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expiate

used in a sentence
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Definition atone (demonstrate sorrow for a wrong either by doing something good to make up for the wrong, or accepting punishment)
  • She knows she can't expiate her sins, but hopes to heal some of the wounds.
expiate = make up for (do enough good to make up for the wrongs)
  • this dear, sainted old man, who had years ago expiated, in his whole manhood's life, the madness of a boys treason?
    Edward E. Hale  --  The Man Without a Country
  • expiated = atoned (demonstrated sorrow for a wrong either by doing something good in return for the wrong, or by accepting punishment)
  • And she said, "My daily life is an acknowledgment and expiation of my sin"
    William Faulkner  --  As I Lay Dying
  • expiation = atonement (a way of demonstrating sorrow for a wrong either by doing something good in return for the wrong, or by accepting punishment)
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • And when there is also a feeling of guilt to be overcome, and, maybe, expiated,
    John Wyndham  --  The Chrysalids
  • expiated = atoned (paid for either by doing something good in return for a wrong, or by accepting punishment)
  • It was a sort of expiation, the only way I could make myself feel like I had paid for the sin of ever having joined the Circle, of having trusted Valentine.
    Cassandra Clare  --  City of Glass
  • expiation = atonement (a way of demonstrating sorrow for a wrong either by doing something good in return for the wrong, or by accepting punishment)
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Two years earlier, a Quaker professor ... driven, apparently, by deep urges for expiation and reconciliation, had come to Hiroshima, assembled a team of carpenters, and, with his own hands and theirs, begun building a series of Japanese-style houses for victims of the bomb;
    John Hersey  --  Hiroshima
  • expiation = the desire to do something good to try to make up for a wrong
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Suffer and expiate your sin by it, that's what you must do.
    Dostoyevsky, Fyodor  --  Crime And Punishment
  • I do not wish to expiate, but to live.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo  --  Essays, First Series
  • But, in order to expiate the sin of avarice, which was my undoing, I oblige each passer-by to give me a blow.
    Lang, Andrew  --  The Arabian Nights
  • Be that as it may, if our good senator was a political sinner, he was in a fair way to expiate it by his night's penance.
    Stowe, Harriet Beecher  --  Uncle Tom's Cabin
  • After a wild youth, he had retired into a convent, there to expiate, at least for some time, the follies of adolescence.
    Dumas, Alexandre  --  The Three Musketeers
  • I don't see myself—or you either— offering ourselves up to expiate her crimes.
    Wharton, Edith  --  The Age of Innocence
  • ...offences to expiate and peace to make, does not justify the desire to forget.
    Dickens, Charles  --  Little Dorrit
  • Of what crime could she be guilty that she must expiate it in the dreaded arena?
    Burroughs, Edgar Rice  --  Pellucidar
  • I am going out to expiate a great wrong, Paul.
    Burroughs, Edgar Rice  --  The Return of Tarzan
  • I have many sins to expiate, and though I be deathless, life is all too short for the atonement.
    Burroughs, Edgar Rice  --  Warlord of Mars
  • I am to blame, and punish me, make me expiate my fault.
    Tolstoy, Leo  --  Anna Karenina
  • Tereza was ashamed of having been suspicious of Tomas, and hoped to expiate her guilt with a rush of benevolence towards his son.
    Milan Kundera  --  The Unbearable Lightness of Being
  • "Aren't you half expiating your crime by facing the suffering?" she cried, holding him close and kissing him.
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky  --  Crime and Punishment
  • Not unto me the strength be ascribed; not unto me the wringing of the expiation!'
    Charles Dickens  --  Little Dorrit
(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)

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