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undulate

used in a sentence
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Definition a smooth wave-like motion (physical or auditory)

or:

having a wavy or rippled form or surface
  • A sidewinding snake uses less energy to cover the same distance as a laterally undulating snake uses.
undulating = moving with smooth wave-like movements
  • The dancers' arms undulated in unison to add to the ethereal effect.
  • A silver ring fish floated by them, undulating, and closing like an iris, instantly, around food particles, to assimilate them.
    Ray Bradbury  --  The Martian Chronicles
  • undulating = moving with a smooth wave-like motion
  • His arm, a long molasses undulation,
    Ray Bradbury  --  Something Wicked This Way Comes
  • undulation = a smooth wave-like motion; or having a wavy or rippled form
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • John was asleep and I hated to waken him, so I kept still and watched the moonlight on that undulating wall-paper till I felt creepy.
    Charlotte Perkins Gilman  --  The Yellow Wallpaper
  • undulating = wavy or rippled
  • Above, the surface of the water was an undulating mirror of brightness,
    John Steinbeck  --  The Pearl
  • undulating = rippling
  • The interference undulates and rises.
    Haruki Murakami  --  After Dark
  • undulates = makes a smooth wave-like motion (physical or auditory)
  • followed her through the door straight into a pool of red and undulating light that locked him where he stood.
    Toni Morrison  --  Beloved
  • undulating = a smooth wave-like motion (physical or auditory)

    or:

    having a wavy or rippled form or surface
  • The wide bosom of the Tappan Zee lay motionless and glassy, excepting that here and there a gentle undulation waved and prolonged the blue shadow of the distant mountain.
    Washington Irving  --  The Legend of Sleepy Hollow
  • undulation = smooth wave-like motion
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • If you had watched your patient carefully you would have seen this undulation in every department of his life—his interest in his work, his affection for his friends, his physical appetites, all go up and down.
    C.S. Lewis  --  The Screwtape Letters
  • undulation = wave-like movement
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • (NICK and MARTHA move apart now and dance on either side of where GEORGE and HONEY are sitting; they face each other, and while their feet move but little, their bodies undulate congruently. . . . . It is as if they were pressed together)
    Edward Albee  --  Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
  • undulate = move in a smooth wave-like motion
  • From time to time she would open her mouth wide, and I could see her tongue undulate faintly.
    Harper Lee  --  To Kill a Mockingbird
  • undulate = move in a wave-like motion
  • The curtains undulated
  • The singer's voice undulated
  • At most you feel them as a whisper or the wave of a whisper undulating down.
    Alice Sebold  --  The Lovely Bones
  • I saw some of the strands in front of the cave-mouth hesitate, undulate, and then come drifting inwards.
    John Wyndham  --  The Chrysalids
  • All summer Perry undulated between half-awake stupors and sickly, sweat-drenched sleep.
    Truman Capote  --  In Cold Blood
  • She had an undulating, but oftentimes a sharp and irregular movement.
    Nathaniel Hawthorne  --  The Scarlet Letter
  • Ripples of cold undulated over Harry's skin.
    J.K. Rowling  --  Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
  • I tried to follow his gaze, but there was only the smoke — dense, oily smoke twisting low to the ground, rising lazily, undulating against the grass.
    Stephenie Meyer  --  Eclipse

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