To see details on the word
chromosome
please enable javascript.

chromosome


They use terms like "chromosome rearrangement," or "delayed mutation" to explain why their science is not an exact science.
R.J. Palacio  --  Wonder
  a threadlike body in the cell nucleus that carries the genes in a linear order
Home
 Mark word for later review on this computer
chromosome chromosomes
Strongly Associated with:   gene, X chromosome, Y chromosome
Web Links:
(try right-click if popups are disabled)
Dictionary - Vocabulary.com®
Dictionary/Synonyms - Google®
Dictionary List - OneLook®
Wikipedia Article
Google Images
Samples:
  • They use terms like "chromosome rearrangement," or "delayed mutation" to explain why their science is not an exact science.
    R.J. Palacio  --  Wonder
  • How many chromosomes does a human have?
    Sharon M. Draper  --  Out of My Mind
  • The disease they have is in their blood, in the structure of their chromosomes.
    Toni Morrison  --  Song of Solomon
  • "Wonder what my chromosomes are like," I muttered randomly.
    Stephenie Meyer  --  Breaking Dawn

  • Show more
  • Their chromosomes and proteins have been studied with such detail and precision that scientists know their every quirk.
    Rebecca Skloot  --  The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
  • She and her husband went to the A.B.C.C. to have their chromosomes checked, and though nothing abnormal was found they decided not to try again to have a child.
    John Hersey  --  Hiroshima
  • But, to answer your question, the reason we know all the animals are female is that we literally make them that way: we control their chromosomes, and we control the intra-egg developmental environment.
    Michael Crichton  --  Jurassic Park
  • By DNA we mean the chromosomes, or hereditary structures, that are found in all living cells.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie’s World
  • It wasn’t just about blood relations or shared chromosomes, but something wider, bigger.
    Sarah Dessen  --  Lock and Key
  • NICK (With that small smile) Not exactly: chromosomes.
    Edward Albee  --  Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

