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Cassandra Clare  --  City of Heavenly Fire
  important city of ancient Mesopotamia; on the Euphrates near modern-day Baghdad
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Babylon Babylonian Babylonians
Babylon no longer exists as a city.  Some have identified it as largest city in the world from c. 1770 to 1670 BC, and again between c. 612 and 320 BC. It was perhaps the first city to reach a population above 200,000.

It is also famous for "The Hanging Gardens of Babylon" — one of the seven wonders of the ancient world.
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Largest Cities Through History
    Cassandra Clare  --  City of Heavenly Fire
    Michael Ondaatje  --  Running in the Family
  • My order goes back before Babylon.
    Neil Gaiman  --  The Graveyard Book
  • The gardens were a serene and blossoming oasis amid the swarm of a chaotic Babylon.
    William Styron  --  Sophie’s Choice

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  • Reading across from left to right it looked as if my mother was slowly dissolving, from real life into a Babylonian bas-relief shadow.
    Margaret Atwood  --  Cat’s Eye
  • I glugged from my water canteen and, to tell the truth, I felt like a plant on the Hanging Gardens of Babylon.
    Marcus Luttrell  --  Lone Survivor
  • No doubt the Babylonians were already out scouting around for their favorite rocks.
    Barbara Kingsolver  --  The Poisonwood Bible
  • His scientific precision was impeccable and his erudition astounding; no one could refute him on the cooking utensils of Babylon or the doormats of Byzantium.
    Ayn Rand  --  The Fountainhead
  • ’That has the rivers of Babylon in it, sir,’ the chaplain replied.
    Joseph Heller  --  Catch-22
  • And I knew enough even then to know that it wasn’t Greek, or Old Egyptian, or Babylonian, or Hittite, or Chinese.
    C.S. Lewis  --  The Magician’s Nephew

