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Wuthering Heights
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Wuthering Heights


Wuthering Heights.
Khaled Hosseini  --  The Kite Runner
  famous and still popular novel (by Emily Brontė) of the dark and turbulent love of Catherine and Heathcliff (1847)
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Strongly Associated with:   Charlotte Brontė, Jane Eyre, Emily Brontė
Notes:
Accelerated Reader Level/Points:  11.3 / 23
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Samples:
  • Wuthering Heights.
    Khaled Hosseini  --  The Kite Runner
  • Wuthering Heights is the name of Mr. Heathcliff’s dwelling.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • At thirteen, when her family lived in New York State, she developed such a fever for Laurence Olivier that, unbeknownst to her parents, she hopped a train to Manhattan to see him in Wuthering Heights.
    Laura Hillenbrand  --  Unbroken
  • In Wuthering Heights, Heathcliff is seen as a goblin, a demonic creature of the wild heath, but he must play his part in a household that was orderly before he came there.
    Homer  --  The Odyssey

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  • When I moved Wuthering Heights to the counter, Edward raised one eyebrow.
    Stephenie Meyer  --  Eclipse
  • We’d been just about to start Wuthering Heights, a novel she’d promised would be a vast improvement over David Copperfield, which she’d dragged us through like a death march for the last few weeks.
    Sarah Dessen  --  Lock and Key
  • But this kind of thing was not for them all, nor for any of them always; there were many tideless channels in which they dived in mere waywardness, retrieving, like Briac, fragments of old tunes, or like the English ex-curate, a new theory about Wuthering Heights.
    James Hilton  --  Lost Horizon
  • We had a pop quiz on Wuthering Heights.
    Stephenie Meyer  --  Twilight
  • He compared himself to Heathcliff from Wuthering Heights.
    James Patterson  --  Kiss the Girls
  • "Everything of Jane Austen, Wuthering Heights, and Jane Eyre, and all of Dickens and Shakespeare’s plays except Coriolanus, because everyone kills everyone, but I know Midsummer Night’s Dream almost by heart.
    Gloria Whelan  --  Listening for Lions

