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Buffalo Bill
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Buffalo Bill


Although best remembered as a showman, in his early days Buffalo Bill was also awarded the Medal of Honor for "gallantry in action" while serving as a civilian scout in the Indian Wars. He later said, "Every Indian outbreak that I have ever known has resulted from broken promises and broken treaties by the government."
  U.S. showman famous for his Wild West Show (1846-1917)
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Buffalo Bill William F. Cody
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  • Although best remembered as a showman, in his early days Buffalo Bill was also awarded the Medal of Honor for "gallantry in action" while serving as a civilian scout in the Indian Wars. He later said, "Every Indian outbreak that I have ever known has resulted from broken promises and broken treaties by the government."
  • He thought I was some kind of cross between Billy the Kid and Buffalo Bill, quick on the draw and Dang mah breeches!
    Marcus Luttrell  --  Lone Survivor
  • It wasn’t quite 10 p.m. when we pulled into the town of about twenty-four thousand, whose greatest claim to fame is that it was the hometown of the famous Wild West showman, Buffalo Bill Cody.
    Todd Burpo  --  Heaven Is for Real
  • Egg two evidently demolished, he nodded and winked, adding bloodthirstily: —Buffalo Bill shoots to kill, Never missed nor he never will.
    James Joyce  --  Ulysses

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  • We’re making Buffalo Bill’s show look like magic-lantern views of Palestine in the town hall.
    O. Henry  --  The Ransom of Red Chief
  • He was still an old galliard, with white Buffalo Bill vandyke, and he swanked around, still healthy and fleshy, in white suits, looking things over with big sex-amused eyes.
    Saul Bellow  --  The Adventures of Augie March
  • In his time he would become far better known for his battles on America’s western frontier and for his friendships with other larger-than-life figures, such as Buffalo Bill Cody.
    Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Lincoln
  • One was Colonel Jones, a noted plainsman, who in the near future was to earn the sobriquet "Buffalo Jones," not like his contemporary, Buffalo Bill, for destroying buffalo, but for preserving calves to form the nucleus of a herd.
    Zane Grey  --  The Thundering Herd
  • A train with a more lighthearted cargo also headed for Chicago, this one leased by Buffalo Bill for his Wild West show.
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • …intricate web, from Max Isaacs, from "Nosey" Schmidt, the butcher’s son, who had all the rich adventures of the Rover Boys; he ransacked Gant’s shelves at home, reading translations of the Iliad and the Odyssey at the same time as Diamond Dick, Buffalo Bill, and the Algers, and for the same reason; then, as the first years waned and the erotic gropings became more intelligible, he turned passionately to all romantic legendry, looking for women in whom blood ran hotly, whose breath was…
    Thomas Wolfe  --  Look Homeward, Angel

