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George III


-ALEXANDER WEDDERBURN, SOLICITOR GENERAL OF ENGLAND, TO GEORGE III, KING OF ENGLAND
Laurie Halse Anderson  --  Chains
  King of Great Britain and Ireland from 1760 to 1820; the American colonies were lost during his reign; he became insane in 1811 and his son (later George IV) acted as regent until 1820 (1738-1820)
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George III King George III
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  • -ALEXANDER WEDDERBURN, SOLICITOR GENERAL OF ENGLAND, TO GEORGE III, KING OF ENGLAND
    Laurie Halse Anderson  --  Chains
  • In between that calamity and this, they had visited George III in London, published a newspaper, made baskets, led Oglethorpe through forests, helped Andrew Jackson fight Creek, cooked maize, drawn up a constitution, petitioned the King of Spain, been experimented on by Dartmouth, established asylums, wrote their language, resisted settlers, shot bear and translated scripture.
    Toni Morrison  --  Beloved
  • Opposed to his British style was his patriotic anger at George III.
    Saul Bellow  --  The Adventures of Augie March
  • Fancy our late monarch George III when he heard of the revolt of the North American colonies: fancy brazen Goliath when little David stepped forward and claimed a meeting; and you have the feelings of Mr. Reginald Cuff when this rencontre was proposed to him.
    William Makepeace Thackeray  --  Vanity Fair

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  • George III had had it built years before, insisting that it be "superb."
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • It was 1760, the year twenty-two-year-old George III was crowned king and Adams turned twenty-five.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • Thomas Hutchinson, discoursing to George III in 1774, used /corn/ in this restricted sense, speaking of "rye and /corn/ mixed."
    Henry L. Mencken  --  The American Language
  • The resultant unscrupulous freedom of thought made Byron a greater poet than Wordsworth just as it made Peter a greater king than George III; but as it was, after all, only a negative qualification, it did not prevent Peter from being an appalling blackguard and an arrant poltroon, nor did it enable Byron to become a religious force like Shelley.
    George Bernard Shaw  --  Man And Superman
  • The petition was agreed to—only to be summarily dismissed by George III, who refused even to look at it and proclaimed the colonies in a state of rebellion.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • King George III.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams

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  • GEORGE III had been twenty-two when, in 1760, he succeeded to the throne, and to a remarkable degree he remained a man of simple tastes and few pretensions.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • Slavery and the slave trade were hardly the fault of George III, however ardently Jefferson wished to fix the blame on the distant monarch.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • Samuel Johnson, the era’s reigning arbiter of all things of the mind, and no easy judge of men, responded warmly to the "unaffected good nature" of George III.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • By the crisp, sunny afternoon of October 26, as George III proceeded on his way to the opening of Parliament, his popularity had never seemed higher.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • In sum, he, George III, Sovereign of the Empire, had declared America in rebellion.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • On New Year’s Day, Monday, January 1, 1776, the first copies of the speech delivered by King George III at the opening of Parliament back in October were sent across the lines from Boston.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • Written to be understood by everyone, Common Sense attacked the very idea of hereditary monarchy as absurd and evil, and named the "royal brute" George III as the cause of every woe in America.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • In New York they were shown the sights—City Hall, the college, and at Bowling Green, at the foot of Broadway, the gilded equestrian statue of King George III, which had yet to be pulled from its pedestal by an angry mob.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • George III relied on him, calling him "my sheet anchor," and it was, and would remain, North’s role to explain and defend the King and administration policies and decisions before the Commons.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • He was convinced, like mostEnglishmen, that the great majority of Americans remained loyal to George III and that such men as the three seated before him at the table were an insignificant minority.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • In New York the next day, the Declaration was read aloud to Washington’s assembled troops, and it was that night, at the foot of Broadway, that a roaring crowd pulled down the larger-than-life equestrian statue of George III.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • Soon after, in early November, King George III appointed a new Secretary for the American colonies, Lord George Germain, a choice that left little doubt, if any remained, that the King, too, considered the conquest of America serious work to which he was seriously committed.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • Like John Adams, King George III was devoted to farming.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • Adams would later say George III was the greatest talker he had ever known.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • The strange behavior—the so-called "madness" of King George III—for which he would be long remembered, did not come until much later, more than twenty years later, and rather than mental illness, it appears to have been porphyria, a hereditary disease not diagnosed until the twentieth century.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • When the news finally reached Savannah, Georgia, in August, it set off a day-long celebration during which the Declaration was read four times in four different public places and the largest crowd in the history of the province gathered for a mock burial of King George III.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • Praying silently on his own, Adams asked that George III "be brought to consideration and repentance and to do justice to his enemies and to all the world."
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • George III was to turn forty-seven on June 4, which made him two years younger than Adams, and though taller, he had a comparable "inclination to corpulence."
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • When, in September, an emissary from the Continental Congress at Philadelphia, Richard Penn, arrived in London with an "Olive Branch Petition" in hand, expressing loyalty to the Crown and requesting, in effect, that the King find a way to reconciliation, George III refused to have anything to do with it.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • Lord North, the Prime Minister, had delivered a conciliatory speech to Parliament; George III even recommended opening a channel of communication with "that insidious man" Franklin, with the result that a host of British agents began beating a path to Paris to ascertain what peace terms the Americans might consider.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • Whilst the Princess Royal [Charlotte Augusta Matilda, the oldest daughter of George III and Queen Charlotte] looked compassionate, and asked me if I was much fatigued, and observed that it was a very full drawing room.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • Thus it was Adams, Franklin, and Jay who represented the United States at the ceremony at the Hotel d’York on the Rue Jacob, and who signed their names in that order, along with a new representative of King George III, David Hartley.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • The formal readings concluded, a great mob of cheering, shouting soldiers and townspeople stormed down Broadway to Bowling Green, where, with ropes and bars, they pulled down the gilded lead statue of George III on his colossal horse.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • Adams felt as he had when he first appeared before George III—as if he were on stage playing a part.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • As greatly as he admired the British constitution and the British structure of government, he considered the British as insolent as ever, and the unfortunate "mad" George III (by now the victim of porphyria), a hopeless blunderer.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • Lieutenant Isaac Bangs of Massachusetts, who in his journal would provide one of the fullest accounts of unfolding events that spring and summer, wrote of his walking tours about town and such sights to be seen as the waterworks and the larger-than-life equestrian statue of King George III, which dominated Bowling Green in front of Washington’s headquarters.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • WITH THE NEW YEAR, news arrived from England that on October 31 in London, His Majesty King George III had once again ridden in splendor from St. James’s Palace to Westminster to address the opening of Parliament on the still-distressing war in America.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • It had been so used when George III was king; and a picture of the Marquis of Gaunt is still extant, with his hair in powder and a pink ribbon, in a Roman shape, as it was called, enacting the part of Cato in Mr. Addison’s tragedy of that name, performed before their Royal Highnesses the Prince of Wales, the Bishop of Osnaburgh, and Prince William Henry, then children like the actor.
    William Makepeace Thackeray  --  Vanity Fair
  • (It was Adams’s first encounter with the famous stutter of George III.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • On February 20, he had his "audience of leave" with George III, who in parting said, "Mr.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • "When Adams presented Jefferson at the King’s levee at St. James’s on March i 5, George III could not have been "more ungracious" in his "notice of Mr. Adams and myself," according to an account later provided by Jefferson.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • God save Great George our King,
    Long live our noble King,
    God save the King!
    Send him victorious,
    Happy and glorious,
    Long to reign o’er us; God save the King!
    ON THE AFTERNOON Of Thursday, October 26, 1775, His Royal Majesty George III, King of England, rode in royal splendor from St. James’s Palace to the Palace of Westminster, there to address the opening of Parliament on the increasingly distressing issue of war in America.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
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Associated words [difficulty]:   George III [5] , Queen Elizabeth [5] , Queen Victoria [5] , Henry V [7] , Richard III [7] , Charles I [8] , Henry VIII [8] , Henry II [9] , Mary, Queen of Scots [9] , Cleopatra [4] , Gorbachev [5] , J. Edgar Hoover [5] , Queen Elizabeth [5] , Queen Victoria [5] , Sigmund Freud [5] , Booker T. Washington [6] , Buffalo Bill [6] , Charles Darwin [6] , Daniel Webster [6] , Henry Clay [6] , Jawaharlal Nehru [6] , Joan of Arc [6] , Malcolm X [6] , Nelson Mandela [6] , Thomas Edison [6] , Tutankhamun [6] , Charles V [7] , Charles de Gaulle [7] , Che Guevara [7] , Colin Powell [7] , Eleanor Roosevelt [7] , H.L. Mencken [7] , Henry David Thoreau [7] , Henry Kissinger [7] , Henry V [7] , Ho Chi Minh [7] , Ivan the Terrible [7] , Julia Child [7] , Marcus Aurelius [7] , Marie Antoinette [7] , Nero [7] , Pericles [7] , Richard III [7] , Tiberius [7] , Amelia Earhart [8] , Billy the Kid [8] , Caligula [8] , Catherine the Great [8] , Charles I [8] , Henry VIII [8] , Horace Greeley [8] , John Muir [8] , Lorenzo de Medici [8] , Margaret Thatcher [8] , Mussolini [8] , Sun Yat-sen [8] , Susan B. Anthony [8] , William Lloyd Garrison [8] , Alexander Graham Bell [9] , Ansel Adams [9] , Blaise Pascal [9] , Boris Yeltsin [9] , Carl Jung [9] , Gertrude Stein [9] , Gregor Mendel [9] , Henry II [9] , Indira Gandhi [9] , Jane Goodall [9] , Johannes Gutenberg [9] , Kubla Khan [9] , Margaret Mead [9] , Mary, Queen of Scots [9] , Max Weber [9] , Noam Chomsky [9] , Peter the Great [9] , Pope John Paul II [9] , Simón Bolívar [9] , Watson and Crick [9] , William James [9] , William Penn [9] , Wright brothers [9]
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