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incarnate

used in a sentence
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Definition embody (made real in a material sense) — especially in the form of a human body, but sometimes figuratively
  • She described him as the devil incarnate.
incarnate = in the form of a human body
  • He described the company as creative capitalism incarnate.
  • incarnate = made real in a material sense
  • Tolkien referred to his Lord of the Rings character, Gandalf, as an angel incarnate.
  • incarnate = in the form of a human body
  • It is John that explicitly introduces Jesus as God incarnate.
    Gospel - Wikipedia  --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gospels (retrieved 05/20/06)
  • incarnate = embodied
  • Most Christians are Trinitarian and believe that Jesus is simultaneously the Son of God and God made incarnate, sent to provide salvation and reconciliation with God by atoning for the sins of humanity.
    Jesus - Wikipedia  --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus (retrieved 05/20/06)
  • I had read of such hideous incarnate demons.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • incarnate = embodied
  • He's forgotten that Justice incarnate is not only balancing the scales but also blindfolded.
    John Knowles  --  A Separate Peace
  • incarnate = in the form of a human body
  • What crime was this that lived incarnate in this sequestered mansion, and could neither be expelled nor subdued by the owner?
    Charlotte Bronte  --  Jane Eyre
  • incarnate = made real in a material sense
  • That man was a genius, that man was success incarnate!
    Arthur Miller  --  Death of a Salesman
  • incarnate = embodied
  • He's enjoying this, I thought bitterly, he's imagining himself Justice incarnate, balancing the scales.
    John Knowles  --  A Separate Peace
  • incarnate = embodied
  • And all at once a great synthetic bass boomed out the words which announced the approaching atonement and final consummation of solidarity, the coming of the Twelve-in-One, the incarnation of the Greater Being.
    Aldous Huxley  --  Brave New World
  • incarnation = made real in a material sense
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Necessity compelled me to seek shelter here; though, if I had not learned he was out of the way, I'd have halted at the kitchen, washed my face, warmed myself, got you to bring what I wanted, and departed again to anywhere out of the reach of my accursed — of that incarnate goblin!
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • incarnate = embodied
  • I had a theoretical reverence and homage for beauty, elegance, gallantry, fascination; but had I met those qualities incarnate in masculine shape, I should have known instinctively that they neither had nor could have sympathy with anything in me, and should have shunned them as one would fire, lightning, or anything else that is bright but antipathetic.
    Charlotte Bronte  --  Jane Eyre
  • incarnate = embodied
  • Drawn by the fascination of the horror of pain and, from within, impelled by that habit of cooperation, that desire for unanimity and atonement, which their conditioning had so ineradicably implanted in them, they began to mime the frenzy of his gestures, striking at one another as the Savage struck at his own rebellious flesh, or at that plump incarnation of turpitude writhing in the heather at his feet.
    Aldous Huxley  --  Brave New World
  • incarnation = embodiment
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • He had decided to live there because the view was so beautiful, because, from his vantage point, he seemed to be looking out on to the incarnation of a divine being.
    Aldous Huxley  --  Brave New World
  • incarnation = made real in a material sense
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Only in faith can truth become incarnate and reason truly human.
    Pope Benedict XVI
  • In other cases, local customs have been deliberately adapted and imbued with Christian meaning in an effort to keep the Church incarnate and accessible to local Christians.
    Great Apostasy - Wikipedia  --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Apostasy (retrieved 05/20/06)
  • It is unlikely for one of us to see the other again in this incarnation.
    Hermann Hesse  --  Siddhartha
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • The mad boy in his new incarnation was not the only threat they faced.
    Dean Koontz  --  Sole Survivor
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Even far away, he looked like purity incarnate.
    Dan Brown  --  Angels & Demons

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