toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books

petulant

used in a sentence
(click/touch triangles for details)
Definition unreasonably annoyed or upset

or:

easily annoyed or upset
  • She stomped her foot like a petulant child.
petulant = unreasonably annoyed or upset
  • She is petulant by nature and was clearly insulted by the question.
  • petulant = easily annoyed
  • There are days when all I want is to be free of him and his petulance and neediness.
    Khaled Hosseini  --  And The Mountains Echoed
  • petulance = tendency to be unreasonably annoyed or upset
  • "I wish I knew who it is," said Malfoy petulantly.
    J.K. Rowling  --  Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
  • petulantly = in an annoyed manner
  • At other times, she would turn petulantly away, and hide her face in her hands, or even push him off angrily; and then he took care to let her alone, for he was certain of doing no good.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • petulantly = with unreasonable anger or upset
  • "She wasn't at all like I thought she'd be," Sebastian went on petulantly.
    Cassandra Clare  --  City of Glass
  • petulantly = with unreasonable upset
  • ...Lily said petulantly.
    Lois Lowry  --  The Giver
  • petulantly = while upset in a childish way
  • "No; nor will she miss now," cries The Vengeance, petulantly.
    Charles Dickens  --  A Tale of Two Cities
  • petulantly = with unreasonable anger or upset
  • There was nothing of the real Jack in that howling ... petulant voice, though.
    Stephen King  --  The Shining
  • petulant = unreasonably upset
  • You can be as petulant as you want, tomorrow. Today, though, I'd appreciate it if you would keep your mind on the examination.
    Orson Scott Card  --  Ender's Game
  • petulant = unreasonably upset
  • And the baby was weary and petulant, and he cried softly until Juana gave him her breast,
    John Steinbeck  --  The Pearl
  • petulant = unreasonably upset
  • He heard the petulance in his own voice.
    Cornelia Funke  --  Inkheart
  • petulance = unreasonable annoyance or upset
  • I couldn't imagine petulant little Jane surrendering her advantage, even to learn.
    Stephenie Meyer  --  Breaking Dawn
  • petulant = prone to be unreasonably annoyed or upset
  • For more than a year they had waited on a Queen who was petulant, cruel, contradictory, miserable.
    T. H. White  --  The Once and Future King
  • petulant = prone to be unreasonably annoyed or upset
  • "I'm angry with you, Emil," she broke out with petulance.
    Willa Cather  --  O Pioneers!
  • petulance = unreasonably upset
  • The man in the yellow suit raised his eyebrows and a nervous petulance came into his voice.
    Natalie Babbitt  --  Tuck Everlasting
  • petulance = unreasonably annoyed or upset tone
  • "There's always been a lottery," he added petulantly.
    Shirley Jackson  --  The Lottery
  • petulantly = in an annoyed or upset manner
  • "But we're just sitting here," he said, sounding petulant and tired and cross.
    Stephen King  --  Cujo
  • petulant = unreasonably annoyed or upset
  • "Thunder!" he remarked petulantly.
    Stephen Crane  --  The Red Badge of Courage
  • petulantly = with unreasonable anger or upset
  • HONEY (Petulantly): No! If I can't do my interpretive dance, I don't want to dance with anyone.
    Edward Albee  --  Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
petulantly = with unreasonable upset

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
Search for other examples by interest
InterestSource
General — Google News®
General — Time® Magazine
General — Wikipedia®