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John Hancock
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John Hancock


The John Hancock Insurance company is named after him.
  patriot of the American Revolution famous for his prominent signature on the Declaration of Independence (1737-1793)
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Notes:
Because "John Hancock" placed such a large signature on the Declaration of Independence, people will sometimes use his name as a synonym for signature; e.g., "Put your John Hancock there."
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Samples:
  • The John Hancock Insurance company is named after him.
  • -LETTER FROM JOHN HANCOCK, PRESIDENT OF THE CONTINENTAL CONGRESS, TO GENERAL GEORGE WASHINGTON
    Laurie Halse Anderson  --  Chains
  • Revere and his close friend Joseph Warren became more and more convinced that the British were about to make the major move that had long been rumored — to march to the town of Lexington, northwest of Boston, to arrest the colonial leaders John Hancock and Samuel Adams, and then on to the town of Concord to seize the stores of guns and ammunition that some of the local colonial militia had stored there.
    Malcolm Gladwell  --  The Tipping Point
  • Whenever Thompson twanged, "Put your John Hancock on that line," Babbitt was as much amused by the antiquated provincialism as any proper Englishman by any American.
    Sinclair Lewis  --  Babbitt

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  • Among the acquaintances and colleagues who march across the pages of his diary are Sam Adams (a kinsman), John Hancock, Washington, Jefferson, Franklin, Lafayette, John Jay, James Madison, James Monroe, John Marshall, Henry Clay, Andrew Jackson, Thomas Hart Benton, John Tyler, John C. Calhoun, Daniel Webster, Lincoln, James Buchanan, William Lloyd Garrison, Andrew Johnson, Jefferson Davis and many others.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • There was no money in his background, no Adams fortune or elegant Adams homestead like the Boston mansion of John Hancock.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • John Hancock, the President of the Continental Congress, was thirty-nine, John Adams, forty, Thomas Jefferson, thirty-two, younger even than the young Rhode Island general.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • "It is not in the pages of history, perhaps, to furnish a case like ours," Washington informed John Hancock, president of the Continental Congress.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • Among his clients were many of the richest men in the colony, including John Hancock.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • At ten o’clock, with the doors closed, John Hancock sounded the gavel.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams

