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antipathy
used in a sentence

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Definition strong dislike
  • Cooperation is fueled by a shared antipathy toward Iran.
antipathy = strong dislike
  • She has an antipathy to practical concerns.
  • antipathy = strong dislike
  • The only famous painter of the past for whom I have entertained an antipathy, is Raphael; yet, when I was in Rome and saw the frescos in the Vatican, I was obliged again to ask myself if my attitude was a pose, because they struck me frankly as admirable.
    Pío Baroja  --  Youth and Egolatry
  • John had not much affection for his mother and sisters, and an antipathy to me.
    Bronte, Charlotte  --  Jane Eyre
  • Antipathy in one nation against another disposes each more readily to offer insult and injury,
    George Washington  --  Washington's Farewell Address
  • antipathy = strong dislike
  • It was the sense of his helplessness that sharpened his antipathy.
    Edith Wharton  --  Ethan Frome
  • antipathy = strong dislike
  • I see something there I rarely see—frustration, antipathy.
    Kathryn Stockett  --  The Help
  • antipathy = strong dislike
  • In truth, his own antipathy to the veil was known to be so great, that he never willingly passed before a mirror, nor stooped to drink at a still fountain, lest, in its peaceful bosom, he should be affrighted by himself.
    Nathaniel Hawthorne  --  The Minister's Black Veil
  • antipathy = strong dislike
  • No contraries hold more antipathy Than I and such a knave.
    William Shakespeare  --  King Lear
  • antipathy = strong dislike
  • The lawyer and novelist Louis Auchincloss, who very much belongs to the old WASP-y white-shoe legal establishment in New York, has a scene in his book The Scarlet Letters that perfectly captures the antipathy the downtown firms felt toward takeover law.
    Malcolm Gladwell  --  Outliers
  • antipathy = strong dislike
  • He rated him as a first-class hand; and yet he felt a secret dislike to him,—the native antipathy of bad to good.
    Stowe, Harriet Beecher  --  Uncle Tom's Cabin
  • We know now, the natural antipathy you strove against, and conquered, for her dear sake.
    Dickens, Charles  --  A Tale Of Two Cities
  • He divined the fanatical love of freedom in her, the deep-seated antipathy for restraint of any sort.
    London, Jack  --  Adventure
  • Science can be introduced to children well or poorly. If poorly, children can be turned away from science; they can develop a lifelong antipathy; they will be in a far worse condition than if they had never been introduced to science at all.
    Isaac Asimov
  • Besides, there was his old antipathy to being touched.
    London, Jack  --  White Fang
  • "But I hope you will not carry your antipathy so far as to deprive me of the pleasure of your company, sir," said Monte Cristo.
    Dumas, Alexandre  --  The Count of Monte Cristo
  • A man who writes the life of Napoleon finds himself either sympathizing with him, or roused into antipathy by him.
    Timothy Titcomb  --  Lessons in Life
  • There is one antipathy, however, which I find it hard to overcome.
    Oppenheim, E. Phillips  --  The Malefactor
  • He, seized already with an instinctive antipathy to Trefusis, said emphatically:
    Shaw, George Bernard  --  An Unsocial Socialist
  • Only I have a strange antipathy to the place.
    Oppenheim, E. Phillips  --  The Vanished Messenger

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