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as in:  the play

It’s Pygmalion.
Jojo Moyes  --  Me Before You
  play by George Bernard Shaw in which a man refines a woman’s speech and falls in love with the woman "he created" (1913)
 Mark word for later review on this computer
Strongly Associated with:   George Bernard Shaw, My Fair Lady
In the myth, Aphrodite turns the statue into a woman.

The play was further popularized by the musical, "My Fair Lady".

Accelerated Reader Level/Points:  7* / 6

* Although the sentences are easy to read; the London setting, archaic words, and accented speech lead this editor to think that the average 7th grader would find the book too difficult.
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  • It’s Pygmalion.
    Jojo Moyes  --  Me Before You
  • This is the secret of her birth: a Gothic Pygmalion, who was making gargoyles for cathedrals, fell in love with one of them, the most horrible, one fine morning.
    Victor Hugo  --  Les Miserables
  • Suppose she did Pygmalion and Galatea what would she say first?
    James Joyce  --  Ulysses
  • Even Pygmalion, when his sculptured woman assumed life, felt not greater ecstasy than mine will be.
    Nathaniel Hawthorne  --  The Birthmark

  • Show more
  • What was the name of Pygmalion’s sister?
    Sarah Dessen  --  Dreamland
  • Now as he sat among the guitarists and watched this awkward girl singing ballads, imitating every inflection of the more experienced singers who had preceded her, the determination entered his mind to play Pygmalion.
    Thornton Wilder  --  The Bridge of San Luis Rey
  • What, is there none of Pygmalion’s images, newly made woman, to be had now, for putting the hand in the pocket and extracting it clutched?
    William Shakespeare  --  Measure for Measure
  • So Pygmalion created his Galatea, and the first contract you accepted became Aphrodite and gave it life.
    Robert Ludlum  --  The Bourne Supremacy
  • The story of Pygmalion and his statue is as natural as it is poetical.
    Lew Wallace  --  Ben Hur
  • Pygmalion came next.
    Michael Lewis  --  The Blind Side

  • Show more again
  • Her father gave her, yet a spotless maid; Pygmalion then the Tyrian scepter sway’d: One who condemn’d divine and human laws.
    Virgil  --  The Aeneid
  • The sensation produced in London when George Bernard Shaw put it into the mouth of a woman character in his play, "Pygmalion," will be remembered.
    Henry L. Mencken  --  The American Language
  • "It’s Shaw’s Pygmalion," George explained, and told me the plot: two elegant gentlemen taking an ignorant girl off the streets, filling her with learning, brushing her to a high polish.
    Russell Baker  --  Growing Up
  • As will be seen later on, Pygmalion needs, not a preface, but a sequel, which I have supplied in its due place.
    George Bernard Shaw  --  Pygmalion
  • Pygmalion? not though he aye forge and beat, Or grave or painte: for I dare well sayn, Apelles, Zeuxis, shoulde work in vain, Either to grave, or paint, or forge, or beat, If they presumed me to counterfeit.
    Geoffrey Chaucer  --  The Canterbury Tales
  • They seize a fleet, which ready rigg’d they find; Nor is Pygmalion’s treasure left behind.
    Virgil  --  The Aeneid
    George Bernard Shaw  --  Pygmalion
  • Must I attend Pygmalion’s cruelty, Or till Hyarba shall in triumph lead A queen that proudly scorn’d his proffer’d bed?
    Virgil  --  The Aeneid
  • I wish to boast that Pygmalion has been an extremely successful play all over Europe and North America as well as at home.
    George Bernard Shaw  --  Pygmalion
  • A lofty city by my hands is rais’d, Pygmalion punish’d, and my lord appeas’d.
    Virgil  --  The Aeneid
  • Pygmalion Higgins is not a portrait of Sweet, to whom the adventure of Eliza Doolittle would have been impossible; still, as will be seen, there are touches of Sweet in the play.
    George Bernard Shaw  --  Pygmalion
  • PYGMALION BERNARD SHAW 1912 TRANSCRIBER’S NOTE: In the printed version of this text, all apostrophes for contractions such as "can’t", "wouldn’t" and "he’d" were omitted, to read as "cant", "wouldnt", and "hed".
    George Bernard Shaw  --  Pygmalion
  • Pygmalion.
    Jojo Moyes  --  Me Before You
  • This little spot of land, which Heav’n bestows, On ev’ry side is hemm’d with warlike foes; Gaetulian cities here are spread around, And fierce Numidians there your frontiers bound; Here lies a barren waste of thirsty land, And there the Syrtes raise the moving sand; Barcaean troops besiege the narrow shore, And from the sea Pygmalion threatens more.
    Virgil  --  The Aeneid
  • Galatea never does quite like Pygmalion: his relation to her is too godlike to be altogether agreeable.
    George Bernard Shaw  --  Pygmalion
  • Put that along with her resentment of Higgins’s domineering superiority, and her mistrust of his coaxing cleverness in getting round her and evading her wrath when he had gone too far with his impetuous bullying, and you will see that Eliza’s instinct had good grounds for warning her not to marry her Pygmalion.
    George Bernard Shaw  --  Pygmalion
  • Your Pygmalion, old chap] … Now, hear me, and hear me well.
    Robert Ludlum  --  The Bourne Supremacy
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Associated words [difficulty]:   Pygmalion [8] , George Bernard Shaw [7] , My Fair Lady [8] , Jane Eyre [4] , Heart of Darkness [5] , Moby-Dick [5] , Pride and Prejudice [5] , Robinson Crusoe [6] , The Catcher in the Rye [6] , The Count of Monte Cristo [6] , The Three Musketeers [6] , Anna Karenina [7] , Doctor Zhivago [7] , Great Expectations [7] , Gulliver’s Travels [7] , Little Women [7] , Lolita (the novel) [7] , Middlemarch [7] , Paradise Lost [7] , The Grapes of Wrath [7] , The Joy Luck Club [7] , A Tale of Two Cities [8] , Adventures of Huckleberry Finn [8] , Crime and Punishment [8] , Les Misérables [8] , Lord of the Flies [8] , Madame Bovary [8] , Mrs. Dalloway [8] , Of Mice and Men [8] , Rip Van Winkle [8] , Sense and Sensibility [8] , Slaughterhouse-Five [8] , The Brothers Karamazov [8] , The Color Purple [8] , The Great Gatsby [8] , The Hunchback of Notre Dame [8] , The Last of the Mohicans [8] , The Metamorphosis [8] , The Old Man and the Sea [8] , The Scarlet Letter [8] , Uncle Tom’s Cabin [8] , Wuthering Heights [8] , Animal Farm [9] , Bleak House [9] , Canterbury Tales [9] , One Hundred Years of Solitude [9] , The Adventures of Tom Sawyer [9] , The Call of the Wild [9] , The Sound and the Fury [9] , The Sun Also Rises [9] , The War of the Worlds [9]
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