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Lord Byron
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Lord Byron

Lord Byron was famously described by Lady Caroline Lamb as "mad, bad, and dangerous to know."
  most renowned English-language poet of his day who is also remembered for his scandalous behavior (1788-1824)
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Lord Byron George Byron
Amongst Byron’s best-known works are the brief poems "She walks in beauty," and "So, we’ll go no more a-roving," and the narrative poems Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage and Don Juan, although the latter remained incomplete on his death. He is regarded as one of the greatest European poets and remains widely read and influential, both in the English-speaking world and beyond.

Byron’s fame rests not only on his writings but also on his life, which featured extravagant living, numerous love affairs, debts, separation, and marital exploits. He was famously described by Lady Caroline Lamb as "mad, bad, and dangerous to know." (retrieved 8/5/08)
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Poem: So we'll go no more a roving
  • Lord Byron was famously described by Lady Caroline Lamb as "mad, bad, and dangerous to know."
  • It took an hour for Hollis to get ready, during which time Hassan and Lindsey chatted and watched The Today Show while Colin sat at the far edge of the couch and read one of the honks he’d stuffed in his backpack—a Lord Byron anthology including the poems Lara and Don Juan.
    John Green  --  An Abundance of Katherines
  • "Lord Byron," said Jeff Spender.
    Ray Bradbury  --  The Martian Chronicles
  • Lord Byron was beginning to make his mark; a note to a poem by Millevoye introduced him to France in these terms: a certain Lord Baron.
    Victor Hugo  --  Les Miserables

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  • Her movements seemed to call alive the words of the old poem (at least my mind was still working well enough that I recognized it as Lord Byron’s "She Walks in Beauty").
    P.C. Cast & Kristin Cast  --  Marked
  • The village people watched the debarkation with an awe akin to that which followed the Italian pilgrimages of Lord Byron a century before.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald  --  Tender is the Night
  • Dee himself had told the story of the greatest of all the Golems, the Red Golem of Prague, to Mary Shelley one cold winter’s evening when she, Lord Byron, the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley and the mysterious Dr. Polidori were visiting his castle in Switzerland in 1816.
    Micheal Scott  --  The Alchemyst
  • He knew it was right to begin so for he had seen similar titles in the collected poems of Lord Byron.
    James Joyce  --  A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
  • It was she who cast the deciding vote at the Shakespeare Reading Circle that the bard’s works should be varied with those of Mr. Dickens and Mr. Bulwer-Lytton and not the poems of Lord Byron, as had been suggested by a young and, Melanie privately feared, very fast bachelor member of the Circle.
    Margaret Mitchell  --  Gone with the Wind
  • Lord Byron’s "dark blue seas" could not fail of being brought forward by their present view, and she gladly gave him all her attention as long as attention was possible.
    Jane Austen  --  Persuasion

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  • He’d taken the old dinosaur program from the files of the Taylor Lab, adapted it to the common Defense Department computer language, ADA—named for Lady Ada Lovelace, daughter of Lord Byron—and then tightened it up.
    Tom Clancy  --  The Hunt for Red October
  • They found only her head, lying upright in the center of Lord Byron’s Plaza as if she had been buried to her neck in pourable marble.
    Dan Simmons  --  Hyperion
  • But it is morally instructive to know that he was a good student and educated himself, in striking contrast to the loose ways and so-called aristocratic society-life of Lord Byron, on which I have just spoken.
    Sinclair Lewis  --  Main Street
  • …walls, climbs Nelson’s Pillar, hangs from the top ledge by his eyelids, eats twelve dozen oysters (shells included), heals several sufferers from king’s evil, contracts his face so as to resemble many historical personages, Lord Beaconsfield, Lord Byron, Wat Tyler, Moses of Egypt, Moses Maimonides, Moses Mendelssohn, Henry Irving, Rip van Winkle, Kossuth, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Baron Leopold Rothschild, Robinson Crusoe, Sherlock Holmes, Pasteur, turns each foot simultaneously in…
    James Joyce  --  Ulysses
  • Both times we had a Cambridge man—John Dee, and then Lord Byron—it was an absolute disaster.
    James A. Owen  --  Here, There be Dragons
  • The "Last Words" of great men, Napoleon, Lord Byron, were still printed in gift-books, and the dying murmurs of every common man and woman were listened for and treasured by their neighbours and kinsfolk.
    Willa Cather  --  Death Comes for the Archbishop
  • It was such a hot night outside that he had worn no necktie; just a white sport shirt, open at the throat, and I had a blurred thought about how much he looked like the picture of Lord Byron that had hung on the wall of my English room at school.
    Maureen Daly  --  Seventeenth Summer
  • Speaking of the properties of flame, methought Shelley’s poetry emitted a purer light than almost any other productions of his day, contrasting beautifully with the fitful and lurid gleams and gushes of black vapor that flashed and eddied from the volumes of Lord Byron.
    Nathaniel Hawthorne  --  Earth’s Holocaust
  • Charles Lamb, with his infinite tact, attempting to, might have drawn charming pictures of the life of his day; Lord Byron in a stanza of Don Juan, aiming at the impossible, might have achieved the sublime; Oscar Wilde, heaping jewels of Ispahan upon brocades of Byzantium, might have created a troubling beauty.
    W. Somerset Maugham  --  Of Human Bondage
  • Lord Byron, a nineteenth-century poet.
    Ray Bradbury  --  The Martian Chronicles
  • He would gain cheerfulness, and she would learn to be an enthusiast for Scott and Lord Byron; nay, that was probably learnt already; of course they had fallen in love over poetry.
    Jane Austen  --  Persuasion
  • Their conversation the preceding evening did not disincline him to seek her again; and they walked together some time, talking as before of Mr Scott and Lord Byron, and still as unable as before, and as unable as any other two readers, to think exactly alike of the merits of either, till something occasioned an almost general change amongst their party, and instead of Captain Benwick, she had Captain Harville by her side.
    Jane Austen  --  Persuasion
  • …on thick when hes there they know by his sly eye blinking a bit putting on the indifferent when they come out with something the kind he is what spoils him I dont wonder in the least because he was very handsome at that time trying to look like Lord Byron I said I liked though he was too beautiful for a man and he was a little before we got engaged afterwards though she didnt like it so much the day I was in fits of laughing with the giggles I couldnt stop about all my hairpins falling…
    James Joyce  --  Ulysses
  • …he hasnt long greasy hair hanging into his eyes or standing up like a red Indian what do they go about like that for only getting themselves and their poetry laughed at I always liked poetry when I was a girl first I thought he was a poet like lord Byron and not an ounce of it in his composition I thought he was quite different I wonder is he too young hes about wait 88 I was married 88 Milly is 15 yesterday 89 what age was he then at Dillons 5 or 6 about 88 I suppose hes 20 or more Im…
    James Joyce  --  Ulysses
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Associated words [difficulty]:   Lord Byron [8] , John Keats [4] , Percy Bysshe Shelley [7] , Mary Shelley [8] , John Keats [4] , Alexander Pope [7] , Dylan Thomas [7] , Percy Bysshe Shelley [7] , William Blake [7] , Matthew Arnold [8] , Robert Browning [8] , Tennyson [8] , Elizabeth Barrett Browning [9] , William Wordsworth [9]
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