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  • For now, only the President, John Hancock, and the Secretary of the Congress, Charles Thomson, fixed their signatures.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • John Hancock was beset by gout.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • His army was falling apart, Washington informed John Hancock in a bleak letter from Harlem Heights on September 25.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • John Hancock, whose stone mansion on Beacon Hill overlooking the Common was one of the prominent features on the skyline, had spoken "heartily" for the measure.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • At six feet two-and-a-half inches, he stood taller than all but a few and towered over someone like John Hancock, who at five feet four was perhaps the shortest man in the assembly.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • Filling page after page, he enumerated the same troubles and woes he had been reporting persistently to Congress for so long, and that he would report still again to John Hancock that same day.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • He was as prominent and trustworthy a man as any in the province, it was thought, a member of the Provincial Congress, poet, author, a Harvard classmate of John Hancock, and an outspoken patriot.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • The Continental Congress had appointed George Washington to lead "the army of the United Colonies," but in correspondence with the general, the President of Congress, John Hancock, referred to it only as "the troops under your command."
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • Washington accepted the decision, but work on the flat-bottomed boats continued, and in a long letter to John Hancock, he made the case for a "decisive stroke," adding, "I cannot say that I have wholly laid it aside."
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • It was the New Englanders who held firm for independence, though two of the Massachusetts delegation, John Hancock and Robert Treat Paine, exhibited nothing like the zeal of either Samuel Adams or Elhridge Gerry.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • Also listed was Dorcas Griffith, who ran a notorious waterfront grog shop and was known to be John Hancock’s "discarded" mistress.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • The humiliation the British had been subjected to, John Hancock warned Washington, could well make them an even more formidable foe.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • "These things are melancholy, but they are nevertheless true," Washington reported to John Hancock.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • Or so he wrote to John Hancock.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • On Monday, June Io, after President John Hancock reconvened the assembly, Rutledge and the "cool party" succeeded in having the finalvote delayed for twenty days, until July 1, to allow delegates from the middle colonies time to send for new instructions.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • Losing no time, Knox then set sail by pilot boat to meet the Lucretia and deliver an official welcome to Minister Adams and his lady from Governor John Hancock.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • AT SOME POINT in the course of Wednesday, August 2 1, Washington scratched off a quick note to John Hancock to say only that he had "nothing special" to communicate.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • The president of Congress, John Hancock, had only in recent years freed the last of the slaves who were part of his lavish Boston household, and it was well known, as Jefferson said, that New Englanders had been "considerable carriers" in the lucrative slave trade.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • On the day he had called on his fellow delegates to put their colleague, "the gentleman fromVirginia," in command at Boston, Washington, out of modesty, had left the chamber, while a look of mortification, as Adams would tell the story, filled the face of John Hancock, who had hoped he would be chosen.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • Whether Benjamin Franklin quipped "We must all hang together, or most assuredly we shall hang separately" is impossible to know, just as there is no way to confirm the much-repeated story that the diminutive John Hancock wrote his name large so the King might read it without his spectacles.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • In formal acceptance of the new command, on June 16, 1775, standing at his place in Congress, he had addressed John Hancock: I am truly sensible of the high honor done me in this appointment, yet I feel great distress from a consciousness that my abilities and military experience may not be equal to the extensive and important trust.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • Writing to John Hancock earlier, Washington had offered a candid appraisal of Sullivan as "spirited and zealously attached to the Cause," but also a man touched with a "tincture of vanity" and too great a "desire of being popular."
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • The town, although it had "suffered greatly," was not in as bad shape as he had expected, he wrote to John Hancock, "and I have a particular pleasure in being able to inform you, sir, that your house has received no damage worth mentioning."
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • On Saturday the 14th, Washington received another directive from John Hancock.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • Washington doubted that Howe would close the campaign "without attempting something more," as he wrote to John Hancock.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • "The movements and designs of the enemy are not yet understood," Washington reported to John Hancock.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • "The enemy are fast advancing," he reported in a hurried dispatch to John Hancock, noting that the time was half past one.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • "I have not heard a word from General Lee since the 26th of last month," John Hancock read in a letter from Washington dated December 3.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • "Unless some speedy, and effectual measures are adopted by Congress, our cause will be lost," he told John Hancock in a long, foreboding letter dated September 25.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • By the time the council convened, on September 7, at Washington’s headquarters at the Mortier house north of town, the letter from John Hancock had arrived saying Congress wanted no damage done to New York.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • In Philadelphia, Congress resolved that in the event General Washington found it necessary to withdraw from New York, there must be "no damage" done to the city, as Washington was informed in a letter from John Hancock.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • From Baltimore, addressing Washington on behalf of the entire Congress, John Hancock said that the victory at Trenton was all the more "extraordinary" given that it had been achieved by men "broken by fatigue and ill-fortune."
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • Beside him, facing the desk where John Hancock sat in the president’s chair, were Roger Sherman, Robert Liv-ingston, Jefferson, and Franklin, all dead now except Jefferson, who in the painting held the Declaration in his hands.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • In another letter to John Hancock, he stated flatly that "Philadelphia beyond all question is the object of the enemy’s movements," that "nothing less than our utmost exertions" could stop Howe, and that his own force was too thin and weak to count on.
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • As he would explain succinctly to John Hancock, "I well knew we could not reach it [Trenton] before day was fairly broke, but as I was certain there was no making a retreat without being discovered, and harassed on repassing the river, I determined to push on at all events."
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
  • A letter from John Hancock to Washington, as well as the complete text of the Declaration, followed two days later: That our affairs may take a more favorable turn [Hancock wrote], the Congress have judged it necessary to dissolve the connection between Great Britain and the American colonies, and to declare them free and independent states; as you will perceive by the enclosed Declaration, which I am directed to transmit to you, and to request you will have it proclaimed at the headů
    David G. McCullough  --  1776
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Associated words [difficulty]:   John Hancock [5] , Patrick Henry [5] , Paul Revere [5] , Benedict Arnold [6] , Thomas Paine [6] , John Paul Jones [8]
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