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  • It was Wuthering Heights, and everyone knows that is her favorite book—it’s no mystery."
    Libba Bray  --  Sweet Far Thing
  • For if PRIDE AND PREJUDICE matters, and MIDDLEMARCH and VILLETTE and WUTHERING HEIGHTS matter, then it matters far more than I can prove in an hour’s discourse that women generally, and not merely the lonely aristocrat shut up in her country house among her folios and her flatterers, took to writing.
    Virginia Woolf  --  A Room of One’s Own
  • I had half a mind to spend it by my study fire, instead of wading through heath and mud to Wuthering Heights.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • I had decided to read Wuthering Heights — the novel we were currently studying in English — yet again for the fun of it, and that’s what I was doing when Charlie came home.
    Stephenie Meyer  --  Twilight
  • ’I see the house at Wuthering Heights has "Earnshaw" carved over the front door.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • Have you been to Wuthering Heights?
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • When we got to Wuthering Heights, there he stood at the front door; and, as I passed in, I asked, ’how was the baby?’
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • Mr. Edgar seldom mustered courage to visit Wuthering Heights openly.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • Wuthering Heights rose above this silvery vapour; but our old house was invisible; it rather dips down on the other side.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • ’No, to Wuthering Heights,’ he answered: ’Mr.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • ’What do you think of his going to Wuthering Heights?’
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • How has he been living? how has he got rich? why is he staying at Wuthering Heights, the house of a man whom he abhors?
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • ’Well, yes — oh, you would intimate that her spirit has taken the post of ministering angel, and guards the fortunes of Wuthering Heights, even when her body is gone.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • At any rate, whatever were my wanderings, the clock chimed twelve as I entered the house; and that gave exactly an hour for every mile of the usual way from Wuthering Heights.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • I wanted something to happen which might have the effect of freeing both Wuthering Heights and the Grange of Mr. Heathcliff quietly; leaving us as we had been prior to his advent.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • Who knows but your father was Emperor of China, and your mother an Indian queen, each of them able to buy up, with one week’s income, Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange together?
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • Much against my inclination, I was persuaded to leave Wuthering Heights and accompany her here, Little Hareton was nearly five years old, and I had just begun to teach him his letters.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • They had invited them to spend the morrow at Wuthering Heights, and the invitation had been accepted, on one condition: Mrs. Linton begged that her darlings might be kept carefully apart from that ’naughty swearing boy.’
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • "Wuthering Heights,"he said.
    Stephenie Meyer  --  Eclipse
  • ’I thought I was lying in my chamber at Wuthering Heights.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • DEAR ELLEN, it begins, — I came last night to Wuthering Heights, and heard, for the first time, that Catherine has been, and is yet, very ill.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • ’In that case I’ll take measures to secure you, woman!’ exclaimed Heathcliff; ’you shall not leave Wuthering Heights till to-morrow morning.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • At Wuthering Heights it always sounded on quiet days following a great thaw or a season of steady rain.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • ’I have run the whole way from Wuthering Heights!’ she continued, after a pause; ’except where I’ve flown.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • Wuthering Heights and Mr. Heathcliff did not exist for her: she was a perfect recluse; and, apparently, perfectly contented.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • The road thither wound close by Wuthering Heights.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • And then, I thought, how ever will that weakling live at Wuthering Heights?
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • ’Tell Mr. Heathcliff,’ he answered calmly, ’that his son shall come to Wuthering Heights to-morrow.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • I don’t pretend to be intimately acquainted with the mode of living customary in those days at Wuthering Heights: I only speak from hearsay; for I saw little.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • And far rather would I be condemned to a perpetual dwelling in the infernal regions than, even for one night, abide beneath the roof of Wuthering Heights again.’
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • You may call at Wuthering Heights this afternoon, if you like, and say that I am not angry, but I’m sorry to have lost her; especially as I can never think she’ll be happy.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • Whatever I did, that idea would bother me: it was so tiresomely pertinacious that I resolved on requesting leave to go to Wuthering Heights, and assist in the last duties to the dead.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • ’This is nothing,’ cried she: ’I was only going to say that heaven did not seem to be my home; and I broke my heart with weeping to come back to earth; and the angels were so angry that they flung me out into the middle of the heath on the top of Wuthering Heights; where I woke sobbing for joy.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • ’Is Wuthering Heights as pleasant a place as Thrushcross Grange?’ he inquired, turning to take a last glance into the valley, whence a light mist mounted and formed a fleecy cloud on the skirts of the blue.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • My master, perceiving that she would not take his word for her uncle-in-law’s evil disposition, gave a hasty sketch of his conduct to Isabella, and the manner in which Wuthering Heights became his property.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • I had sought shelter at Wuthering Heights, almost gladly, because I was secured by that arrangement from living alone with him; but he knew the people we were coming amongst, and he did not fear their intermeddling.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • I rang the bell, and committed it to a servant’s care; and then I inquired what had urged her to escape from Wuthering Heights in such an unlikely plight, and where she meant to go, as she refused remaining with us.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • When I chanced to encounter the housekeeper of Wuthering Heights, in paying business visits to Gimmerton, I used to ask how the young master got on; for he lived almost as secluded as Catherine herself, and was never to be seen.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • And of Wuthering Heights Catherine was thinking as she listened: that is, if she thought or listened at all; but she had the vague, distant look I mentioned before, which expressed no recognition of material things either by ear or eye.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • Finally, she dived into a hollow; and before I came in sight of her again, she was two miles nearer Wuthering Heights than her own home; and I beheld a couple of persons arrest her, one of whom I felt convinced was Mr. Heathcliff himself.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
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Associated words [difficulty]:   Wuthering Heights [8] , Charlotte Brontė [7] , Jane Eyre [4] , Emily Brontė [7] , Jane Eyre [4] , Jane Austen [5] , Pride and Prejudice [5] , Charlotte Brontė [7] , Emily Brontė [7] , Sense and Sensibility [8] , Jane Eyre [4] , Heart of Darkness [5] , Moby-Dick [5] , Pride and Prejudice [5] , Robinson Crusoe [6] , The Catcher in the Rye [6] , The Count of Monte Cristo [6] , The Three Musketeers [6] , Anna Karenina [7] , Doctor Zhivago [7] , Great Expectations [7] , Gulliver’s Travels [7] , Little Women [7] , Lolita (the novel) [7] , Middlemarch [7] , Paradise Lost [7] , The Grapes of Wrath [7] , The Joy Luck Club [7] , A Tale of Two Cities [8] , Adventures of Huckleberry Finn [8] , Crime and Punishment [8] , Les Misérables [8] , Lord of the Flies [8] , Madame Bovary [8] , Mrs. Dalloway [8] , Of Mice and Men [8] , Pygmalion [8] , Rip Van Winkle [8] , Sense and Sensibility [8] , Slaughterhouse-Five [8] , The Brothers Karamazov [8] , The Color Purple [8] , The Great Gatsby [8] , The Hunchback of Notre Dame [8] , The Last of the Mohicans [8] , The Metamorphosis [8] , The Old Man and the Sea [8] , The Scarlet Letter [8] , Uncle Tom’s Cabin [8] , Animal Farm [9] , Bleak House [9] , Canterbury Tales [9] , One Hundred Years of Solitude [9] , The Adventures of Tom Sawyer [9] , The Call of the Wild [9] , The Sound and the Fury [9] , The Sun Also Rises [9] , The War of the Worlds [9]
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