To see details on the word
Hesiod
please enable javascript.

Hesiod


It was in a time that predates Hesiod or Homer.
  Greek poet whose existing works describe rural life and the genealogies of the gods and the beginning of the world (eighth century BC)
Home
 Mark word for later review on this computer
Web Links:
(try right-click if popups are disabled)
Dictionary - Vocabulary.com®
Dictionary/Synonyms - Google®
Dictionary List - OneLook®
Wikipedia Article
Samples:
  • It was in a time that predates Hesiod or Homer.
  • Hesiod, Theogony, 744 ff.
    P.C. Cast & Kristin Cast  --  Marked
  • Around 700 B.C., much of the Greek mythology was written down by Homer and Hesiod.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • I have also done some Hesiod, a little scrap of Thucydides, and a lot of the Greek Testament….
    Thomas Hardy  --  Jude the Obscure

  • Show more
  • Their shared patterns of phrasing and storytelling point to a common tradition behind them, as do the songs of Hesiod, who lived around 700 B.C.: Hesiod uses the same meter as the Homeric poems, he shares much of their artificial poetic diction, and the stories he tells of early gods and heroes dovetail in many cases with the personnel of Trojan epics.
    Homer  --  The Iliad
  • This was a little cruel sometimes, when the back of what was cut out might be as innocent as Hesiod.
    Edward E. Hale  --  The Man Without a Country
  • Therefore it is not surprising that Gilgamesh, Enkidu, and Humbaba should seem to inhabit the same universe as the gods and mortals of the Homeric Hymns, Hesiod’s Theogony, and the Odyssey.
    Unknown  --  The Epic of Gilgamesh
  • What Were The Daemons Of The Ancients What kind of things they were, to whom they attributed the name of Daemons, appeareth partly in the Genealogie of their Gods, written by Hesiod, one of the most ancient Poets of the Graecians; and partly in other Histories; of which I have observed some few before, in the 12.
    Thomas Hobbes  --  Leviathan
  • But Tane-mahuta pauses not, he regards not their shrieks and cries; far, far beneath him he presses down the earth; far, far above him, he thrusts up the sky….37 As known to the Greeks, this story is rendered by Hesiod in his account of the separation of Ouranos (Father Heaven) from Gaia (Mother Earth).
    Joseph Campbell  --  The Hero With a Thousand Faces
  • The lines are taken from a translation of Works and Days, by the Greek poet, Hesiod.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson  --  Selected Essays

  • Show more again
  • What would not a man give if he might converse with Orpheus and Musaeus and Hesiod and Homer?
    Plato  --  The Apology
  • When he is overcome by the mysteries of the universe he turns to physics, not to Hesiod’s hexameters.
    Boris Pasternak  --  Doctor Zhivago
  • As she fell, Annabeth thought about Hesiod, the old Greek poet who’d speculated it would take nine days to fall from earth to Tartarus.
    Rick Riordan  --  The House of Hades
  • Formula and Premeditation in Homer and Hesiod," Arion VI (Autumn 1967).
    Homer  --  The Odyssey
  • …preluding thee, America, Old chants, Egyptian priests, and those of Ethiopia, The Hindu epics, the Grecian, Chinese, Persian, The Biblic books and prophets, and deep idyls of the Nazarene, The Iliad, Odyssey, plots, doings, wanderings of Eneas, Hesiod, Eschylus, Sophocles, Merlin, Arthur, The Cid, Roland at Roncesvalles, the Nibelungen, The troubadours, minstrels, minnesingers, skalds, Chaucer, Dante, flocks of singing birds, The Border Minstrelsy, the bye-gone ballads, feudal tales,…
    Walt Whitman  --  Leaves of Grass
  • She hoped Hesiod was wrong.
    Rick Riordan  --  The House of Hades
  • Their shared patterns of phrasing and storytelling point to a common tradition behind them, as do the songs of Hesiod, who lived around 700 B.C.: Hesiod uses the same meter as the Homeric poems, he shares much of their artificial poetic diction, and the stories he tells of early gods and heroes dovetail in many cases with the personnel of Trojan epics.
    Homer  --  The Iliad
  • It implies a baseless identification of civilized man with disease and natural man with health and well-being; while to equate the literate and sophisticated milieu of second millennium Babylonia, and early first millennium Assyria, with the simple world of Homer’s or Hesiod’s Greek contemporaries, let alone that of Levi-Strauss’s Amerindians, is highly misleading.
    Unknown  --  The Epic of Gilgamesh
  • For the Sumerians, Ocean was somewhere out beyond the Persian Gulf, and there too was Dilmun, where the rivers ran into the sea, so that ’the mouth of the rivers’ is exactly equivalent to the Greek ’springs of Ocean’, there were the Elysian Fields and the blessed isles of Homer and Hesiod, ’towards night, in the far west in a soft meadow among spring flowers’.
    Unknown  --  The Epic of Gilgamesh
  • The possible indebtedness of Greek mythology to the Orient has been treated in several recent books since T. B. L. Webster’s From Mycenae to Homer (London, 1958): by P. Walcott, in Hesiod and the Near East (Cardiff, 1966), G. S. Kirk, Myth, its Meaning and Functions in Ancient and Other Cultures (Cambridge, 1970), and M. L. West, Early Greek Philosophy and the Orient (Oxford, 1971).
    Unknown  --  The Epic of Gilgamesh
  • From Hesiod’s poem to Nyx, the Greek personification of night: "There also stands the gloomy house of Night; ghastly clouds shroud it in darkness.
    P.C. Cast & Kristin Cast  --  Marked
  • …Akhilleus’ tragic destiny: he will indeed excel his father, for no warrior at Troy was greater; but he will assuredly die, and not all his greatness and half-divine descent can fend off the destiny laid on him before his birth.13 A final tale, recounted in part by Hesiod but ignored by Homer, explains why the Greeks are at Troy, for no less a reader of The Iliad than Pope admitted that "the reader … is apt to wonder at the Greeks for endeavouring to recover her at such an expense.
    Homer  --  The Iliad
Search for samples from other sources:
(try right-click if popups are disabled)
Interest -- Source
General -- Google News®
General -- Time® Magazine
General -- Twitter®
Associated words [difficulty]:   Hesiod [9] , Aristophanes [6] , Sophocles [6] , Euripides [7] , Sappho [7] , Aeschylus [8] , Demosthenes [8] , Pindar [9]
     If popups are enabled: Search in OneLook®   If Flash® is also enabled: Search in Visuwords®
Most commonly used in these subjects:   Classic Literature, Philosophy, Religion & Spirtuality, Religion - Christianity
Home
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading