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Daniel Webster


After Daniel Webster.
Stephen King  --  Misery
  United States politician and orator (1782-1817)
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  • After Daniel Webster.
    Stephen King  --  Misery
  • The mayor of the village, in delivering the prize to the author of it, made a warm speech in which he said that it was by far the most "eloquent" thing he had ever listened to, and that Daniel Webster himself might well be proud of it.
    Mark Twain  --  The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
  • This pattern holds from the Elizabethan Christopher Marlowe’s Dr. Faustus through the nineteenth-century Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s Faust to the twentieth century’s Stephen Vincent Benet’s "The Devil and Daniel Webster" and Damn Yankees.
    Thomas C. Foster  --  How to Read Literature Like a Professor
  • "And, if I am, I’ll still be Daniel Webster," said Dan’l.
    Stephen Vincent Benét  --  The Devil and Daniel Webster

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  • It was because Daniel Webster conscientiously favored compromise in 1850 that he earned a condemnation unsurpassed in the annals of political history.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • From where I sit typing, I can see across the quad to the space between Hunter Hall and Old Ivy through which visitors must pass on their way to the dorms or Daniel Webster Hall, where visitors are entertained by students in one of the parlors.
    Robert Cormier  --  After the First Death
  • Daniel Webster, an American statesman and orator who was living when this essay was written.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson  --  Selected Essays
  • Tappan’s first choice was Daniel Webster, the best known and perhaps most respected lawyer in the nation.
    Alexs Pate  --  Amistad
  • Henry Clay, John C. Calhoun and Daniel Webster believed that this compromise would heal the rapidly growing breach between the North and the South.
    Ann Petry  --  Harriet Tubman
  • "The vernacular tongue of the country," said Daniel Webster, "has become greatly vitiated, depraved and corrupted by the style of the congressional debates."
    Henry L. Mencken  --  The American Language

