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George Eliot
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George Eliot


George Eliot said she used the male pen name so her works would be taken seriously.
  British writer of novels characterized by realistic analysis of provincial Victorian society and psychology (1819-1880)
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George Eliot Mary Ann Evans
Strongly Associated with:   Middlemarch
Notes:
George Eliot was the pen name for Mary Ann Evans.
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Samples:
  • George Eliot said she used the male pen name so her works would be taken seriously.
  • Many authors consider George Eliot’s Middlemarch to be among the best books ever written.
  • GEORGE ELIOT, Middlemarch, lxxvi.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson  --  Selected Essays
  • SILAS MARNER The Weaver of Raveloe by George Eliot (Mary Anne Evans) 1861 "A child, more than all other gifts That earth can offer to declining man, Brings hope with it, and forward-looking thoughts."
    George Eliot  --  Silas Marner

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  • The Mill on the Floss George Eliot Chapter I Outside Dorlcote Mill A wide plain, where the broadening Floss hurries on between its green banks to the sea, and the loving tide, rushing to meet it, checks its passage with an impetuous embrace.
    George Eliot  --  The Mill on the Floss
  • She liked Thackeray’s ladies better than Dickens’s, and George Eliot’s best of all—but it was a frustration that the mail came so seldom.
    Larry McMurtry  --  Lonesome Dove
  • George Eliot has admirably noted it—"In these frail vessels is borne onward through the ages the treasure of human affection."
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volumes 1 & 2
  • She listened respectably to statistics on Dickens, Thackeray, Jane Austen, George Eliot, Scott, Hardy, Lamb, De Quincey, and Mrs. Humphry Ward, who, it seemed, constituted the writers of English Fiction and Essays.
    Sinclair Lewis  --  Main Street
  • She was by way of being terrified of him—he was so fearfully clever, and the first night when she had sat by him, and he talked about George Eliot, she had been really frightened, for she had left the third volume of MIDDLEMARCH in the train and she never knew what happened in the end; but afterwards she got on perfectly, and made herself out even more ignorant than she was, because he liked telling her she was a fool.
    Virginia Woolf  --  To the Lighthouse
  • Mistaking his urgency for a shared love of George Eliot, Miss Boon quickly found her place.
    Henry H. Neff  --  The Maelstrom

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  • George Eliot has admirably noted it—"In these frail vessels is borne onward through the ages the treasure of human affection."
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volume 1
  • Currer Bell, George Eliot, George Sand, all the victims of inner strife as their writings prove, sought ineffectively to veil themselves by using the name of a man.
    Virginia Woolf  --  A Room of One’s Own
  • ADAM BEDE by George Eliot Book One Chapter I The Workshop With a single drop of ink for a mirror, the Egyptian sorcerer undertakes to reveal to any chance comer far-reaching visions of the past.
    George Eliot  --  Adam Bede
  • Between them hang an engraved portrait of Richard Cobden; enlarged photographs of Martineau, Huxley, and George Eliot; autotypes of allegories by Mr G.F. Watts (for Roebuck believed in the fine arts with all the earnestness of a man who does not understand them), and an impression of Dupont’s engraving of Delaroche’s Beaux Artes hemicycle, representing the great men of all ages.
    George Bernard Shaw  --  Man And Superman
  • One of them, it is true, George Eliot, escaped after much tribulation, but only to a secluded villa in St John’s Wood.
    Virginia Woolf  --  A Room of One’s Own
  • George Eliot committed atrocities with it that beggar description.
    Virginia Woolf  --  A Room of One’s Own
  • The frail vessel, that charged with George Eliot’s "treasure," and thereby of such importance to those who curiously approach it, has likewise possibilities of importance to itself, possibilities which permit of treatment and in fact peculiarly require it from the moment they are considered at all.
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volume 1
  • The frail vessel, that charged with George Eliot’s "treasure," and thereby of such importance to those who curiously approach it, has likewise possibilities of importance to itself, possibilities which permit of treatment and in fact peculiarly require it from the moment they are considered at all.
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volumes 1 & 2
  • Jane Austen should have laid a wreath upon the grave of Fanny Burney, and George Eliot done homage to the robust shade of Eliza Carter—the valiant old woman who tied a bell to her bedstead in order that she might wake early and learn Greek.
    Virginia Woolf  --  A Room of One’s Own
  • She had had everything a girl could have: kindness, admiration, bonbons, bouquets, the sense of exclusion from none of the privileges of the world she lived in, abundant opportunity for dancing, plenty of new dresses, the London Spectator, the latest publications, the music of Gounod, the poetry of Browning, the prose of George Eliot.
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volume 1
  • She had had everything a girl could have: kindness, admiration, bonbons, bouquets, the sense of exclusion from none of the privileges of the world she lived in, abundant opportunity for dancing, plenty of new dresses, the London Spectator, the latest publications, the music of Gounod, the poetry of Browning, the prose of George Eliot.
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volumes 1 & 2
  • In the first month of this period George Eliot passed away, in the ensuing February Carlyle followed; in April Lord Beaconsfield died, deplored by his party, nor unregretted by his country; in February of the following year Longfellow was carried to the tomb; in April Rossetti was laid to rest by the sea, and the pavement of Westminster Abbey was disturbed to receive the dust of Darwin.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson  --  Selected Essays
  • Reading stories by all the women, not only George Eliot, but Mrs. Gore and Mrs. Gaskell and Charlotte Yonge, she sometimes had a longing to do what those women did—write stories.
    Larry McMurtry  --  Lonesome Dove
  • It may be answered meanwhile, in regard to Shakespeare’s and to George Eliot’s testimony, that their concession to the "importance" of their Juliets and Cleopatras and Portias (even with Portia as the very type and model of the young person intelligent and presumptuous) and to that of their Hettys and Maggies and Rosamonds and Gwendolens, suffers the abatement that these slimnesses are, when figuring as the main props of the theme, never suffered to be sole ministers of its appeal, but…
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volume 1
  • It may be answered meanwhile, in regard to Shakespeare’s and to George Eliot’s testimony, that their concession to the "importance" of their Juliets and Cleopatras and Portias (even with Portia as the very type and model of the young person intelligent and presumptuous) and to that of their Hettys and Maggies and Rosamonds and Gwendolens, suffers the abatement that these slimnesses are, when figuring as the main props of the theme, never suffered to be sole ministers of its appeal, but…
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volumes 1 & 2
  • ) It is an example exactly of the deep difficulty braved—the difficulty of making George Eliot’s "frail vessel," if not the all-in-all for our attention, at least the clearest of the call.
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volume 1
  • ) It is an example exactly of the deep difficulty braved—the difficulty of making George Eliot’s "frail vessel," if not the all-in-all for our attention, at least the clearest of the call.
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volumes 1 & 2
  • Moreover, I thought, looking at the four famous names, what had George Eliot in common with Emily Brontė?
    Virginia Woolf  --  A Room of One’s Own
  • They might mean simply a few remarks about Fanny Burney; a few more about Jane Austen; a tribute to the Brontės and a sketch of Haworth Parsonage under snow; some witticisms if possible about Miss Mitford; a respectful allusion to George Eliot; a reference to Mrs Gaskell and one would have done.
    Virginia Woolf  --  A Room of One’s Own
  • Emily Brontė should have written poetic plays; the overflow of George Eliot’s capacious mind should have spread itself when the creative impulse was spent upon history or biography.
    Virginia Woolf  --  A Room of One’s Own
  • Without those forerunners, Jane Austen and the Brontės and George Eliot could no more have written than Shakespeare could have written without Marlowe, or Marlowe without Chaucer, or Chaucer without those forgotten poets who paved the ways and tamed the natural savagery of the tongue.
    Virginia Woolf  --  A Room of One’s Own
  • She had nothing like the love of Nature, the fiery imagination, the wild poetry, the brilliant wit, the brooding wisdom of her great predecessors, Lady Winchilsea, Charlotte Brontė, Emily Brontė, Jane Austen and George Eliot; she could not write with the melody and the dignity of Dorothy Osborne—indeed she was no more than a clever girl whose books will no doubt be pulped by the publishers in ten years’ time.
    Virginia Woolf  --  A Room of One’s Own
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Associated words [difficulty]:   George Eliot [7] , Middlemarch [7] , Virginia Woolf [4] , Jane Austen [5] , Charles Dickens [6] , D.H. Lawrence [6] , Charlotte Brontė [7] , Emily Brontė [7] , George Bernard Shaw [7] , Oscar Wilde [7] , Thomas Hardy [7] , C.S. Lewis [8] , Daniel Defoe [8] , E.M. Forster [8] , George Orwell [8] , Graham Greene [8] , Rudyard Kipling [8]
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