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Candide


Candide is Voltaire’s most famous work and is probably taught more than any other work of French literature.
  Voltaire’s classic satire that pokes fun at religion, government, and optimism (1759)
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  • Candide is Voltaire’s most famous work and is probably taught more than any other work of French literature.
  • One sunny afternoon I was loitering on the bench in front of the electric shop in the sun, listlessly trying to read a slim volume of Candide that some wiseacre had sent me.
    Piper Kerman  --  Orange Is the New Black
  • That which overwhelmed Othello glides innocuous over Candide.
    Victor Hugo  --  Les Miserables
  • When we read Candide it opened up a new way of looking at the world to Chet, and he continued hungrily reading Voltaire, in French, while the class went on to other people.
    John Knowles  --  A Separate Peace

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  • "Candide" has not aged.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • Fortunately, Voltaire was the author of "Candide" in spite of this, and in spite of this, he is, among all the men who have followed each other in the long series of humanity, the one who has best possessed the diabolical laugh.
    Victor Hugo  --  The Hunchback of Notre Dame
  • But I’ve read Candide in the Russian translation . in an absurd, grotesque, old translation .
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky  --  The Brothers Karamazov
  • Bernstein forged a new relationship between classical and popular music with his compositions West Side Story, On the Town, Candide, and others.
    Jay Allison, et al.  --  This I Believe
  • INTRODUCTION Ever since 1759, when Voltaire wrote "Candide" in ridicule of the notion that this is the best of all possible worlds, this world has been a gayer place for readers.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • "Candide" never bored anybody except William Wordsworth.
    Voltaire  --  Candide

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  • There is no social pity in "Candide."
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • "Candide" is only a "Hamlet" and a half long.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • "Candide" is a full book.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • Many propagandist satirical books have been written with "Candide" in mind, but not too many.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • That is why the present is one of the right moments to republish "Candide."
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • I HOW CANDIDE WAS BROUGHT UP IN A MAGNIFICENT CASTLE, AND HOW HE WAS EXPELLED THENCE.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • He combined a true judgment with simplicity of spirit, which was the reason, I apprehend, of his being called Candide.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • The Preceptor Pangloss[1] was the oracle of the family, and little Candide heard his lessons with all the good faith of his age and character.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • II WHAT BECAME OF CANDIDE AMONG THE BULGARIANS.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • They went up to Candide and very civilly invited him to dinner.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • "Gentlemen," replied Candide, with a most engaging modesty, "you do me great honour, but I have not wherewithal to pay my share."
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • "You are right," said Candide; "this is what I was always taught by Mr. Pangloss, and I see plainly that all is for the best."
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • Candide, all stupefied, could not yet very well realise how he was a hero.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • As they were going to proceed to a third whipping, Candide, able to bear no more, begged as a favour that they would be so good as to shoot him.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • An able surgeon cured Candide in three weeks by means of emollients taught by Dioscorides.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • III HOW CANDIDE MADE HIS ESCAPE FROM THE BULGARIANS, AND WHAT AFTERWARDS BECAME OF HIM.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • Candide, who trembled like a philosopher, hid himself as well as he could during this heroic butchery.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • Candide fled quickly to another village; it belonged to the Bulgarians; and the Abarian heroes had treated it in the same way.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • "I have not heard it," answered Candide; "but whether he be, or whether he be not, I want bread."
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • IV HOW CANDIDE FOUND HIS OLD MASTER PANGLOSS, AND WHAT HAPPENED TO THEM.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • Candide recoiled in disgust.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • Upon which Candide carried him to the Anabaptist’s stable, and gave him a crust of bread.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • As soon as Pangloss had refreshed himself a little: "Well," said Candide, "Cunegonde?"
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • Candide fainted at this word; his friend recalled his senses with a little bad vinegar which he found by chance in the stable.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • Candide reopened his eyes.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • "Well, this is wonderful!" said Candide, "but you must get cured."
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • V TEMPEST, SHIPWRECK, EARTHQUAKE, AND WHAT BECAME OF DOCTOR PANGLOSS, CANDIDE, AND JAMES THE ANABAPTIST.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • Candide drew near and saw his benefactor, who rose above the water one moment and was then swallowed up for ever.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • The villain swam safely to the shore, while Pangloss and Candide were borne thither upon a plank.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • "This is the Last Day!" cried Candide.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • Some falling stones had wounded Candide.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • "Nothing more probable," said Candide; "but for the love of God a little oil and wine."
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • Candide fainted away, and Pangloss fetched him some water from a neighbouring fountain.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • VI HOW THE PORTUGUESE MADE A BEAUTIFUL AUTO-DA-FE, TO PREVENT ANY FURTHER EARTHQUAKES; AND HOW CANDIDE WAS PUBLICLY WHIPPED.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • VII HOW THE OLD WOMAN TOOK CARE OF CANDIDE, AND HOW HE FOUND THE OBJECT HE LOVED.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • Candide, amazed at all he had suffered and still more with the charity of the old woman, wished to kiss her hand.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • Candide, notwithstanding so many disasters, ate and slept.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • The old woman knocked at a little door, it opened, she led Candide up a private staircase into a small apartment richly furnished.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • "Take off that veil," said the old woman to Candide.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • "Do so," replied Candide.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
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Associated words [difficulty]:   Candide [8] , Don Quixote de la Mancha [4] , Sherlock Holmes [4] , Henry James [6] , Samuel Johnson [6] , David Copperfield [7] , Ralph Waldo Emerson [7] , The Hound of the Baskervilles [7] , Franz Kafka [8] , Rabindranath Tagore [9]
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Most commonly used in these subjects:   Classic Literature, Philosophy, Logic & Reasoning
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