To see details on the word
John Jay
please enable javascript.

John Jay


John Jay habitually purchased slaves and freed them when they were adults and the work had paid for their purchase.
  U.S. diplomat and jurist who helped lead the American Revolution, helped author the Federalist Papers, and served as the first chief justice of the United States Supreme Court (1745-1829)
Home
 Mark word for later review on this computer
Notes:
Jay also negotiated peace treaties with Britain, France, and Spain. As governor of New York, he was the leading opponent of slavery and signed legislation to emancipate the slaves of that state.
Web Links:
(try right-click if popups are disabled)
Dictionary - Vocabulary.com®
Dictionary/Synonyms - Google®
Dictionary List - OneLook®
Wikipedia Article
Samples:
  • John Jay habitually purchased slaves and freed them when they were adults and the work had paid for their purchase.
  • All gently yet, the hands urged him on,—the hands of young John Jay, that daring father’s daring son; the hands of the good folk of Boston, that free city.
    W. E. B. Du Bois  --  The Souls of Black Folk
  • Among the acquaintances and colleagues who march across the pages of his diary are Sam Adams (a kinsman), John Hancock, Washington, Jefferson, Franklin, Lafayette, John Jay, James Madison, James Monroe, John Marshall, Henry Clay, Andrew Jackson, Thomas Hart Benton, John Tyler, John C. Calhoun, Daniel Webster, Lincoln, James Buchanan, William Lloyd Garrison, Andrew Johnson, Jefferson Davis and many others.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • No sooner was Jefferson named by Congress, in May 1784, to replace John Jay at Paris, than he was ready to go.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams

  • Show more
  • When the bill which has since become the Constitution of the United States was submitted to the approval of the people, and the discussions were still pending, three men, who had already acquired a portion of that celebrity which they have since enjoyed—John Jay, Hamilton, and Madison—formed an association with the intention of explaining to the nation the advantages of the measure which was proposed.
    Alexis de Toqueville  --  Democracy In America, Volume 1
  • "The King listened to every word I said, with dignity but with apparent emotion," Adams would report to Foreign Secretary John Jay.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • From Philadelphia, John Jay sent instructions to negotiate with the Barbary States.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • Compared to such demands, the sum Congress had authorized them to spend was, as they reported to John Jay, "but a drop in the bucket."
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • To John Jay he would claim it to be the first bearing of fruit of the American Revolution in Europe.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • Within weeks after the first copies of his Defence were ready at the printer, he had written to John Jay to ask that he be recalled.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams

  • Show more again
  • His accommodations with John Jay were the finest possible, and occasional Sundays with Nabby and her family helped greatly.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • John Jay of New York, the American minister to Spain, had been in Madrid for a year, and his mission had proven hopeless, as the Spanish Court had no interest in recognizing the independence of the United States.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • A troop of New York cavalry and a "numerous concourse of citizens" led by John Jay and several members of Congress were waiting to escort him south to the city and Jay’s palatial home on Broadway.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • IN LATE SEPTEMBER, John Jay dispatched an urgent note to John Adams from Paris to report that the British emissary Richard Oswald had received a formal commission to treat with the United States on the matter of peace.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • Instead, he was to be one of five commissioners, each representing a major section of the country—Adams for New England, Franklin for Pennsylvania, John Jay for New York, Jefferson for Virginia, and Henry Laurens for the Deep South.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • Much had already transpired, as Adams learned from meetings with John Jay and a young American merchant named Matthew Ridley, whom Adams had met earlier in Holland and who, though he had no official role, seemed to know all that was going on.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • To replace him Adams first turned to his old friend John Jay, but when Jay declined, he chose John Marshall.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • The threat of embroilment in the European war continued, America at the "precipice," as Adams said, and still there was no word from John Jay in London.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • The President, he reported to Jefferson, was sending Chief Justice John Jay as a special envoy to London to "find a way to reconcile our honor with peace."
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • While Jefferson would have much to say about the Constitution and the need for a bill of rights in subsequent private correspondence with Madison, he made no public statement for the time being, whereas Adams sent off a strong endorsement to John Jay that was to be widely quoted at home.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • But when his American doctor, James Jay, the brother of John Jay, had suggested a sojourn in England, he had gone off to London with John Quincy and later to Bath, to take the waters, an experience Adams had found little to his liking and that was cut short by a summons to return to Holland to secure still another desperately needed loan.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • ) For Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, Washington chose John Jay.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
Search for samples from other sources:
(try right-click if popups are disabled)
Interest -- Source
General -- Google News®
General -- Time® Magazine
General -- Twitter®
Associated words [difficulty]:   John Jay [7] , Robert F. Kennedy [6] , Newt Gingrich [8] , Eugene Debs [9] , Joseph McCarthy [9] , William Jennings Bryan [9]
     If popups are enabled: Search in OneLook®   If Flash® is also enabled: Search in Visuwords®
Most commonly used in these subjects:   History, Public Policy & Politics, Law
Home
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading