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David Copperfield
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David Copperfield
as in:  the novel


In mid-November, they’d driven to the RBC Center in Raleigh to see David Copperfield perform onstage.
Nicholas Sparks  --  The Choice
  Charles Dickens most autobiographical novel depicting the inhuman treatment of children in 19th-century England; a lengthy, but popular novel filled with tragedy and comedy (1850)
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Strongly Associated with:   Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities, Bleak House, Great Expectations
Notes:
Often thought of as the prototypical lengthy, biographical novel. For example, in the TV sitcom, "Home Improvement", Brad attempts reading the book to impress a girl, but cannot overcome it’s length. The book title is also used as a reference to a biographical description of an unhappy childhood in the first sentence of Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye.  See the Wikipedia link for other references.

Flesch-Kincaid Readability Index: 8.6 (suitable for someone at standard reading level approaching or above 9th grade)

There is also a famous magician named David Copperfield.
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SparkNotes Contents
Samples:
  • In mid-November, they’d driven to the RBC Center in Raleigh to see David Copperfield perform onstage.
    Nicholas Sparks  --  The Choice
  • She’s already plowed through Oliver Twist and is deep into David Copperfield when Vivian squeaks.
    Christina Baker Kline  --  Orphan Train
  • Magic was stage shows with rabbits and doves and sometimes tigers, and David Copperfield sawing people in half and levitating over the audience.
    Micheal Scott  --  The Alchemyst
  • They’d read Ivanhoe together, taking turns, and then David Copperfield.
    David Guterson  --  Snow Falling on Cedars

  • Show more
  • If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you’ll probably want to know is where I was born, an what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but I don’t feel like going into it, if you want to know the truth.
    J.D. Salinger  --  The Catcher in the Rye
  • Would someone read to us from David Copperfield? I had misgivings.
    Don DeLillo  --  White Noise
  • Mrs. Nightwing sits in her chair, reading David Copperfield aloud to the younger girls.
    Libba Bray  --  A Great and Terrible Beauty
  • ’Yeah, right,’ she’d say under her breath as Heather Wainwright began a long analysis of the symbolism of poverty in David Copperfield.
    Sarah Dessen  --  Lock and Key
  • After class I curled up in a hammock strung between two cedar trees with a dog-eared copy of Dickens’s David Copperfield.
    Gloria Whelan  --  Listening for Lions
  • David Copperfield had a tough time and was apprenticed to Mr. Micawber who believed everything would turn out well.
    Dalton Trumbo  --  Johnny Got His Gun