  • Show more again
  • For years it was stated that men had forty-eight chromosomes in their cells; there were pictures to prove it, and any number of careful studies.
    Michael Crichton  --  The Andromeda Strain
  • I thought of telling them about the computer tally, the time-factored death I carried in my chromosomes and blood.
    Don DeLillo  --  White Noise
  • Even the Institute was helpless in erasing the signature of chromosomes.
    Pat Conroy  --  The Lords of Discipline
  • This is a woman she has an extra chromosome for changing the subject.
    Don DeLillo  --  Underworld
  • " In a nod to the female chromosomes, it could also be called "the double X solution.
    Nicholas D. Kristof  --  Half the Sky
  • But Ben had bad eyesight—a chance collision of unlucky chromosomes the night of his conception—and perhaps in fact a general weakness of sense mechanisms, so that his hold on physical reality was tentative.
    John Gardner  --  The Sunlight Dialogues
  • He believed, like Doc Peret, that somewhere inside each man is a biological center for the exercise of courage, a piece of tissue that might be touched and sparked and made to respond, a chemical maybe, or a lone chromosome that when made to fire would produce a blaze of valor that even the biles could not extinguish.
    Tim O’Brien  --  Going After Cacciato
  • Chromosomes mean nothing to us, not really.
    Roger Zelazny  --  Lord of Light
  • There are countless people under words like "chromosome rearrangement," or "delayed mutation."
    R.J. Palacio  --  Wonder
  • They were told that August had what seemed to be a "previously unknown type of mandibulofacial dysostosis caused by an autosomal recessive mutation in the TCOF1 gene, which is located on chromosome 5, complicated by a hemifacial microsomia characteristic of OAV spectrum."
    R.J. Palacio  --  Wonder
  • NICK: Oh, the chromosome business .
    Edward Albee  --  Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
  • Your . your husband was telling me all about the . chromosomes.
    Edward Albee  --  Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
  • Researchers had long believed that human cells contained forty-eight chromosomes, the threads of DNA inside cells that contain all of our genetic information.
    Rebecca Skloot  --  The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
  • But chromosomes clumped together, making it impossible to get an accurate count.
    Rebecca Skloot  --  The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
  • GEORGE: The chromosomes, Martha . the genes, or whatever they are.
    Edward Albee  --  Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
  • The chromosomes inside the cells swelled and spread out, and for the first time, scientists could see each of them clearly.
    Rebecca Skloot  --  The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
  • He’s quite terrifying, with his chromosomes, and all.
    Edward Albee  --  Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
  • HONEY (A little thickly) It’s because of your chromosomes, dear.
    Edward Albee  --  Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
  • MARTHA: (To NICK) What’s all this about chromosomes?
    Edward Albee  --  Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
  • NICK: Well, chromosomes are .
    Edward Albee  --  Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
  • MARTHA: I know what chromosomes are, sweetie, I love ’em.
    Edward Albee  --  Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
  • Once scientists knew how many chromosomes people were supposed to have, they could tell when a person had too many or too few, which made it possible to diagnose genetic diseases.
    Rebecca Skloot  --  The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
  • That accidental discovery was the first of several developments that would allow two researchers from Spain and Sweden to discover that normal human cells have forty-six chromosomes.
    Rebecca Skloot  --  The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
  • But these researchers also went back to reexamine the old pictures, and the old studies—and found only forty-six chromosomes, not forty-eight.
    Michael Crichton  --  The Andromeda Strain
  • In 1953, a group of American researchers announced to the world that the human chromosome number was forty-six.
    Michael Crichton  --  The Andromeda Strain
  • About his chromosomes.
    Stephenie Meyer  --  Breaking Dawn
  • Researchers worldwide would soon begin identifying chromosomal disorders, discovering that patients with Down syndrome had an extra chromosome number 21, patients with Klinefelter syndrome had an extra sex chromosome, and those with Turner syndrome lacked all or part of one.
    Rebecca Skloot  --  The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
  • If a chromosome disappeared and production of a certain enzyme stopped, researchers knew the gene for that enzyme must be on the most recently vanished chromosome.
    Rebecca Skloot  --  The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
  • Researchers worldwide would soon begin identifying chromosomal disorders, discovering that patients with Down syndrome had an extra chromosome number 21, patients with Klinefelter syndrome had an extra sex chromosome, and those with Turner syndrome lacked all or part of one.
    Rebecca Skloot  --  The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
  • The Rule of 48 was intended as a humorous reminder to scientists, and referred to the massive literature collected in the late 1940’s and the 1950’s concerning the human chromosome number.
    Michael Crichton  --  The Andromeda Strain
  • No panting megacenter to absorb our woe, to distract us from our unremitting sense of time— time as the agent of our particular ruin, our chromosome breaks, hysterically multiplying tissue.
    Don DeLillo  --  White Noise
  • This allowed scientists to begin mapping human genes to specific chromosomes by tracking the order in which genetic traits vanished.
    Rebecca Skloot  --  The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
  • To the untrained eye, it simply creates a beautiful mosaic of colored chromosomes.
    Rebecca Skloot  --  The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
  • Christoph had framed a fourteen-by-twenty-inch print of Henrietta’s chromosomes that he’d "painted" using FISH.
    Rebecca Skloot  --  The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
  • Deborah traced her mother’s chromosomes in the picture with her finger.
    Rebecca Skloot  --  The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
  • The man who discovered that fact was Walter Nelson-Rees, a chromosome expert who was director of cell culture at the Naval laboratory.
    Rebecca Skloot  --  The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
  • If a chromosome disappeared and production of a certain enzyme stopped, researchers knew the gene for that enzyme must be on the most recently vanished chromosome.
    Rebecca Skloot  --  The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
  • Hsu was the University of Texas geneticist whose earlier work with HeLa and other cells had made it possible to discover the correct number of human chromosomes.
    Rebecca Skloot  --  The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
  • This explained the mechanics of HeLa’s immortality: telomerase constantly rewound the ticking clock at the end of Henrietta’s chromosomes so they never grew old and never died.
    Rebecca Skloot  --  The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
  • They also knew that there was a string of DNA at the end of each chromosome called a telomere, which shortened a tiny bit each time a cell divided, like time ticking off a clock.
    Rebecca Skloot  --  The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
Search for samples from other sources:
(try right-click if popups are disabled)
Interest -- Source
General -- Google News®
General -- Time® Magazine
General -- Twitter®
Associated words [difficulty]:   chromosome [4] , gene [1] , Y chromosome [8] , virus [1] , bacteria [2] , cloning [2] , quarantine [2] , vaccine [2] , microbe [4] , natural selection [6] , endorphin [7] , theory of evolution [7] , Y chromosome [8] , collagen [8] , evolutionary psychology [8] , pasteurization [8] , pheromone [8] , histamine [9] , in vitro fertilization [9]
     If popups are enabled: Search in OneLook®   If Flash® is also enabled: Search in Visuwords®
Most commonly used in these subjects:   Medicine, Nature & Ecology, Science
Home
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading