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Andrew Johnson
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Andrew Johnson


Andrew Johnson was a strong pro-union southerner. He was the only southern Senator not to resign when the south seceded from the United States.
  17th President of the United States; succeeded Lincoln when Lincoln was assassinated; impeached but acquitted by one vote (1808-1875)
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  • Andrew Johnson was a strong pro-union southerner. He was the only southern Senator not to resign when the south seceded from the United States.
  • In Maine he is elected Governor by the largest majority in the history of the state and returned to office three times, where he alienates political friends by refusing to agree to the impeachment of Andrew Johnson.
    Michael Shaara  --  The Killer Angels
  • Is the respondent Andrew Johnson guilty or not guilty of a high misdemeanor as charged in this Article?
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • Andrew Johnson was born in 1808, Lyndon Johnson in 1908.
    Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Kennedy

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  • His new vice president, Andrew Johnson, has just delivered a red-faced, drunken, twenty-minute ramble vilifying the South that has left the crowd squirming, embarrassed by Johnson’s inebriation.
    Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Lincoln
  • I walked her to the Lincoln Memorial and lectured her on Abraham Lincoln, the Emancipation Proclamation, Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee, Stephen Douglas, Mary Todd, Andrew Johnson, John Wilkes Booth, Dr. Samuel Mudd, Edwin M. Stanton, Salmon P. Chase, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Simon Legree.
    Russell Baker  --  Growing Up
  • ] [Footnote d: See Appendix, N. [The impeachment of President Andrew Johnson in 1868—which was resorted to by his political opponents solely as a means of turning him out of office, for it could not be contended that he had been guilty of high crimes and misdemeanors, and he was in fact honorably acquitted and reinstated in office—is a striking confirmation of the truth of this remark.
    Alexis de Toqueville  --  Democracy In America, Volume 1
  • Vice President Andrew Johnson is an obvious target.
    Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Lincoln
  • Lincoln hopes for a certain pragmatic lenience toward the southern states, rather than a draconian punishment, as his vice president, Andrew Johnson, favors.
    Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Lincoln
  • Killing Vice President Andrew Johnson does not look to be a difficult task.
    Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Lincoln