  • Show more again
  • The comparison between Falstaff and Prospero is like the comparison between Micawber and David Copperfield.
    George Bernard Shaw  --  Man And Superman
  • And his name is DAVID COPPERFIELD.
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • I thought of David Copperfield working fourteen hours a day in a London factory.
    Gloria Whelan  --  Listening for Lions
  • 1869 THE PERSONAL HISTORY AND EXPERIENCE OF DAVID COPPERFIELD THE YOUNGER
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • David Copperfield, I think,’ said Miss Betsey; the emphasis referring, perhaps, to my mother’s mourning weeds, and her condition.
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • David Copperfield all over!’ cried Miss Betsey.
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • David Copperfield from head to foot!
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • David Copperfield,’ said Mrs. Creakle, leading me to a sofa, and sitting down beside me.
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • ’No, sir, David Copperfield,’ I said.
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • ’I am David Copperfield, of Blunderstone, in Suffolk — where you came, on the night when I was born, and saw my dear mama.
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • Dick,’ said my aunt, ’you have heard me mention David Copperfield?
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • David Copperfield?’ said Mr. Dick, who did not appear to me to remember much about it.
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • Now, here you see young David Copperfield, and the question I put to you is, what shall I do with him?’
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • She had seen David Copperfield out of the world, who was always running after wax dolls from his cradle.
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • ’You are the Mr. Murdstone who married the widow of my late nephew, David Copperfield, of Blunderstone Rookery!
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • I think I see David Copperfield looking forward to any condition of any sort or kind, though it stared him point-blank in the face!
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • She fades in her turn, and he fades, and all fades, and there is no flute, no Master, no Salem House, no David Copperfield, no anything but heavy sleep.
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • It was after breakfast, and we had been summoned in from the playground, when Mr. Sharp entered and said: ’David Copperfield is to go into the parlour.’
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • We’d been just about to start Wuthering Heights, a novel she’d promised would be a vast improvement over David Copperfield, which she’d dragged us through like a death march for the last few weeks.
    Sarah Dessen  --  Lock and Key
  • David Copperfield?
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • I’d known that morning I should probably toss everything out, but instead I’d just brought it all with me, even though it meant flipping past endless pages of notes on David Copperfield to take even more of the same.
    Sarah Dessen  --  Lock and Key
  • DAVID COPPERFIELD by CHARLES DICKENS PREFACE TO 1850 EDITION I do not find it easy to get sufficiently far away from this Book, in the first sensations of having finished it, to refer to it with the composure which this formal heading would seem to require.
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • Who wants to start us off on last night’s reading of David Copperfield?’Thirty minutes later, after what felt like some major literary d’j’-vu, the bell finally rang, everyone suddenly pushing back chairs, gathering up their stuff, and talking at once.
    Sarah Dessen  --  Lock and Key
  • David Copperfield,’ said Miss Murdstone, beckoning me aside into a window.
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • David Copperfield,’ said Miss Murdstone, ’I need not enlarge upon family circumstances.
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • ’I must confess to having entertained my suspicions of Miss Spenlow, in reference to David Copperfield, for some time.
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • I observed Miss Spenlow and David Copperfield, when they first met; and the impression made upon me then was not agreeable.
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • I have already said, sir, that I have had my suspicions of Miss Spenlow, in reference to David Copperfield, for some time.
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • After slogging my way through an extensive test on David Copperfield (ten IDs, two essays), all I wanted to do was collapse.
    Sarah Dessen  --  Lock and Key
  • I cannot close this Volume more agreeably to myself, than with a hopeful glance towards the time when I shall again put forth my two green leaves once a month, and with a faithful remembrance of the genial sun and showers that have fallen on these leaves of David Copperfield, and made me happy.
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • After perusing it, I taxed Miss Spenlow with having many such letters in her possession; and ultimately obtained from her the packet which is now in David Copperfield’s hand.’
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • Miss Murdstone shut her eyes, and disdainfully inclined her head; then, slowly opening her eyes, resumed: ’David Copperfield, I shall not attempt to disguise the fact, that I formed an unfavourable opinion of you in your childhood.
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • He preceded us to the dining-room — the first room I had entered in that house — and flinging open the door of Mr. Wickfield’s former office, said, in a sonorous voice: ’Miss Trotwood, Mr. David Copperfield, Mr. Thomas Traddles, and Mr. Dixon!’
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • I was looking back to the name of Doctor Mell, pleased to have discovered, in these happier circumstances, Mr. Mell, formerly poor pinched usher to my Middlesex magistrate, when Mr. Peggotty pointing to another part of the paper, my eyes rested on my own name, and I read thus: ’ TO DAVID COPPERFIELD, ESQUIRE, ’THE EMINENT AUTHOR.
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • There are the names, in the sweet old visionary connexion, David Copperfield and Dora Spenlow; and there, in the corner, is that Parental Institution, the Stamp Office, which is so benignantly interested in the various transactions of human life, looking down upon our Union; and there is the Archbishop of Canterbury invoking a blessing on us in print, and doing it as cheap as could possibly be expected.
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • "To make certain the afternoon is an educational one after all," Miss Moore says, glancing at Cecily, "I shall read aloud from David Copperfield.
    Libba Bray  --  A Great and Terrible Beauty
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Associated words [difficulty]:   David Copperfield [7] , Charles Dickens [6] , A Tale of Two Cities [8] , Bleak House [9] , Great Expectations [7] , Don Quixote de la Mancha [4] , Sherlock Holmes [4] , Henry James [6] , Samuel Johnson [6] , Ralph Waldo Emerson [7] , The Hound of the Baskervilles [7] , Candide [8] , Franz Kafka [8] , Rabindranath Tagore [9]
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