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  • To have been Belshazzar, King of Babylon; and to have been Belshazzar, not haughtily but courteously, therein certainly must have been some touch of mundane grandeur.
    Herman Melville  --  Moby Dick
  • The word used in the Codex is similar to an ancient Babylonian symbol that can mean either thing, Flamel explained.
    Micheal Scott  --  The Alchemyst
  • It was like a page torn from some storybook, from some historical novel about the captivity of Babylon or the Spanish Inquisition.
    Elie Wiesel  --  Night
  • Babylon violated lessens Alexander, Rome enchained lessens Caesar, Jerusalem murdered lessens Titus, tyranny follows the tyrant.
    Victor Hugo  --  Les Miserables
  • This Issachar was the most choleric Hebrew that had ever been seen in Israel since the Captivity in Babylon.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • He waved his hand; and it was as though, with an invisible feather wisk, he had brushed away a little dust, and the dust was Harappa, was Ur of the Chaldees; some spider-webs, and they were Thebes and Babylon and Cnossos and Mycenae.
    Aldous Huxley  --  Brave New World
  • I took the huge volumes of the Palestinian Talmud from my father’s library—the text we studied in school was the Babylonian Talmud—and checked its parallel discussions just to see how it differed from the discussions in the Babylonian Talmud.
    Chaim Potok  --  The Chosen
  • "Come, is Babylon reformed, or have you degenerated?" she added, glancing with a simper at Kitty.
    Leo Tolstoy  --  Anna Karenina
  • ’There dwelt a man in Babylon, lady, lady.’
    William Shakespeare  --  Twelfth Night
  • Babylon.
    James Joyce  --  Ulysses
  • Many of the villages of Mesopotamia are built of second-hand bricks of a very good quality, obtained from the ruins of Babylon, and the cement on them is older and probably harder still.
    Henry David Thoreau  --  Walden
  • Galahad, Percivale and Bors had found it, and with it, and with the body of Percivale’s sister, they had arrived at Sarras in Babylon.
    T. H. White  --  The Once and Future King
  • This inexplicable incident, this reversal of my previous experience, seemed, like the Babylonian finger on the wall, to be spelling out the letters of my judgment; and I began to reflect more seriously than ever before on the issues and possibilities of my double existence.
    Robert Louis Stevenson  --  Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
  • Not Babylon Nor great Alcairo such magnificence Equalled in all their glories, to enshrine Belus or Serapis their gods, or seat Their kings, when Egypt with Assyria strove In wealth and luxury.
    John Milton  --  Paradise Lost
  • It has even been claimed from the evidence of this story that the Babylonians were social evolutionists!
    Unknown  --  The Epic of Gilgamesh
  • I will not tell you, poor old man, to go and visit the sepulchral chambers of the pyramids, of which ancient Herodotus speaks, nor the brick tower of Babylon, nor the immense white marble sanctuary of the Indian temple of Eklinga.
    Victor Hugo  --  The Hunchback of Notre Dame
  • You are young and rich—leave Paris—all is soon forgotten in this great Babylon of excitement and changing tastes.
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Count of Monte Cristo
  • This "Babylonian captivity" lasted until 539 B.C. when the people were permitted to return to Jerusalem, and the great temple was restored.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • But when Homer fleshes out this picture by showing Zeus presiding over a council of gods or by recounting how he rose to kingship by violently overthrowing his father, the nearest parallels are to be found among such figures as the Babylonian Marduk and the Hurrian-Hittite Kumarbi.
    Homer  --  The Iliad
  • It is argument sufficient they were written after the captivity in Babylon, that the History of them is continued till that time.
    Thomas Hobbes  --  Leviathan
  • She poured it out upon the square, on the walks, on the streets, and the old Norman city outspread before her eyes as an enormous capital, as a Babylon into which she was entering.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • When Bors saw that he was in so far countries as in the parts of Babylon he departed from Sarras, and armed him and came to the sea, and entered into a ship; and so it befell him in good adventure he came into the realm of Logris; and he rode so fast till he came to Camelot where the king was.
    Thomas Malory  --  Le Morte D’Arthur
  • She would be able to look at them, and think not only that d’Urberville, like Babylon, had fallen, but that the individual innocence of a humble descendant could lapse as silently.
    Thomas Hardy  --  Tess of the d’Urbervilles
  • Y’ know, Babylon once had two million people in it, and all we know about ’m is the names of the kings and some copies of wheat contracts and—the sales of slaves.
    Thornton Wilder  --  Our Town
  • During this time Euclides had surfaced with so many proofs of his tale that it was no longer a question of playing with earrings and rings scattered amid the coral but of financing a major enterprise to salvage the fifty ships with their cargo of Babylonian treasure.
    Gabriel Garcia Marquez  --  Love in the Time of Cholera
  • There is iron-dust on everything; and the smoke is seen through the windows rolling heavily out of the tall chimneys to mingle with the smoke from a vaporous Babylon of other chimneys.
    Charles Dickens  --  Bleak House
  • And some day or other (but it will be after our time, thank goodness) Hyde Park Gardens will be no better known than the celebrated horticultural outskirts of Babylon, and Belgrave Square will be as desolate as Baker Street, or Tadmor in the wilderness.
    William Makepeace Thackeray  --  Vanity Fair
  • ’In bidding adieu to the modern Babylon, where we have undergone many vicissitudes, I trust not ignobly, Mrs. Micawber and myself cannot disguise from our minds that we part, it may be for years and it may be for ever, with an individual linked by strong associations to the altar of our domestic life.
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • And when the diver had reached the bottom of the bottomless sea, he plucked the plant, though it mutilated his hand, cut off the stones, * Babylonian prototype of the biblical Noah.
    Joseph Campbell  --  The Hero With a Thousand Faces
  • …returned, the last heirs to Melquiades’ science, and they found the town so defeated and its inhabitants so removed from the rest of the world that once more they went through the houses dragging magnetized ingots as if that really were the Babylonian wise men’s latest discovery, and once again they concentrated the sun’s rays with the giant magnifying glass, and there was no lack of people standing open-mouthed watching kettles fall and pots roll and who paid fifty cents to be…
    Gabriel Garcia Marquez  --  One Hundred Years of Solitude
  • Human beings, in their generous endeavour to construct a hypothesis that shall not degrade a First Cause, have always hesitated to conceive a dominant power of lower moral quality than their own; and, even while they sit down and weep by the waters of Babylon, invent excuses for the oppression which prompts their tears.
    Thomas Hardy  --  The Return of the Native
  • Passengers looking from trains saw her as a village woman of fading prettiness, incorruptible virtue, and no abnormalities; the baggageman heard her say, "Oh yes, I do think it will be a good example for the children"; and all the while she saw herself running garlanded through the streets of Babylon.
    Sinclair Lewis  --  Main Street
  • The hanging gardens of Babylon were one of the seven wonders of the world.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson  --  Selected Essays
  • It was no wonder the Babylonians had once ruled the world.
    Ted Dekker  --  BoneMan’s Daughters
  • Babel’s a city in Babylon, right?
    Neal Stephenson  --  Snow Crash
  • "In the ancient conflict of the Jews and the Babylonians," he said—but there he was cut off.
    John Gardner  --  The Sunlight Dialogues
  • London, which—which I have read about as the modern Babylon of civilization, seems to have disappeared.
    William Morris  --  News from Nowhere
  • The powerful king, who ruled ancient Babylon from 1792 to 1750 B.C., had a keen sense of right and wrong.
    Bryan Brown  --  Laying Down the LAW
  • The scarlet woman and she of Babylon flaunted their vileness there; the cities of the plain were not more wicked.
    W. Somerset Maugham  --  Of Human Bondage
  • Taken from Babylon.
    Kami Garcia & Margaret Stohl  --  Beautiful Creatures
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Associated words [difficulty]:   Babylon [3] , Assyria [6] , Mesopotamia [7] , Roman Empire [3] , ancient Greece [3] , Hellenic [5] , Assyria [6] , ancient Egypt [6] , Mesopotamia [7] , Byzantine Empire [9]
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