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  • As stated by De Witt in his memorable Impeachment of Andrew Johnson, "The full brunt of the struggle turned at last on the one remaining doubtful Senator, Edmund G. Ross."
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • I could not close the story of Edmund Ross without some more adequate mention of those six courageous Republicans who stood with Ross and braved denunciation to acquit Andrew Johnson.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • He had made it clear that he was not in sympathy with Andrew Johnson personally or politically; and after the removal of Stanton, he had voted with the majority in adopting a resolution declaring such removal unlawful.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • Andrew Johnson, meanwhile, is behaving very much like a man waiting to be summoned.
    Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Lincoln
  • Andrew Johnson will not, however, suffer the far worse fate of death at the hand of an assassin.
    Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Lincoln
  • Vice President Andrew Johnson, whose luck held when his assassin backed out, now stands in the next room, summoned after learning of Lincoln’s plight.
    Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Lincoln
  • Vice President Andrew Johnson is sworn in as the seventeenth president of the United States.
    Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Lincoln
  • Out of respect for her mourning and instability, President Andrew Johnson will not have the platforms torn down until after she moves out, on May 22.
    Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Lincoln
  • Mary Surratt’s attorney frantically works to get an audience with President Andrew Johnson so that he might personally intervene on her behalf.
    Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Lincoln
  • Stanton clashed repeatedly with President Andrew Johnson over the process of Reconstruction.
    Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Lincoln
  • Few men could have successfully followed Abraham Lincoln as president, but Andrew Johnson proved particularly inept.
    Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Lincoln
  • Spangler, Mudd, and Arnold were pardoned in 1869 by Andrew Johnson and lived out their days as law-abiding citizens.
    Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Lincoln
  • The petition to spare Mary’s life never got to President Andrew Johnson; his assistant Preston King kept the information away from Johnson.
    Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Lincoln
  • Those in the North who sought to bind up the wounds of the nation and treat the South with mercy and fairness—men like President Andrew Johnson, and those Senators who stood by him in his impeachment—were pilloried for their lack of patriotism by those who waved the "bloody shirt."
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • As the Union began to crack in 1860, Benton and Houston were gone from the Senate floor, and only Andrew Johnson, alone among the Southerners, spoke for Union.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • Among the acquaintances and colleagues who march across the pages of his diary are Sam Adams (a kinsman), John Hancock, Washington, Jefferson, Franklin, Lafayette, John Jay, James Madison, James Monroe, John Marshall, Henry Clay, Andrew Jackson, Thomas Hart Benton, John Tyler, John C. Calhoun, Daniel Webster, Lincoln, James Buchanan, William Lloyd Garrison, Andrew Johnson, Jefferson Davis and many others.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • Even as he sleeps off his long, hard night of drinking and walking, detectives sent to protect Andrew Johnson are combing through Atzerodt’s belongings at Kirkwood House.
    Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Lincoln
  • Andrew Johnson, the courageous if untactful Tennessean who had been the only Southern Member of Congress to refuse to secede with his state, had committed himself to the policies of the Great Emancipator to whose high station he had succeeded only by the course of an assassin’s bullet.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • If a more elaborate assassination plot were hatched, one that killed Vice President Andrew Johnson and Secretary of State William Seward along with President Lincoln, a skilled constitutional scholar like Edwin Stanton could attempt to manipulate the process in his favor—and perhaps even become president.
    Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Lincoln
  • Oblivious to the threat of death, Andrew Johnson toured the state, attempting in vain to stem the tide against secession, and finally becoming the only Southern Sen-ator who refused to secede with his state.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • As John Wilkes Booth tiptoes into the state box and Lewis Powell knocks on William Seward’s front door, George Atzerodt, the would-be assassin of Vice President Andrew Johnson, is drinking hard, late for his date with destiny.
    Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Lincoln
  • SENATOR WILLIAM PITT FESSENDEN of Maine, in a eulogy delivered upon the death of Senator Foot of Vermont in 1866, two years before Senator Fessenden’s vote to acquit Andrew Johnson brought about the fulfillment of his own prophecy.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • But not all of Andrew Johnson’s vetoes were overturned; and the "Radical" Republicans of the Congress promptly realized that one final step was necessary before they could crush their despised foe (and in the heat of political battle their vengeance was turned upon their President far more than their former military enemies of the South).
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • It would practically have revolutionized our splendid political fabric into a partisan Congressional autocracy…… This government had never faced so insidious a danger …. control by the worst element of American politics…… If Andrew Johnson were acquitted by a nonpartisan vote …. America would pass the danger point of partisan rule and that intolerance which so often characterizes the sway of great majorities and makes them dangerous.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • The impeachment of President Andrew Johnson, the event in which the obscure Ross was to play such a dramatic role, was the sensational climax to the bitter struggle between the President, determined to carry out Abraham Lincoln’s policies of reconciliation with the defeated South, and the more radical Republican leaders in Congress, who sought to administer the downtrodden Southern states as conquered provinces which had forfeited their rights under the Constitution.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • In those troubled days before the Civil War, great courage in opposing sectional pressures—greater perhaps even than that of Webster, Benton and Houston—was demonstrated by Senator Andrew Johnson of Tennessee, the bold if tactless fighter who in 1868 was saved from a humiliating ouster from the White House by the single vote of the hapless Edmund Ross.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • But Lyman Trumbull, ending a brilliant career of public service and devotion to the party which would renounce him, filed for the record these enduring words: The question to be decided is not whether Andrew Johnson is a proper person to fill the Presidential office, nor whether it is fit that he should remain in it…… Once set, the example of impeaching a President for what, when the excitement of the House shall have subsided, will be regarded as insufficient cause, no future…
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
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Associated words [difficulty]:   Andrew Johnson [5] , Abraham Lincoln [3] , Harry S. Truman [3] , William Howard Taft [4] , Theodore Roosevelt [5] , Calvin Coolidge [6] , Herbert Hoover [6] , Woodrow Wilson [6] , Warren G. Harding [7] , William McKinley [9]
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