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Robert Frost
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Robert Frost


Robert Frost’s Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening is arguably to poetry what the Mona Lisa is to painting.
  U.S. poet considered by many to be the greatest of the 20th century; famous for lyrical poems set in rural New England such as "The Road Not Taken" (1874-1963)
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Notes:
Perhaps the most familiar lines Frost wrote are from the end of The Road Not Taken:

    Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
    I took the one less traveled by,
    And that has made all the difference.

Other famous lines come from then end of Frost’s favorite poem, Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening:

    The woods are lovely, dark and deep.
    But I have promises to keep,
    And miles to go before I sleep,
    And miles to go before I sleep.

Frost received four Pulitzer Prizes, was named American Poet Laureate, and recited his poetry at John F. Kennedy’s inauguration.
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Poem: The Road Not Taken
Poem: Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
Samples:
  • Robert Frost’s Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening is arguably to poetry what the Mona Lisa is to painting.
  • Robert Frost’s epitaph reads, "I had a lover’s quarrel with the world."
  • One time she climbed a tree, hiding up there so she wouldn’t have to memorize a poem by Robert Frost.
    Sue Monk Kidd  --  The Secret Life of Bees
  • That was what I meant" "Robert Frost wrote it.
    S.E. Hinton  --  The Outsiders

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  • Robert Frost PREFACE ALL OUR ATTEMPTS AT SUBTERFUGE HAD BEEN IN VAIN.
    Stephenie Meyer  --  Eclipse
  • Andrews averaged fifteen to twenty books a week; his taste encompassed both trash and belle-lettres, and he liked poetry, Robert Frost’s particularly, but he also admired Whitman, Emily Dickinson, and the comic poems of Ogden Nash.
    Truman Capote  --  In Cold Blood
  • -Robert Frost ________________________________________ JUST LISTEN ________________________________________ Chapter One I taped the commercial back in April, before anything had happened, and promptly forgot about it.
    Sarah Dessen  --  Just Listen
  • Robert Frost has a poem, "Out, Out—" (1916), about a momentary lapse of attention and the terrible act of violence that ensues.
    Thomas C. Foster  --  How to Read Literature Like a Professor
  • A CONFLUENCE OF PATHS Two roads diverged in the middle of my life, I heard a wise man say I took the road less traveled by And that’s made the difference every night and every day —Larry Norman (with apologies to Robert Frost) March unleashed a torrent of rainfall after an abnormally dry winter.
    William P. Young  --  The Shack
  • Don Baithazar thought that the venerable Daton was a fraud, that Salmud Brevy and Robert Frost should have hanged themselves with their own entrails, that Wordsworth was a fool, and that anything less than Shakespeare’s sonnets was a profanation of the language.
    Dan Simmons  --  Hyperion

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  • Robert Frost.
    Kami Garcia & Margaret Stohl  --  Beautiful Creatures
  • The ceremony started late, the invocation by Cardinal Richard Cushing was extremely long, and the eighty-six-year-old poet Robert Frost was so blinded by the sun that he was unable to read the special verses he’d written for the occasion.
    Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Kennedy
  • Even as a schoolboy, I loved John Keats’s ode "To Autumn" for being an ark of the covenant between language and sensation; as an adolescent, I loved Gerard Manley Hopkins for the intensity of his exclamations which were also equations for a rapture and an ache I didn’t fully know I knew until I read him; I loved Robert Frost for his farmer’s accuracy and his wily down-to-earthness; and Chaucer too for much the same reasons.
    Seamus Heaney  --  Crediting Poetry
  • "It’s a Robert Frost poem.
    John Green  --  Looking for Alaska
  • Robert Frost is probably the champion of the symbolic action, although his uses of it are so sly that resolutely literal readers can miss the symbolic level entirely.
    Thomas C. Foster  --  How to Read Literature Like a Professor
  • Robert Frost routinely objected to being called a’nature poet, since by his count he only had three or four poems without a person in them.
    Thomas C. Foster  --  How to Read Literature Like a Professor
  • In "Birches" Robert Frost imagines climbing the supple birches up toward heaven, then being lightly set back on theground, and he declares that both going and coming back would be good (even without wings).
    Thomas C. Foster  --  How to Read Literature Like a Professor
  • Robert Frost doesn’t come right out and say, in "After Apple Picking," that it’s now October twenty-ninth or November umpteenth, but the fact that he’s finished his apple picking informs us we’re in autumn.
    Thomas C. Foster  --  How to Read Literature Like a Professor
  • Had she lain in her bed listening to T. Ray snore, reciting it while she fell asleep, wishing to God she could run away with Robert Frost? I gave a sideways glance at August.
    Sue Monk Kidd  --  The Secret Life of Bees
  • Chaucer says so, as do John Bunyan, Mark Twain, Herman Melville, Robert Frost, Jack Kerouac, Tom Robbins, Easy Rider, Thelma and Louise.
    Thomas C. Foster  --  How to Read Literature Like a Professor
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Associated words [difficulty]:   Robert Frost [6] , Emily Dickinson [6] , T.S. Eliot [5] , Emily Dickinson [6] , Walt Whitman [6] , Ezra Pound [7] , Allen Ginsberg [8] , Carl Sandburg [8] , Henry Wadsworth Longfellow [8] , W.H. Auden [8] , William Carlos Williams [8]
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Most commonly used in these subjects:   Classic Literature, Personal Finance, Nature & Ecology
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