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  • He was dressed in fringed buckskin, in imitation of a very old style; he wore a Bill Cody beard and rather long hair.
    Robert A. Heinlein  --  Tunnel In the Sky
  • The mirrors had been covered by Mrs. Einhorn, in whom superstition was very strong, and a candle burned down in a pale white ecclesiastical glass in the dark dining room by a photo of the Commissioner taken when his Bill Cody whiskers were still full and glossy.
    Saul Bellow  --  The Adventures of Augie March
  • His old sire, gruff and mocking, deeply tickled, lay like the Buffalo Bill of the Etruscans in the beach chair and bath towel drawn up burnoose-wise to keep the dazzle from his eyes—additionally shaded by his soft, flesh-heavy arm—his bushy mouth open with laughter.
    Saul Bellow  --  The Adventures of Augie March
  • Buffalo Bill always began his show with his Cowboy Band playing "The Star-Spangled Banner."
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • Another of the show’s staples was an Indian attack on an old stagecoach, the Deadwood Mail Coach, with Buffalo Bill and his men coming to the rescue.
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • A tall man in a huge white hat and a white buckskin coat heavily trimmed in silver stood a full head above the men around him: Buffalo Bill.
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • As the fair fought for attendance, Buffalo Bill’s Wild West drew crowds by the tens of thousands.
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • To the right, in the smoky distance, the president saw the banners of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West flying over the arena Colonel Cody had built at Sixty-second Street.
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • Buffalo Bill drove.
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • Buffalo Bill, resplendent in white buckskin and silver, was there to greet him, along with the rest of the Wild West company and ten thousand or so residents of Chicago.
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • Never before had so many of history’s brightest lights, including Buffalo Bill, Theodore Dreiser, Susan B. Anthony, Jane Addams, Clarence Darrow, George Westinghouse, Thomas Edison, Henry Adams, Archduke Francis Ferdinand, Nikola Tesla, Ignace Paderewski, Philip Armour, and Marshall Field, gathered in one place at one time.
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • Colonel William Cody—Buffalo Bill—sought a concession for his Wild West show, newly returned from a hugely successful tour of Europe, but the fair’s Committee on Ways and Means turned him down on grounds of "incongruity."
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • Buffalo Bill’s Wild West may indeed have been an "incongruity," as the directors had declared in rejecting his request for a concession within Jackson Park, but the citizens of Chicago had fallen in love.
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • Visitors entered through a gate that featured Columbus on one side, under the banner "PILOT OF THE OCEAN, THE FIRST PIONEER," and Buffalo Bill on the other, identified as "PILOT OF THE PRAIRIE, THE LAST PIONEER."
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • There was disarray in the fairgrounds, but not next door on the fifteen acres of ground leased by Buffalo Bill for his show, which now bore the official title "Buffalo Bill’s Wild West and Congress of Rough Riders of the World."
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • There was disarray in the fairgrounds, but not next door on the fifteen acres of ground leased by Buffalo Bill for his show, which now bore the official title "Buffalo Bill’s Wild West and Congress of Rough Riders of the World."
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • Buffalo Bill promptly declared Waif’s Day at the Wild West and offered any kid in Chicago a free train ticket, free admission to the show, and free access to the whole Wild West encampment, plus all the candy and ice cream the children could eat.
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • Just before the train entered the fairgrounds, it passed the arena of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West.
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • Dreiser joined the teachers on the Ferris Wheel and accompanied them on a visit to Buffalo Bill’s show, where Colonel Cody himself greeted the women and shook hands with each.
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • The climax of the show was the "Attack on a Settler’s Cabin," during which Indians who once had slaughtered soldiers and civilians alike staged a mock attack on a cabin full of white settlers, only to be vanquished yet again by Buffalo Bill and a company of cowboys firing blanks.
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • Meanwhile, according to the Tribune, Indians recruited from Buffalo Bill’s show and from various fair exhibits would "peer cautiously" at the landing party while shouting incoherently and running "to and fro."
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • A single ticket-seller, L. E. Decker, a nephew of Buffalo Bill who had sold tickets for Bill’s Wild West for eight years, sold 17,843 tickets during his shift, the most by any one man, and won Horace Tucker’s prize of a box of cigars.
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • Indians who had once used hatchets to bare the skulls of white men drifted over from Buffalo Bill’s compound, as did Annie Oakley and assorted Cossacks, Hussars, Lancers, and members of the U.S. Sixth Cavalry on temporary furlough to become actors in Colonel Cody’s show.
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • The fair made Buffalo Bill a million dollars (about $30 million today), which he used to found the town of Cody, Wyoming, build a cemetery and fairground for North Platte, Nebraska, pay the debts of five North Platte churches, acquire a Wisconsin newspaper, and further the theatrical fortunes of a lovely young actress named Katherine Clemmons, thereby deepening the already pronounced alienation of his wife.
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • ) Deploying the most shocking analogy he could muster, the clergyman asked Anthony if she’d prefer having a son of hers attend Buffalo Bill’s show on Sunday instead of church.
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
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