly casual]:
    Tennessee Williams  --  A Streetcar Named Desire
  • affectedly = pretending to be
  • I hate this affectation of youth, sir.
    Oscar Wilde  --  An Ideal Husband
  • affectation = behaving in an artificial way to make an impression
  • If Dolores knew, she would crawl up in her blanket of affectations and die circumspectly.
    Maya Angelou  --  I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings
  • affectations = things done in an artificial way to make an impression
  • I assure you, Watson, without affectation, that the status of my client is a matter of less moment to me than the interest of his case.
    Arthur Conan Doyle  --  The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes
  • affectation = behaving in an artificial way to make an impression
  • The peculiar man waved a lazy wave at Ford and with an appalling affectation of nonchalance said, "Ford, hi, how are you?"
    Douglas Adams  --  The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
  • affectation = behaving in an artificial way to make an impression
  • no ... phrase that might indite the author of affectation;
    William Shakespeare  --  Hamlet, Prince of Denmark
affectation = trying to show off

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