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  • Cannon boomed from Mount Wollaston, bells rang, and the procession that carried the casket from the Adams house to the church included the governor, the president of Harvard, members of the state legislature, and Congressman Daniel Webster.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • I walked her to the House of Representatives, then walked her back to the Senate, where we watched a man addressing an empty room, and I lectured her about Daniel Webster, Henry Clay, John C. Calhoun, and Thaddeus Stevens, and—in a reprise of my assault on Herb—told her what a bicameral legislature was.
    Russell Baker  --  Growing Up
  • —REPORT OF DANIEL WEBSTER’S SPEECH IN THE U. S. SENATE, ON THE APPLICATION FOR THE ERECTION OF A BREAKWATER AT NANTUCKET.
    Herman Melville  --  Moby Dick
  • John Quincy Adams, Daniel Webster, Sam Houston, Thomas Hart Benton, Edmund G. Ross, Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar, George Norris and Robert Taft imparted a heritage to us.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • But wheezing and coughing fitfully, Henry Clay made his way through the snowdrifts to the home of Daniel Webster.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • For an hour he outlined its contents to Daniel Webster in the warmth of the latter’s comfortable home, and together they talked of saving the Union.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • Daniel Webster is familiar to many of us today as the battler for Jabez Stone’s soul against the devil in Stephen Vincent Benet’s story.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • But how Daniel Webster could express it!
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • And Daniel Webster was not as great as he looked.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • How could Henry Clay then hope to win approval to such a plan from Daniel Webster of Massachusetts?
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • But Daniel Webster feared that civil violence "would only rivet the chains of slavery the more strongly."
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • And thus on that fateful January night, Daniel Webster promised Henry Clay his conditional support, and took inventory of the crisis about him.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • Daniel Webster preferred to risk his career and his reputation rather than risk the Union.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • For three hours and eleven minutes, with only a few references to his extensive notes, Daniel Webster pleaded the Union’s cause.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • Daniel Webster did succeed.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • We may remember Daniel Webster for his subservience to the National Bank throughout much of his career, but we have forgotten his sacrifice for the national good at the close of that career.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • III — Daniel Webster.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • That secession did not occur in 1850 instead of 1861 is due in great part to Daniel Webster, who was in large measure responsible for the country’s acceptance of Henry Clay’s compromise.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • Of these, only Daniel Webster was to share with Benton and Houston the ignominy of constituent wrath and the humiliation of political downfall at the hands of the states they had loved and championed.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • Only the Clay Compromise, Daniel Webster decided, could avert secession and civil war; and he wrote a friend that he planned "to make an honest truth-telling speech and a Union speech, and discharge a clear conscience."
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • In the third—that involving Daniel Webster of Massachusetts—even death, which came within two years of his great decision, did not halt the calumnies heaped upon him by his enemies, who had sadly embittered his last days.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • But whatever his faults, Daniel Webster remained the greatest orator of his day, the leading member of the American Bar, one of the most renowned leaders of the Whig party, and the only Senator capable of checking Calhoun.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • For the Compromise of 1850 added to Henry Clay’s garlands as the great Pacificator; but Daniel Webster’s support, which insured its success, resulted in his political crucifixion, and, for half a century or more, his historical condemnation.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • And for Daniel Webster, the arrogant, scornful giant of the ages who believed himself above political rancor, Whittier’s attack was especially bitter.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • But Daniel Webster was doomed to disappointment in his hopes that this latent support might again enable him to seek the Presidency.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • But this "profound selfishness," which Emerson was so certain the speech represented, could not have entered into Daniel Webster’s motivations.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • But to the very end he was true to character, asking on his deathbed, "Wife, children, doctor, I trust on this occasion I have said nothing unworthy of Daniel Webster."
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • It was understood by Daniel Webster, who dedicated the printed copies to the people of Massachusetts with these words: "Necessity compels me to speak true rather than pleasing things…… I should indeed like to please you; but I prefer to save you, whatever be your attitude toward me."
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • The bitter animosities on both sides of the Mason-Dixon line which had engulfed Daniel Webster, Thomas Hart Benton and Sam Houston continued unabated for some two decades after the war.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • The crowd fell silent as Daniel Webster rose slowly to his feet, all the impressive powers of his extraordinary physical appearance—the great, dark, brooding eyes, the wonderfully bronzed complexion, the majestic domed forehead—commanding the same awe they had commanded for more than thirty years.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • And finally, the name of Daniel Webster was humiliated for all time in the literature of our land by the cutting words of the usually gentle John Greenleaf Whittier in his immortal poem "Ichabod": So fallen!
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • He was excitedly interrupted by the Sergeant at Arms, who told him that even then—two hours before the Senate was to meet—the chamber, the galleries, the anterooms and even the corridors of the Capitol were filled with those who had been traveling for days from all parts of the nation to hear Daniel Webster.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • Lewis Tappan had appealed to the new Secretary of State, Daniel Webster, to see if the President could be persuaded to provide transportation to the tribesmen anyway.
    Alexs Pate  --  Amistad
  • Unlike the acts of Daniel Webster or Edmund Ross, it did not change history.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • Tyler, on the other hand, despised Adams; and Adams was disgusted with "the envious temper, the ravenous ambition and the rotten heart of Daniel Webster."
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • Daniel Webster, according to his critics, fruitlessly appeased the slavery forces, Thomas Hart Benton was an unyielding and pompous egocentric, Sam Houston was cunning, changeable and unreliable.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • Among the acquaintances and colleagues who march across the pages of his diary are Sam Adams (a kinsman), John Hancock, Washington, Jefferson, Franklin, Lafayette, John Jay, James Madison, James Monroe, John Marshall, Henry Clay, Andrew Jackson, Thomas Hart Benton, John Tyler, John C. Calhoun, Daniel Webster, Lincoln, James Buchanan, William Lloyd Garrison, Andrew Johnson, Jefferson Davis and many others.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • With all his faults and failings, Daniel Webster was undoubtedly the most talented figure in our Congressional history: not in his ability to win men to a cause—he was no match in that with Henry Clay; not in his ability to hammer out a philosophy of government—Calhoun outshone him there; but in his ability to make alive and supreme the latent sense of oneness, of Union, that all Americans felt but which few could express.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • The New York Tribune considered it "unequal to the occasion and unworthy of its author"; the New York Evening Post spoke in terms of a "traitorous retreat …. a man who deserted the cause which helately defended"; and the Abolitionist press called it "the scarlet infamy of Daniel Webster…… An indescribably base and wicked speech."
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • So Daniel Webster, who neither could have intended his speech as an improvement of his political popularity nor permitted his ambitions to weaken his plea for the Union, died a disappointed and discouraged death in 1852, his eyes fixed on the flag flying from the mast of the sailboat he had anchored in view of his bedroom window.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
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